Fixing My Lathe AKA Thanks Timberwolf
#4
  
I got my lathe by hauling it out of my dad's barn where it was rusting away several years ago.  He had no recollection of getting it. so provenance was unknown.  It has an indexing feature that I could never use because the headstock pulley was pushed too far to the inboard side of the lathe.  When I first got it, I made a few attempts to move the pulley over, but was never able to.  A few weeks ago I decided it was time to do a complete teardown on the lathe including the speed adjustment.    After many emails and pictures sent to Timberwolf I got the pulley in the correct position.  Here's the setup.  The manual says you are supposed to be able to move the spindle for changing belts by 'tapping' the spindle.  I could never get it to move with a hammer, so I used a piece of all thread as a drawbar. There's some plywood scrap as a spacer/protector between the pulley and the side of the headstock.  All the blocking on the inboard side is to allow the spindle and bearing to be drawn to the inboard side.  It's not the prettiest, but it worked.  After I took the draw bar out, I just pushed the spindle back to the outboard side and the pulley was in the correct location.   

   
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#5
  Re: Fixing My Lathe AKA Thanks Timberwolf by crokett™ (I got my lathe by ha...)
(01-20-2018, 06:53 PM)crokett™ Wrote: I got my lathe by hauling it out of my dad's barn where it was rusting away several years ago.  He had no recollection of getting it. so provenance was unknown.  It has an indexing feature that I could never use because the headstock pulley was pushed too far to the inboard side of the lathe.  When I first got it, I made a few attempts to move the pulley over, but was never able to.  A few weeks ago I decided it was time to do a complete teardown on the lathe including the speed adjustment.    After many emails and pictures sent to Timberwolf I got the pulley in the correct position.  Here's the setup.  The manual says you are supposed to be able to move the spindle for changing belts by 'tapping' the spindle.  I could never get it to move with a hammer, so I used a piece of all thread as a drawbar. There's some plywood scrap as a spacer/protector between the pulley and the side of the headstock.  All the blocking on the inboard side is to allow the spindle and bearing to be drawn to the inboard side.  It's not the prettiest, but it worked.  After I took the draw bar out, I just pushed the spindle back to the outboard side and the pulley was in the correct location.   

It is so good you got it fixed and look forward to seeing you use it.
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#6
  Re: RE: Fixing My Lathe AKA Thanks Timberwolf by Arlin Eastman ([quote='crokett™' pi...)
(01-20-2018, 09:38 PM)Arlin Eastman Wrote: It is so good you got it fixed and look forward to seeing you use it.

yeah Arlin. I have a bowl I turned green where I did it as an undercut rim thinking that someday I was going to get the indexing fixed so I could maybe try a pierced rim bowl.  So that's a project for later this year.
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