Brush Cleaning
#15
  Re: Brush Cleaning by Halfathumb (Over the years I've ...)
I just use a garden variety scrub brush and just be careful with it. Just knock off the drying stuff on the outside of the bristles. For latex and enamel, I use carpet cleaner. I've got a 1/2 gallon jug of Bissel (sp). I wet my hands first so the paint doesn't stick to them, work the carpet cleaner into the bristles and then rinse out the brush. I've tried paint thinner and it takes forever but I guess that's what's needed forcertain paints.

Doing a lot of painting these days.

Something I've noticed.... rollers these days are real crappy. Even the "Best" from the borgs. I used to be able to clean them and reuse them several times. They aren't worth a hoot after cleaning now.
Good judgement comes from experience.
Experience comes from poor judgement.

Neil Summers Home Inspections
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#16
  Re: Brush Cleaning by Halfathumb (Over the years I've ...)
I didn’t see a brush spinner mentioned in this thread. As a “former” painter, we always spun our brushes after each cleaning. Then put it back in the jacket to help keep its shape.

Spinning helps remove any remaining water or solvent that’s essentially diluted with remanants of whatever finish you were using. It will then hardened to a certain degree and there will be a mild “crunching” when going to use the brush next time if you don’t spin it. Finish that doesn’t get cleaned out up high in the brush is what ruins brushes. You can also spin them somewhat in your two palms but it’s not as good. Do it in a trash can to help throwing fluid everywhere. Outside away from your cars or house is best.

I clean all of my rollers. Lambs wool or a lambs wool blend is the best. They don’t compress as bad as synthetics, they don’t shed as bad, and they leave a nicer stipple, IMO. New synthetics will shed fibers much more. Wrapping tape around them and then removing, followed but a water rinse, will help. Same goes with rollers—put them on the brush spinner and it’s like new again.


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#17
  Re: Brush Cleaning by Halfathumb (Over the years I've ...)
Interesting that spinning helps that much. I've seen the spinners and wondered what the point was but it makes sense to get the messy rinsate out of there. I don't always have the packaging ithey came in but a lot of times what I do is a snuggly wrap a paper towel around the end of the brush to help it keep its shape as it dries.
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#18
  Re: RE: Brush Cleaning by Kansas City Fireslayer (I didn’t see a brush...)
(02-15-2018, 03:00 PM)Kansas City Fireslayer Wrote: I didn’t see a brush spinner mentioned in this thread.  As a “former” painter, we always spun our brushes after each cleaning.  Then put it back in the jacket to help keep its shape.  

Spinning helps remove any remaining water or solvent that’s essentially diluted with remanants of whatever finish you were using.  It will then hardened to a certain degree and there will be a mild “crunching” when going to use the brush next time if you don’t spin it.  Finish that doesn’t get cleaned out up high in the brush is what ruins brushes.  You can also spin them somewhat in your two palms but it’s not as good.  Do it in a trash can to help throwing fluid everywhere.  Outside away from your cars or house is best.

I clean all of my rollers.  Lambs wool or a lambs wool blend is the best.  They don’t compress as bad as synthetics, they don’t  shed as bad, and they leave a nicer stipple, IMO.  New synthetics will shed fibers much more.  Wrapping tape around them and then removing, followed but a water rinse, will help.  Same goes with rollers—put them on the brush spinner and it’s like new again.

My dad was a professional painter and he always spun his brushes and rollers after each cleaning.  When I was a kid I frequently got tasked with cleaning brushes and rollers, and spinning them was always the best part of the process.
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