What tool am I missing?
#11
  
I turn one year older at the end of this month and my wife does not know what to get me.  We are retired comfortably and while still fugal I buy what I want within reason.  It is hard to buy for someone who buys whatever they want.  I feel I have one of everything and two of most but there are a few things I could use.  Amongst things I have considered recently: 
  1. Drum sander.  I was motivated by a sale on a 16-32 recently but not sure it is wide enough or I can fit in my garage.
  2. Shoulder plane.  I figure would really come in handy cleaning up tenons dados, and joints.  Just not sure to get small or large one.
Looking for any suggestions or input on what I need to add to my shop, because I am going to be one year older.  You can comment on what I have looked at recently or add other suggestions on tools that will add to my joy in the shop.
A carpenter's house is never done.
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#12
  Re: What tool am I missing? by photobug (I turn one year olde...)
I bought a used Performax 16/32 several years ago from the widow of a woodworking friend who passed away. I've never used it. I use my shoulder plane all the time.
Just sayin' ... This is one of those things that truly depends on the way you work. Lots of people get along fine without ever owning a shoulder plane and would probably die at the thought of doing without a drum sander.

Hank
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#13
  Re: What tool am I missing? by photobug (I turn one year olde...)
I want a drum sander but don't have one yet.

I'm not a hand tool user (yet) but my Stanley shoulder plane see a LOT of use in my shop.
Semper fi,
Brad

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#14
  Re: RE: What tool am I missing? by Hank Knight (I bought a used Perf...)
(02-12-2018, 02:09 PM)Hank Knight Wrote: I bought a used Performax 16/32 several years ago from the widow of a woodworking friend who passed away. I've never used it. 

Hank

My thinking as well, 16/32 is not wide enough.  If you had a 19/38 you could finish whole doors with it, while the 16/32 does not cover a whole door.

I was thinking a drum sander leaves clean boards of consistent thickness ready for joining or prefect for gluing up complex cutting boards.  A question I have been meaning to ask, how can you prep boards for glue on a cutting board without a drum sander?  Does it require good bench plane skills?


Sounds like a shoulder plane is a good addition to the shop.  Which one should I own?
A carpenter's house is never done.
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#15
  Re: RE: What tool am I missing? by photobug ([quote='Hank Knight'...)
(02-12-2018, 02:55 PM)photobug Wrote: My thinking as well, 16/32 is not wide enough.  If you had a 19/38 you could finish whole doors with it, while the 16/32 does not cover a whole door.

I was thinking a drum sander leaves clean boards of consistent thickness ready for joining or prefect for gluing up complex cutting boards.  A question I have been meaning to ask, how can you prep boards for glue on a cutting board without a drum sander?  Does it require good bench plane skills?


Sounds like a shoulder plane is a good addition to the shop.  Which one should I own?

At the moment, I have about 10 planes in my shop - most are from Lee Valley's Veritas line which I find excellent (pricey but there are more expensive options) - their shoulder planes are shown below - I have the medium one along w/ one of the smaller detail rabbet planes.  Dave Smile


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Piedmont North Carolina
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#16
  Re: RE: What tool am I missing? by photobug ([quote='Hank Knight'...)
(02-12-2018, 02:55 PM)photobug Wrote: My thinking as well, 16/32 is not wide enough.  If you had a 19/38 you could finish whole doors with it, while the 16/32 does not cover a whole door.

I was thinking a drum sander leaves clean boards of consistent thickness ready for joining or prefect for gluing up complex cutting boards.  A question I have been meaning to ask, how can you prep boards for glue on a cutting board without a drum sander?  Does it require good bench plane skills?


Sounds like a shoulder plane is a good addition to the shop.  Which one should I own?

Cutting boards can be done three ways - face grain, edge grain, and end grain. Final thicknessing can be done on a planer or a drum sander, although end grain cutting boards are difficult (if not impossible) to plane safely.

For face grain, I've never done any boards wider than 6", so these edges are prepped for glue using the planer and running them through on edge. This gives you the parallel edges you need. I suppose with good jointer skills you could use that as well. I don't taper many boards intentionally but I have considered doing a cutting board design like that.

For edge grain, I plane my boards like normal and rip narrow strips for glue up. I will usually do about 1 1/8" wide, so the final thickness is about 1". These glue joints are all face grain to face grain (quite strong) but the strips are limited to the thickness of the board.
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#17
  Re: What tool am I missing? by photobug (I turn one year olde...)
I've seen YouTube videos of folks using a planer to flatten cutting boards, but it's a slow process because they take off so little at a time. There's also a bit of set up and finagling that aren't involved with face planing.

On the "which size" shoulder plane question: I think my Stanley is an inch wide. I see myself getting a smaller and larger plane in the future to go along with it.
Semper fi,
Brad

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#18
  Re: What tool am I missing? by photobug (I turn one year olde...)
(02-12-2018, 01:41 PM)photobug Wrote: I turn one year older at the end of this month and my wife does not know what to get me.  We are retired comfortably and while still fugal I buy what I want within reason.  It is hard to buy for someone who buys whatever they want.  I feel I have one of everything and two of most but there are a few things I could use.  Amongst things I have considered recently: 
  1. Drum sander.  I was motivated by a sale on a 16-32 recently but not sure it is wide enough or I can fit in my garage.
  2. Shoulder plane.  I figure would really come in handy cleaning up tenons dados, and joints.  Just not sure to get small or large one.
Looking for any suggestions or input on what I need to add to my shop, because I am going to be one year older.  You can comment on what I have looked at recently or add other suggestions on tools that will add to my joy in the shop.


How have you gotten along without a shoulder plane?  I use mine all the time even though I mostly use loose tenon joinery.  I have a Record; couldn't tell you the number, but the front comes off to convert to a short shoulder plane or bullnose plane.  I make a lot of shop sawn veneer and couldn't get along without a drum sander either.  I had an 18x36 Delta for 7 or 8 years and had no real complaints about it other than it was slow.  I sold it a year ago and upgraded to a 24" dual drum sander.  Much better in both quality and speed, although I'll never be satisfied with how slow a drum sander is compared to a planer.  

How do you make joints?  If you like a chisel mortise or cutting them by hand, my hat's off to you.  If not, I'd look into router driven loose tenon joinery, or a Domino if you have the money.  Loose tenon joinery was a complete game changer for me.  

John
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#19
  Re: What tool am I missing? by photobug (I turn one year olde...)
Both are great additions. I’ve had a Stanley 92 for many years and it’s used often enough to live in the tool tray of my bench. I use it most to clean up RT and TS cuts for shop made moldings and trim pieces.

I recently added a Performax 37/2 dual drum and it’s an impressive machine. I recently flattened an over the toilet cabinet box and the face frame with it. I’m itching to make end grain cutting boards with it—shop made veneers as well.

On a side note; I use to flatten the cutting boards with a LA LN jack. It worked well with a careful glue up but a very sharp iron and premium plane are a must, IMO. A strong and well conditioned group of “planing muscles” is a near must—Ibuprofen as well.

Also, I agree with the 19/38 DS recommendation. I’d buy the Supermax and was planning to if I wouldn’t of found the dual post 37/2.


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#20
  Re: What tool am I missing? by photobug (I turn one year olde...)
Quote:....... tools that will add to my joy in the shop.

Can't speak for you, but can say the shoulder plane does bring me joy.   Have all three sizes.  Use the medium size the most. 

Just my opinion, but the only cutting board worth making is the end grain cutting board.  Just about everyone in our family has, and uses one.  Some outsiders own one they purchased.  Me, i really enjoy cutting 'stuff' on an end grain cutting board.  They are really nice looking too.  Some folks had to be firmly instructed to use their cutting board; they wouldn't use it, because it was so 'pretty'.    Me, i wouldn't enjoy making end grain cutting boards, if i didn't have a drum sander; one could conclude the drum sander brings joy to my shop

The drum sander is used in my shop a way way more than the shoulder plane.  Sure do enjoy using a shoulder plane.

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