Shop apron
#11
  
Hello all,

What are your thoughts about a shop apron made from 1000 denier cordura nylon fabric?

I have the fabric already and I'm thinking about looking into a new shop apron.

There are a few things that I wish my apron had and I was thinking of the possibility of making my own.
I just don't know if this will be too warm or too stiff.

Thoughts?
Peter

My "day job"
Reply
#12
  Re: Shop apron by Peter Tremblay (Hello all, What a...)
Have one, made of Cotton duck ( think Carhart stuff)...has padded shoulder straps....A bit stiff,  I use it  as a quick strop, while sitting at the bench doing Dovetails and the like.   Biggest complaint I have...pockets fill up with dust and shavings too fast...
Show me a picture, I'll build a project from that
Reply
#13
  Re: Shop apron by Peter Tremblay (Hello all, What a...)
Google seems to indicate that it is fire retardant.
That is a plus.
Ag
Reply
#14
  Re: Shop apron by Peter Tremblay (Hello all, What a...)
Peter Tremblay


Hey Peter...Cordura can be stiff, as in a carpenter's tool pouch, or it can be flexible as in jackets. My concern would be the static electricity that accompanies too much nylon...I hate those little zaps.... Yes

Andrew
"That's like getting a running start and diving headfirst into the vortex."

                                 Steve Freidman 4/21/2013
Reply
#15
  Re: RE: Shop apron by Humanbackhoe (Peter Tremblay ...)
(02-21-2018, 07:57 AM)Humanbackhoe Wrote: Peter Tremblay


Hey Peter...Cordura can be stiff, as in a carpenter's tool pouch, or it can be flexible as in jackets. My concern would be the static electricity that accompanies too much nylon...I hate those little zaps.... Yes

Andrew

1000 denier is backpack material.  That ought to hold up over time, for you and your ancestors.  A custom tailored shop apron.  Nice.
My apron is waxed canvas.  I don't experience any "hot" issues.  It seems comparable to your material in that regard.  I would use the Cordura if I had it.  Invest in good polyester thread.  You probably already know, but be sure to melt, roll or wrap the edge or it will fray.  Maybe you can use something a bit lighter, softer and easier to work with for the edge tape and carry on with that for shoulder and waist straps, pockets, etc.. 

It will be interesting to see how well wood glue peels and flakes off Cordura over the years.  I am guessing it will shed fairly well.
Reply
#16
  Re: Shop apron by Peter Tremblay (Hello all, What a...)
I would not recommend any fabric that attracts static electricity for a shop apron.  It'll become a sawdust magnet.  And, it won't just attract sawdust, it'll be attracted to some kinds of wood.  That might be a safety consideration if you're using power tools or just using a hand saw.  There is a version of Cordura that is static dissipative, but I doubt that's what you have.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
Reply
#17
  Re: Shop apron by Peter Tremblay (Hello all, What a...)
I've made a few things from 1000 denier cordura nylon ...

A grill cover, a few first aid kit pouches, a cover for a camping coffee maker, etc.

IIRC the stuff I used had a waterproof backing ... or perhaps the material is just like that.

Anyway ... I wouldn't recommend it for an apron.
It would definitely wear ... but it would be stiff and as it's nylon non-permeable ... i.e. sweaty.
~Dan.
Reply
#18
  Re: RE: Shop apron by Dan Moening (I've made a few thin...)
(02-21-2018, 02:21 PM)Dan Moening Wrote: I've made a few things from 1000 denier cordura nylon ...

A grill cover, a few first aid kit pouches, a cover for a camping coffee maker, etc.

IIRC the stuff I used had a waterproof backing ... or perhaps the material is just like that.

Anyway ... I wouldn't recommend it for an apron.
It would definitely wear ... but it would be stiff and as it's nylon non-permeable ... i.e. sweaty.
The sweaty part is what I am worried about.

My shop is not air conditioned.  
It is heated.

So in the summer when it is 100* or more that would be an issue.

To everyone else's point I didn't know that it was static-electrically conductive.

Might have to reconsider this.
Peter

My "day job"
Reply
#19
  Re: RE: Shop apron by Peter Tremblay ([quote='Dan Moening'...)
(02-21-2018, 03:35 PM)Peter Tremblay Wrote: The sweaty part is what I am worried about.

My shop is not air conditioned.  
It is heated.

So in the summer when it is 100* or more that would be an issue.

To everyone else's point I didn't know that it was static-electrically conductive.

Might have to reconsider this.

You can take a piece and rub it against your hair to test its conductivity.  If your hair stands up, attracted to the cloth, it's conductive.  If not, go ahead and use it.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
Reply
#20
  Re: RE: Shop apron by Peter Tremblay ([quote='Dan Moening'...)
(02-21-2018, 03:35 PM)Peter Tremblay Wrote: The sweaty part is what I am worried about.

My shop is not air conditioned.  
It is heated.

So in the summer when it is 100* or more that would be an issue.

To everyone else's point I didn't know that it was static-electrically conductive.

Might have to reconsider this.

,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
I know nothing about the material but I much prefer that my shop aprons have a top pocket that is sewn to the main body of the apron at the top only...This is a "carry over" from my old machinist aprons..You can put your scale or micrometer in it and when you have to bend over, they wont fall out..the pocket just "swings down" and the tools stay "put"....Dropping a measuring device is never good but can be death to a good micrometer!!
"The safest place in Korea is behind a platoon of Marine Riflemen...Lord, how those boys could fight ! Maj.Gen. Frank Lowe U.S. Army, in a communique to Pres. Harry Truman..


Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea 51/52





Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)