More garage wiring help please
#11
  
The garage was wired with a single GFCI receptacle.  The remaining 10 receptacles are protected off the load side of the first receptacle.  I plan to double the number of receptacles on the circuit, but putting receptacles every 6' rather than every 12'.  Is there a limit to how many receptacles I can run off the load side of a GFCI receptacle?

Would there be an advantage to installing a GFCI breaker instead?

The breaker box is in the center of the garage.  Currently the wire comes out of the breaker and runs easterly, then continues around the perimeter of the garage.  The Square D breakers can be double tapped.  Therefore, I could run a second wire westerly, and go 1/2 way around the perimeter each direction.  This would half the number of receptacles off of the load side of the first GFCI receptacle.

I will be installing 20 amp receptacles.

I removed the hardwired 8' florescent lights and replaced with a number of switched receptacles, which I am plugging 4' LED lights into (this is done).  Even though the receptacles are in the ceiling, I plan on protecting these with GFCI as well.  I picked up a Harbor Freight solar motion light for emergency lighting.  I have been using on of these in my shed, and they work well.  Not very bright, but they server their purpose.

Thanks again for the help.
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#12
  Re: More garage wiring help please by Cecil (The garage was wired...)
I am not aware of any specific limitation on the number of outlets that can be on any one General Purpose circuit. Question – does your garage have a separate dedicated circuit/outlet for a refrigerator or freezer? If not – and one day someone wants to install one – that could be an issue.

As far as ground-fault protection – outlets run off the GFCI self-contained in the first outlet or at the breaker – don't think that matters either way.
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#13
  Re: RE: More garage wiring help please by Don_M ([size=medium][size=m...)
(03-03-2018, 06:28 PM)Don_M Wrote: Question – does your garage have a separate dedicated circuit/outlet for a refrigerator or freezer? If not – and one day someone wants to install one – that could be an issue.

There is no separate dedicated circuit or outlet.  I do not believe that to be an issue though.  Between the garage and the kitchen is a multi-purpose room: mud room, coat room, laundry, pantry, storage, which has a dedicated freezer outlet.
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#14
  Re: More garage wiring help please by Cecil (The garage was wired...)
No limit to the number of receptacles. I would add another circuit if at all possible though. 

    A gfci outlet will do what you need. GFCI breakers are less likely to nuissance trip. If it were me and this is a workshop area I would not put in a gfci except when I go to sell the house. Also gfci on lighting is not a good idea nor is it needed. It can actually be dangerous if it trips when you are working out there. The only time I ever did a gfci on lighting was on walk in coolers and even then it's just nice to do as many have metal conduit and it's very bad about filling with condensation to the point where the pipe will be full of water.
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#15
  Re: RE: More garage wiring help please by Robert Adams (No limit to the numb...)
(03-03-2018, 08:15 PM)Robert Adams Wrote: No limit to the number of receptacles. I would add another circuit if at all possible though. 

    A gfci outlet will do what you need. GFCI breakers are less likely to nuissance trip. If it were me and this is a workshop area I would not put in a gfci except when I go to sell the house. Also gfci on lighting is not a good idea nor is it needed. It can actually be dangerous if it trips when you are working out there. The only time I ever did a gfci on lighting was on walk in coolers and even then it's just nice to do as many have metal conduit and it's very bad about filling with condensation to the point where the pipe will be full of water.

Setting it up so that I can quickly add a GCFI when I sell is a great idea.  Glad I though of that!

I will be adding a second 110 circuit.  Every place there is currently a box on the wall, and all the new ones between, I will put in a double.  I will have two circuits in each box, color coding the receptacles.  I am using deep boxes so that I don't have an issue with wire count.  I am also adding a 220 loop, plus 2 dedicated 220, for dust collection and air compressor.   

Based on your suggestion, I believe I will put in GFCI on each end, near the doors.  When I sell I will simply move the hot and neutral conductors from the Wago connectors to the load side of the GFCI.

Thanks.  Problem solved!
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#16
  Re: More garage wiring help please by Cecil (The garage was wired...)
(03-03-2018, 05:20 PM)Cecil Wrote: The garage was wired with a single GFCI receptacle.  The remaining 10 receptacles are protected off the load side of the first receptacle.  I plan to double the number of receptacles on the circuit, but putting receptacles every 6' rather than every 12'.  Is there a limit to how many receptacles I can run off the load side of a GFCI receptacle?

Would there be an advantage to installing a GFCI breaker instead?

The breaker box is in the center of the garage.  Currently the wire comes out of the breaker and runs easterly, then continues around the perimeter of the garage.  The Square D breakers can be double tapped.  Therefore, I could run a second wire westerly, and go 1/2 way around the perimeter each direction.  This would half the number of receptacles off of the load side of the first GFCI receptacle.

I will be installing 20 amp receptacles.

I removed the hardwired 8' florescent lights and replaced with a number of switched receptacles, which I am plugging 4' LED lights into (this is done).  Even though the receptacles are in the ceiling, I plan on protecting these with GFCI as well.  I picked up a Harbor Freight solar motion light for emergency lighting.  I have been using on of these in my shed, and they work well.  Not very bright, but they server their purpose.

Thanks again for the help.

1.  My understanding is all general pupose outlets in a garage must be ground faulted.

2.  Check the rating of the first gfc outlet.  More than likely it is a 15 amp outlet as those are more common.  Not sure what the rating is for a pass through current on a gfc outlet, but to me it doesn't make a lot of sense to add 20 amp outlets to a circuit that has a 15 amp limitation.   

Best to check with the AHJ before hand so you are not surprised when you have it inspected.

edit: never mind, I see you are going a different direction.......
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#17
  Re: RE: More garage wiring help please by srv52761 ([quote='Cecil' pid='...)
(03-03-2018, 09:07 PM)srv52761 Wrote: 1.  My understanding is all general pupose outlets in a garage must be ground faulted.

2.  Check the rating of the first gfc outlet.  More than likely it is a 15 amp outlet as those are more common.  Not sure what the rating is for a pass through current on a gfc outlet, but to me it doesn't make a lot of sense to add 20 amp outlets to a circuit that has a 15 amp limitation.   

Best to check with the AHJ before hand so you are not surprised when you have it inspected.

edit: never mind, I see you are going a different direction.......

1- I have been reading code, and yes, outlets in a garage must be ground faulted.  The exemption for ceiling outlets was removed in 2008.

2- The existing GFCI outlet is 15 amp.  I will replace it with a 20 amp outlet. 

The inspection stamp on my entrance panel is 1995, so I will be grandfathered in for the ceiling outlets, but I will have less problems with any bank if I do it right, or at least set it up so it can be made right quickly.
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#18
  Re: RE: More garage wiring help please by Cecil ([quote='srv52761' pi...)
(03-03-2018, 10:34 PM)Cecil Wrote: 1- I have been reading code, and yes, outlets in a garage must be ground faulted.  The exemption for ceiling outlets was removed in 2008.

2- The existing GFCI outlet is 15 amp.  I will replace it with a 20 amp outlet. 

The inspection stamp on my entrance panel is 1995, so I will be grandfathered in for the ceiling outlets, but I will have less problems with any bank if I do it right, or at least set it up so it can be made right quickly.

 Is this a 20 amp circuit ?   If it is you can use a 20 amp outlet.   Both 15 amp and 20 amp receptacles can be used on a 20 amp circuit.    A 20 amp receptacle should not be used on a 15 amp circuit.   Roly
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#19
  Re: RE: More garage wiring help please by Roly ([quote='Cecil' pid='...)
(03-03-2018, 10:50 PM)Roly Wrote:  Is this a 20 amp circuit ?   If it is you can use a 20 amp outlet.   Both 15 amp and 20 amp receptacles can be used on a 20 amp circuit.    A 20 amp receptacle should not be used on a 15 amp circuit.   Roly

Yep.  12 gauge wire, 20 amp breaker.  The lights are on 15 amp.  They had 12 and 14 gauge wire on that branch.  I replaced all the 12 gauge, especially to the breaker box.  I could see someone attaching the 12 gauge wire to a 20 amp breaker at some later date.  Now all the wire on that branch is 14 gauge.  I finished the lighting today.
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#20
  Re: More garage wiring help please by Cecil (The garage was wired...)
And to add to the confusion, all outlets in new construction, as of 2016, must be tamper resistant if under 5.5 feet from the floor.
The inspector also required ach fault and ground fault breakers in my garage. Those were expensive.
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