Any realtors in the house?
#11
  
I am going to be selling my house in about two years. I need to gradually update some things though I am not going to go into full remodeling mode. One of those things is repainting some areas of the interior. I have always heard that it is better to have pretty subdued color schemes for selling. Is that still pretty much the standard opinion? It would require expanding my planned painting as some of the more recently painted rooms have pretty bold colors – burgundy in the dining room and dark colors in the master bedroom. It isn’t impossible, but I like the look and would hate to live for however long in a ‘boring’ house if unnecessary.

It is a 1920s Craftsman Style Bungalow, 1.5 story if that makes any difference.

Pedro
I miss nested quotes..........
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#12
  Re: Any realtors in the house? by PedroOhare (I am going to be sel...)
As a buyer when looking at houses... When I see the interior pics and see bedrooms painted pink, blue or a strong red all I think is eww why didn't they repaint that before listing as that is a ding against the house. Same goes with ugly greens and the red accent wall people thought was cool 20 years ago. 
     Conservative is always good, bold in your face colors attack you when you walk in and you feel less comfortable in the space. 
  
          That's probably at odds with what older realtors will tell you but I find most realtors these days are out of touch with what buyers are looking for. Most can't even take half way decent pictures of the properties ie using their phone in portrait mode etc...
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#13
  Re: Any realtors in the house? by PedroOhare (I am going to be sel...)
The consensus is (from what I read) that you want to keep it neutral and "depersonalize" the space.  

The "keep it neutral" is to make it acceptable to the broadest group of buyers.  A black painted ceiling might appeal greatly to a very few people, but it will essentially turn off a great many.  Beige, whites and the latest "greige" (warm tones of gray) are "safe".  

I've also read that you should "depersonalize" the space.  Anything (furniture, paintings, portraits, etc.) that is uniquely yours should be hidden from view.  I'm not sure that concept makes as much sense as the neutral color concept does, but if you have a cowboy saddle mounted on a base to use as a counter stool, then perhaps some conventional stool would work.

I had a friend that used all mechanics storage drawers for his bedroom furniture.  It was practical and sturdy, but too unique for many people to overlook. (Personally, I loved it.)


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#14
  Re: Any realtors in the house? by PedroOhare (I am going to be sel...)
I look at a bunch of houses. Gray and white are "in". I've seen a ton of homes with wood kitchen cabinets painted gray. Walls painted a lighter gray, white trim. The wimminz love it.

This is a house I inspected today. Not a great neighborhood but recently updated. It's a flip ,one of the better ones I've seen. Sold last October at a bank sale for $150k. Take a look at the kitchen and baths. That's what's "in" and these "in" houses sell quickly. 22 days on the market. Sold last Sunday but there was another buyer that fell through. Went back on the market last Saturday and sold the next day. Gray vinyl plank flooring. Everything freshly painted. Fresh paint on the foundation and exterior door frames. New cheap exterior doors with factory white paint, front door was painted. Sold Sunday for $299k. The key sales feature is always "move in ready" and "location". This house was move in eady and the location is just ok but not terrible.

Zillow

The "flippers" als knew what inspectors likt to see. Almost everything was addressed. A couple nickle dome things were missed, no anti-siphon hose bib valves, evaporator condensate pipe runs uphill. A couple other things in the service panel but nothing that can't be fixed in a day.
Good judgement comes from experience.
Experience comes from poor judgement.

Neil Summers Home Inspections
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#15
  Re: RE: Any realtors in the house? by Snipe Hunter (I look at a bunch of...)
(04-13-2018, 06:06 PM)Snipe Hunter Wrote: I look at a bunch of houses. Gray and white are "in". I've seen a ton of homes with wood kitchen cabinets painted gray. Walls painted a lighter gray, white trim. The wimminz love it.

This is a house I inspected today. Not a great neighborhood but recently updated. It's a flip ,one of the better ones I've seen. Sold last October at a bank sale for $150k. Take a look at the kitchen and baths. That's what's "in" and these "in" houses sell quickly. 22 days on the market. Sold last Sunday but there was another buyer that fell through. Went back on the market last Saturday and sold the next day. Gray vinyl plank flooring. Everything freshly painted. Fresh paint on the foundation and exterior door frames. New cheap exterior doors with factory white paint, front door was painted. Sold Sunday for $299k. The key sales feature is always "move in ready" and "location". This house was move in eady and the location is just ok but not terrible.

Zillow

The "flippers" als knew what inspectors likt to see. Almost everything was addressed. A couple nickle dome things were missed, no anti-siphon hose bib valves, evaporator condensate pipe runs uphill. A couple other things in the service panel but nothing that can't be fixed in a day.

I learned to leave a couple of inconsequential items undone for final inspections. Some inspectors and architects  just have to write down something, even if they have to invent it. Best to give them something that's easy to fix.

My boss is a Jewish carpenter. Our DADDY owns the business.
Trying to understand some people is like trying to pick up the clean end of a turd.
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#16
  Re: Any realtors in the house? by PedroOhare (I am going to be sel...)
If you were thinking of selling, do you tear out the twenty year old floor coverings throughout the place prior to the sale and put in what you like? Or is it better to discount about 15k so the buyer can choose what they want, be it carpet, wood, tile....
Jim in Virginia
You can tell a lot about the character of a man -
By the way he treats those who can do nothing for him.
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#17
  Re: RE: Any realtors in the house? by BrokenOlMarine (If you were thinking...)
(04-13-2018, 11:51 PM)BrokenOlMarine Wrote: If you were thinking of selling, do you tear out the twenty year old floor coverings throughout the place prior to the sale and put in what you like? Or is it better to discount about 15k so the buyer can choose what they want, be it carpet, wood, tile....

That is a bargaining chip in my opinion. Nine out of ten times the new owner will repaint as soon as they move in. If it is clean and uncluttered is all I want to see when buying. You can get a better sense of the walls and floors and their conditions. Sold my Mom's house 2 years ago when she passed and the very first thing the new owner did was tear out a perfectly good carpet in the living room and basement. Now the living room had an echo as it was but without the carpet to deaden sound I can only imagine what it sounded like. Today wood floors is in with white trim everywhere and stainless steel appliances. To me it is too sterile and I think it is like living in a hospital.
John T.
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#18
  Re: Any realtors in the house? by PedroOhare (I am going to be sel...)
Sherwin Williams Repose Grey or Revere Pewter by Benjamin Moore.
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#19
  Re: Any realtors in the house? by PedroOhare (I am going to be sel...)
grays are in. Whatever you do the new owner will change it. My boss just bought a house, and she is going to rip out the brand new kitchen and replace it.
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#20
  Re: RE: Any realtors in the house? by Foggy ([quote='Snipe Hunter...)
(04-13-2018, 10:05 PM)Foggy Wrote: I learned to leave a couple of inconsequential items undone for final inspections. Some inspectors and architects  just have to write down something, even if they have to invent it. Best to give them something that's easy to fix.

I put every defect I see in the report. I feel that my client paid for a complete inspection and that's what they get. IMHO, there really are no inconsequential defects when buying a home because they do cost money, time and other resources to fix. But I also categorize them all in a summary as not to frighten the buyer and choose my wording carefully. Most (not all) buyers don't know squat about a home so they'll have to rely on hired help for maintenance and repairs and me to let them know they currently exist or are imminent. I owe them accuracy and am compelled to do so by my state and insurer. Maryland follow a national standards of practice and I follow it, not all states do and some states have their own standard (Fla, Tex). Some states require no training at all and have not adopted any standards.

I list all findings in the summary, even the seemingly inconsequential stuff
"items not working" Just as it says, anything that isn't working.
"Improvement items" No HVAC source in rooms, missing or damaged window screens, slow drains, leaking faucets, no disconnects at HVAC equip, single pane windows, peeling paint, downspouts discharging close to the foundation, dirty rain gutters, dirty air filters etc
"Safety Hazards" Non GFCI or reverse polarity or open ground outlets, tripping hazards, none anti-siphon hose bibs, loose or missing handrails etc.
"Major concerns" Needs fixing now. Did one yesterday where the condensate line ran uphill.
"Items to monitor" Wood rot on deck posts, fences, water stains but no moisture detected etc
"Deferred cost items" Old HVAC, Roof, Windows etc

Anything that doesn't meet the national standard goes on the report.
This way they can budget for the future, take care of the "now" items or do nothing. But at least the have the information that they paid for.
Good judgement comes from experience.
Experience comes from poor judgement.

Neil Summers Home Inspections
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