Bandsaw Blade Question
#11
  
I may not be searching properly the site properly, but I can't seem to find very much info about bandsaw blades recommendations. I find it hard to believe it isn't there. Since it's such a common question. But I'm gona ask anyway. 

I just bought a Grizzly 0513X2BF. 131.5" length, 1" max width blade, many already know this saw. like a lot of guys, I'm looking to put a basic group of blades together. I've learned a lot from the advice given. And after going through all of the suggestions and learning more about them, I've decided not to go too terribly cheap on the blades. Some maybe, just depends. 

I'd like to be able to cut green wood. Definitely going to be a lot re-sawing and ripping. I'll need a blade for general straight cuts, thick and thin alike. Also some smooth cut curves both med & small. There's not much I won't be doing with these blaades. I think you all get the idea?

I'd really like to try the Lenox Trimaster. I have found carbide blades connected to links (like Highland Woodworking) but they don't actually 'say' Lenox. Is there such a huge difference to justify the price gap? Are they even Lenox or a knock off just as good - $ 4 $'s?

Bi-Metal has got my attention also.  Any input there? I was feeling good about the Woos SLicer, but after reading more I'm starting to have doubts.  They seem great, but many disagree or suggest better for various reasons.

So far I've found:
1/2" WoodSlicer - $32
1/4" 6 TPI ( hardened steel flex back) - $19.60
Wood Turner's 3/8" 3 TPI ,032 (for the green wood) - $25.99
1/8" flex back, 14TPI (for tight curves)  - $16.79
Premium Carbide Tipped BS, 1/2", 4 TPI, .025 - or would 3/4" inch be better? - $174

This list was put together before I seriously considered bi-metal. Which is what started the doubts once I learned more about it. I thought for the most part I could get this figured out after a few suggestions I was given prior. But now I'm just becoming more indecisive under the pressure of making a solid decision without more input or at least some options. There were others before these. Like the Timber Wolf, and Laguna's another I'm interested in. I'm not expecting perfect, if there is such a thing. I'd just rather start out smart. I likely won't have money for a while to purchase more blades, should there be regrets. So, what I get I'm stuck with for a while. :-) I figure I should get at least one higher end cabide tipped blade for general cuts that can take some abuse (maybe even as a second as a resaw blade?). And the rest I'm thinking Bi-Metal where I can? If I go with a nice cheaper blade, I figure I'll just buy two of them. Am I wrong? If I could stay between $3-$400 max for the group/set, I would be happy.

Also, how do you know if you can sharpen a blade or not?

Can anyone help suggest size, thickness, brand and for what function/use or have anything to ad? I figure 3-5 blades should be enough.  

Thank you ahead of time. Looking forward to anything anyone has to share.
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#12
  Re: Bandsaw Blade Question by SpiderDave (I may not be searchi...)
(04-18-2018, 04:30 PM)SpiderDave Wrote: I may not be searching properly the site properly, but I can't seem to find very much info about bandsaw blades recommendations. I find it hard to believe it isn't there. Since it's such a common question. But I'm gona ask anyway. 

I just bought a Grizzly 0513X2BF. 131.5" length, 1" max width blade, many already know this saw. like a lot of guys, I'm looking to put a basic group of blades together. I've learned a lot from the advice given. And after going through all of the suggestions and learning more about them, I've decided not to go too terribly cheap on the blades. Some maybe, just depends. 

I'd like to be able to cut green wood. Definitely going to be a lot re-sawing and ripping. I'll need a blade for general straight cuts, thick and thin alike. Also some smooth cut curves both med & small. There's not much I won't be doing with these blaades. I think you all get the idea?

I'd really like to try the Lenox Trimaster. I have found carbide blades connected to links (like Highland Woodworking) but they don't actually 'say' Lenox. Is there such a huge difference to justify the price gap? Are they even Lenox or a knock off just as good - $ 4 $'s?

Bi-Metal has got my attention also.  Any input there? I was feeling good about the Woos SLicer, but after reading more I'm starting to have doubts.  They seem great, but many disagree or suggest better for various reasons.

So far I've found:
1/2" WoodSlicer - $32
1/4" 6 TPI ( hardened steel flex back) - $19.60
Wood Turner's 3/8" 3 TPI ,032 (for the green wood) - $25.99
1/8" flex back, 14TPI (for tight curves)  - $16.79
Premium Carbide Tipped BS, 1/2", 4 TPI, .025 - or would 3/4" inch be better? - $174

This list was put together before I seriously considered bi-metal. Which is what started the doubts once I learned more about it. I thought for the most part I could get this figured out after a few suggestions I was given prior. But now I'm just becoming more indecisive under the pressure of making a solid decision without more input or at least some options. There were others before these. Like the Timber Wolf, and Laguna's another I'm interested in. I'm not expecting perfect, if there is such a thing. I'd just rather start out smart. I likely won't have money for a while to purchase more blades, should there be regrets. So, what I get I'm stuck with for a while. :-) I figure I should get at least one higher end cabide tipped blade for general cuts that can take some abuse (maybe even as a second as a resaw blade?). And the rest I'm thinking Bi-Metal where I can? If I go with a nice cheaper blade, I figure I'll just buy two of them. Am I wrong? If I could stay between $3-$400 max for the group/set, I would be happy.

Also, how do you know if you can sharpen a blade or not?

Can anyone help suggest size, thickness, brand and for what function/use or have anything to ad? I figure 3-5 blades should be enough.  

Thank you ahead of time. Looking forward to anything anyone has to share.

I used to use the band saw for an average of 5 hours a week, probably 15+ years. I have the 16" grizzly band saw that has been discontinued  in favor of machines with higher re-saw capacity. I have never used any of the expensive blades you mention ,I can't comment on them. I used the 113" standard Grizzly blades, 1-1/2 TPI, 3 TPI for re-sawing. Also a small variety of finer tooth blades. I still have several of the re-saw blades and a couple of 10 TPI and 14 TPI. I'm guessing on the finer tooth Blades  as I am not near the shop to check.
I sharpen the re-saw blades only. Finer tooth blades would be difficult and not worth my time.
Sharpening the 3TPI or 1-1/2 TPI blades is easy to learn. Takes me about 12/15 minutes per blade.
I have used a chain saw cylinder shape grinding wheel in a Dremel Tool to sharpen the tips and the gullets at the same time. The blades are made in the rip fashion so no bevel is involved. The tool is moved in and out at 90° generally 4 times. Another words in and back .in and back gives you 4 times. Usually this will sharpen the tips and gullets better than when the blade was new as it is now ground instead of punched out.
First thing is to vacuum the saw dust so a fire can't start. Then mark one tooth with a white grease pencil or a piece of tape. This is the last tooth . Raise the guide up as far as it will go. Hold the tool level and push the tool in and out ,total 4 strokes. Repeat til you get to the last tooth. 
I recently bought a diamond cylinder shape to take the place of the chain saw hone which wears down fast. I used 1 of the chain saw hones to 2 blades. The diamond hone should last longer. I believe Arlin recommended the diamond hone. I haven't had a chance yet to use it.
Hope this helps, mike
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#13
  Re: Bandsaw Blade Question by SpiderDave (I may not be searchi...)
Dave,  first, congratulations on the saw,  I have the GO513x2, which was an earlier version.  While they say it can handle 1 inch blades,  I found it took quite a bit of effort to get them on and off the saw, so I no longer buy 1 inch.  

As you know, there are carbon steel,  then bimetal, then carbide.  The carbon steel dulls the quickest, followed by bimetal, then the carbide.  On the other hand, if you hit a nail, or get a catch, you can ruin any of them pretty quick.  I have read that bimetal is the best bang for the buck, and unless you want to spend $600 to $800, you might not want to buy a bunch of different carbide blades.

If you want to cut green wood, that would certainly be a different blade than the rest.

For resawing, I  have a Laguna Resaw King,  it is pretty expensive, but leaves a nice surface, and my thought was that for resawing, I want a blade that will last a long time.  In contrast, if I wanted a blade for curves, which I don't ,  it would most likely be used on 1 inch stock or less, and so it would get 12 times less wear than a resaw blade cutting a 12 inch deep cut. ( hope that made sense)

Some love timberwolf, others say they dull quickly.  Others love the Lennox Diemaster,  I have bought a few, but mine seemed to dull very quickly.

My suggestion is to get 1 green wood blade, 1 general purpose blade, and 1 resaw ( carbide ),  and see how you like them.

BTW, I have made a few mods to my saw, if you are interested, let me know and I will post some details.
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#14
  Re: Bandsaw Blade Question by SpiderDave (I may not be searchi...)
I've used several different blades on my two bandsaws, a 14" Delta and a 17" Grizzly monster, the G0636X.  The smoothest, fastest cutting resaw blade I have used is a Woodmaster CT, which is carbide tipped. I had a 1", 1.3 one.  This blade is a wood eating machine.  If you are confident you can tension a 1" blade that's 0.035" thick, then that's a great blade to consider.   The Trimaster has a lot of fans, but it won't cut nearly as fast in thick stock and it won't cut any smoother.  If you can't tension a 1" blade then you could go with the 3/4", 2 tpi blade.  You can buy the Woodmaster CT for substantially less than a Laguna Resaw King, at least they were for the 162" length I need.  But the Resaw King would be a good option if you wanted to try a 1" blade because it's a lot thinner.  

After the CT broke (at the weld and the supplier wouldn't offer me anything) I decided to go down and dirty and try some cheap blades on the Grizzly.  I'm using a Woodmaster C 1", 2 tpi blade right now for resawing and slicing veneer.  It cuts more slowly although still plenty adequate and isn't quite as smooth as the CT, but it costs about $25 vs. $150.  Plus I can resharpen it, or just buy 6 of them for the same price.  I bought a 1.3 tpi C as well, but haven't tried it yet.  However, I did try a Woodmaster GT 1", 1.3 tpi.  This blade is made specifically for bandsaw mills cutting green wood.  As you might guess, it doesn't cut as smoothly as the 2 tpi Woodmaster C.  I have a 2 tpi version of that blade as well, but haven't run it yet.  These blades are cheap, too, less than $25 each.   I have not tried a bimetal blade on the Grizzly yet.  They are in the $80 range and didn't meet my down and dirty criteria.   

I tried a couple of Diemaster 2 (bimetal) blades on my Delta, 1/2", 3 tpi.  They cut OK but didn't last as long as the Olson MVP blades I used before that.  Those blades lasted a very long time, althought the Diemaster 2 cut more smoothly.  Right now I'm using some 1/2", 4 tpi Starrett blades on the Delta, just carbon steel I think, don't know for sure because I got them for free, and they are very impressive.  They cut great and are very durable.  

My opinion of the Woodslicer is it cuts great - as long as your wood is completely stable and doesn't cup or bow in the cut.  Apparently much of the wood I use isn't that well behaved and I had lots problems with it binding in the kerf, which was a real PITA to get loose.  Worthless to me.  I didn't even use it long enough to find out how durable it is, but from what I've read it isn't too good.  

I had two Timberwolf blades on my Delta, a 1/4", 4 tpi and a 1/2" 3/4 tpi (I think).  Both broke in not all that long, neither at the weld.  I set them up per the recommended low tension flutter method so they were not over tensioned.  They cut great while I used them, but the low life made me look elsewhere.  FWIW, those are the only blades that I have ever broke on the Delta.  

That's my experience.

John

Oh yeah, if you buy a Woodmaster CT, Connecticut Saw and Tool can sharpen them. They sell them, too.
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#15
Photo    Re: Bandsaw Blade Question by SpiderDave (I may not be searchi...)
I purchased my Laguna 18BX in January and spent a lot of time doing research on blades so know how mind-boggling it can be.  My saw takes a 145" length, and 1/8" to 1-1/4" width blade.  

My primary blades are the bi-metal Lenox Diemaster 2 blades, 1/2" 4tpi and 1/4" 6tpi ($103 from bandsawbladesdirect.com with free shipping over $100).  I chose these blades for longevity and quality of cut and am quite satisfied with each.  While the initial purchase may be more than carbon or other blades, the longer life of the bi-metal construction should make these blades a more economical overall choice, particularly with cut quality taken into account.  While I had originally considered getting additional blades, I decided to limit my initial purchase to two and evaluate my uses and needs, then once experienced with what they will and possibly might not do, fine tune a future purchase.  Thus far though, these two blades have fit my needs quite well.  

I am considering the possibility of adding a carbon 3/16" blade either 10tpi or 14tpi ($14.25 from woodcraftbands.com) and a Carter Stabilizer to do some tinkering with and fill the gap between the scroll saw and my present bandsaw blades.

For general resaw work, I chose the 1" Laguna Resaw King ($175 from Laguna with free shipping).  The RK provides a fine-finish superb cut and the long life of the carbide teeth, along with the ability to be resharpen ($45) several times should provide good value and quality for the cost.  While my saw is rated to take a wider blade, I prefer not to work within the upper limits of my equipment so went 1/4" smaller and have been quite satisfied.

I am presently in the process of researching additional resaw blades for two tasks.

The first is a blade to resaw 4" to 10" wide 8/4 lumber that I am reclaiming from a former one-room schoolhouse.  While I will be checking the wood both visually and with a detector & doing my best to avoid nails and metal, I am likely to end up with some questionable wood in which the blade could strike something.  For the questionable wood I don't want to risk ruining the Resaw King blade so am considering using either a less expensive blade that can be considered expendable, or a bi-metal blade with a slightly moderate tooth count that may be able to survive inadvertent contact with metal.

The second is a blade to mill / resaw an occasional log section (2' +/- long) in which the boards will be dried and utilized in a variety of craft and smaller projects.  I have a 103 acre tree farm and would like to make use of the occasional tree that falls instead of allowing it to lay on the ground and rot.    While my plan is to eventually purchase a portable sawmill, it isn't presently in the budget and I would like to start doing some tinkering around with a few log sections in the meantime.

Good luck in your search and I am following and increasing my personal knowledge base in the feedback here.


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#16
  Re: Bandsaw Blade Question by SpiderDave (I may not be searchi...)
Why is it that when I read what you fella's all wrote, it made more sense to me? ha! Thanks for that! I appreciate you taking time, not mention 'why and how's' (in & outs) from your point of experience. Gives me a far better sense of it, rather than just sterile info.  As well as a reason to retain it better. Much appreciated.

Definitely got a few answers I had on the sharpening, thanks Mike. I was thinking diamond bit on a rotary tool also. I have a dremel tool on steroids that'll do nicely. I'm definitely looking to sharpen a blade if I can.And that did help, thanks

BattleRidge, nice building. Wish I had an extra space to tinker with like that. I have a decent sized shop but it was already full. I'm currently expanding from metal work to wood, sharing already limited space. I'd forgotten about metal detecting before cutting. My wife has one of those little hand held med sized flash light sized detectors for sifting through handfuls of dirt while metal detecting. Would something like that work or what do you use? I only have 3/4 acre. I dream about being able to go cut a fallen tree and make something from it. I did with the trees here when we cleaned up the place. But now it's done and there're no more junk trees left. Now I just rubber neck at other people's tree wondering if they'd want it cut down or I make a mental note to keep an eye out - just in case they cut it. Ha! A guy can dream.

Yup, I read that my saw takes 1" but it's on the edge. So I'l stay with 3/4" and play it safe.  My biggest problem is that I'm diving into the use of my bandsaw head first with no time to get to know it and/or the blades. I will, but as I go. I need to be able to do what ever comes to mind and go with it. That's why I needed such a wide range to start rather than order a couple, get a feel for them, go from there. Which is what I'd rather do but funds are running out. And if I can build what come to mind asap, then I can get more funds. Also buying the Grizzly Spindle Sander din't help either, but glad I did. Love it!

I was terminated/laid off from my job after 16yrs due to downsizing. Only missed 2 days work in that time. So, I've been building a shop over the course of 8 yrs and I'm about a month away from finishing it enough to use it. Then I'll be up and running. I'm trying to make a long shot toss into the basket before the buzzer goes off here and see if I can make this work. I'm one of those artsy fartsy guy's that does metal sculpture and fabrication. I've been hoarding antiques, vintage and modern metal this entire time - whatever I could get my hands on. I'll be making table, lamps and some furniture with both new and reclaimed lumber as well as reclaimed and new metal. Some will be from trees donated, hence the green cutting. Some beams and various old woods. I plan on a few sculpture's with wood blended with the metal also. I've picked up a few small jobs to help pay for the saw and sander that were already ordered before I got my walking papers. With the blade selection, I'm hoping to have a decent circle of options so I can make what I need on a whim. Some things are planned, other's not. I just like saying, "Yes, I can do that". It's what I've always done -rarely ever by choice - and it's worked out well for me. So, I'm kinda crossing my fingers here. All the plans I have together, I honestly can't think of any cuts I won't be doing. Anyway, that's why I'm diving in so 'head first' into this blade selection. Trying to save the farm.  Ha.

I wanted to try that Woodmaster CT, but only found it in 1"-2". That's why I had the carbide one from on my list to substitute. Wondering if it would be close enough or not?  HIghland woodworking Premium Carbide-Tipped Bandsaw Blade - Highland Item # 18741315 @ $174.00 I'm researching the rest. Most I heard of, but am reconsidering again now. Thank you.

What's a good blade to cut plastic, clear acrylic etc? 1/4" 14-16 TPI?

I do struggle with choosing blade thickness. Is it best to choose thicker when you need stability cutting straight, or for curves? Or thinner for curves? Or does it depend on how thick of a piece your cutting a curve in? If so how do you factor than in choosing a blade and how does it translate into choosing other larger blades?  Take your pick, ha! I'm full of questions.

I do appreciate everything you've giving me to chew on and consider here so far. Most importantly which blade I can afford to go cheaper on and which I should invest more into. (like 4 cheaper blades being equal to one expensive blade, in a manor of speaking) I wish I could start out with just a couple blades. But I don't have that luxury. I have a few serious leads I'd like to pursue, but I can't if I don't have everything absolutely ready with my ducks in a row. Usually when I start something it has a history snowballing. I like to keep the momentum going, especially where works concerned as one job leads into another and so on. I'm still looking for a real job, but until then I'm gona hit this thing hard as I can with as much as I can learn. :-) Sorry was such a long reply. Not really keeping it all about the blades here, I guess. Just wanted to explain why I might seem to have high expectations.
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#17
  Re: RE: Bandsaw Blade Question by barryvabeach (Dave,  first, congra...)
(04-18-2018, 07:24 PM)barryvabeach Wrote: Dave,  first, congratulations on the saw,  I have the GO513x2, which was an earlier version. ........
.......BTW, I have made a few mods to my saw, if you are interested, let me know and I will post some details.

Hiya Barry! Yes I definitely would like to see your mods! Please. I would be curious to see them. So far I made the dolly for it. Dug around in my scrap bin and parts boxes. It's waaay over kill for a machine this small but it'll last forever for the next guy. Ha! It's what I had on hand and it works like a charm. Was glad to get rid of those pieces for a project anyway. I would've bought the Grizzly dolly but I wanted the larger 4" wheels on mine, in case I ran over a small piece of whatever on the floor and have the saw come to a halt. It glides like butter. Plus, I have a bad back. The anchor knobs (red) are solid steel gears. If I kick or graze them with my shoe, they'll spin to the floor. A light nudge if even needed and they're tightened down. Doesn't take much and saves my back from bending over. Even if you use your hands, they're still faster because they have the weight to spin freely up or down with a flick or two. Did the same for the Spindle Sander too. Got rid of some old spray paint even. 

I've been putting together a goose neck lamp I got from Goodwill for $2.00. Two Harbor Freight pwr magnets on an  'L' shaped 2" band metal. It takes a bit of pull to get it off actually, holds very well. It's removable in case I change my mind. I didn't want to be drilling into anything until I at least get a few scratches on it first. heh.

I think you may have told me about a mod for the fence handle once a while back? I did remember that mod. Genius. Lookin' forward to seeing what you did. 

Trying to put a photo in with this. But lately it just wont let me. grrr! Is there a trick to it? Never had a problem before.
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#18
  Re: Bandsaw Blade Question by SpiderDave (I may not be searchi...)
   
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#19
  Re: Bandsaw Blade Question by SpiderDave (I may not be searchi...)
Dave

That is the same frame as mine (G0636X - 17" Ultimate Bandsaw)

I always get the Timber Wolf bandsaw blades and never been disappointed and can be sharpened many times of which I posted in Power tools. I also round over the back of the blade with a stone to round the back edges off since that causes stress cracks or fractures and make the blade break faster.

Here is the one for yours and for cutting logs or green wood I would highly recommend the 1/2" x 3 or 4 tpi

http://www.grizzly.com/products/131-1-2-...ade/T25031

For resawing I like this one

http://www.grizzly.com/products/131-1-2-...lade/H8597

The above one is 10tpi and I like the 6 to 8 tpi one better but Grizzly does not carry the Timber wolf in that size

There is one in the carbon steel section

http://www.grizzly.com/products/131-1-2-...lade/H4810

or their carbide imbedded which I really like but not the price

http://www.grizzly.com/products/131-1-2-...ade/T25081

or this one

http://www.grizzly.com/products/131-1-2-...ade/T24785

Hope this helps
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#20
  Re: RE: Bandsaw Blade Question by Arlin Eastman (Dave That is the sa...)
(04-19-2018, 10:20 PM)Arlin Eastman Wrote: Dave

That is the same frame as mine (G0636X - 17" Ultimate Bandsaw)

I always get the Timber Wolf bandsaw blades and never been disappointed and can be sharpened many times of which I posted in Power tools.  I also round over the back of the blade with a stone to round the back edges off since that causes stress cracks or fractures and make the blade break faster.

Here is the one for yours and for cutting logs or green wood I would highly recommend the 1/2" x 3 or 4 tpi

http://www.grizzly.com/products/131-1-2-...ade/T25031

For resawing I like this one

http://www.grizzly.com/products/131-1-2-...lade/H8597

The above one is 10tpi and I like the 6 to 8 tpi one better but Grizzly does not carry the Timber wolf in that size

There is one in the carbon steel section

http://www.grizzly.com/products/131-1-2-...lade/H4810

or their carbide imbedded which I really like but not the price

http://www.grizzly.com/products/131-1-2-...ade/T25081

or this one

http://www.grizzly.com/products/131-1-2-...ade/T24785

Hope this helps

Thanks Arlin, that's really laid out well, I went through each one. What are your preferred uses on the last 3 listed? Nice being able to find blades you like all at the same location. Nice n' simple, one stop shop. 

I did remember originally reading that the frame on the G0513X2BF was reinforced or improved somehow. But when I tried to find that info later while blade hunting for a 1", I couldn't find it.  I was just looking at your machine,... nice! So, then I should be able to handle a 1" blade if I choose to try it? I also read that a 1" blade would be max width for the wheels. That it would be so close to the wheel metal lip and at the max width of the tire that it could potentially damage the teeth on your blade if it weren't tracking properly or not having realestate to offset for the width the teeth add to the blade? I would certainly get the tracking correct before turning it on. But that did make me think about having margin for error,.. or am I over thinking this? I probably should've went out to the shop an measured it before I even asked. 

I am curious - aside from the teeth just being too small to bother with - how do you know whether a blade can or cannot be sharpened? I sharpen my carbide circular saws, but then that's an easy angle to match and grind with plenty of space between also. I did notice some carbide bandsaw teeth had an interesting grind pattern that may not be so easily matched. Or maybe it just comes down to time not worth it when you can just buy one so reasonably - to justify it being a consumable basically? If anyone has input on that, I'd be very interested in hearing it.

Thanks every one!
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