Resaw blade on acrylic
#11
  
I have a Woodslicer resaw blade on my bandsaw.  I am cutting out some acrylic windows for a sailboat.  I just did a rough cut on the first window using the bandsaw.  It worked out well but am concerned at what the acrylic is doing to this blade.  Would cutting 3/16" cast acrylic dull a resaw blade quickly?
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#12
  Re: Resaw blade on acrylic by photobug (I have a Woodslicer ...)
(06-01-2018, 03:22 PM)photobug Wrote: I have a Woodslicer resaw blade on my bandsaw.  I am cutting out some acrylic windows for a sailboat.  I just did a rough cut on the first window using the bandsaw.  It worked out well but am concerned at what the acrylic is doing to this blade.  Would cutting 3/16" cast acrylic dull a resaw blade quickly?

Cutting air will dull a WoodSlicer.

And you probably don't have enough TPI.  You want at least a couple of teeth in the material at all times.  So for thinner stock, you need a lot of teeth per inch.
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#13
  Re: RE: Resaw blade on acrylic by Phil Thien ([quote='photobug' pi...)
(06-01-2018, 03:24 PM)Phil Thien Wrote: Cutting air will dull a WoodSlicer.

And you probably don't have enough TPI.  You want at least a couple of teeth in the material at all times.  So for thinner stock, you need a lot of teeth per inch.

I am just using it to get close to a line, will then use a template and router to get right shape.

I had used my jig saw in the past and it did not go so well,  the blade broke many sheets of acrylic, because of chatter.  If the acrylic is not particularly tough on a bandsaw blade, I will just use one.  I did just get my small 3 wheel bandsaw out of storage, I may try that one, ruin that blade.  I do have a quality backup resaw blade for when the air dulls the Woodslicer.
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#14
  Re: Resaw blade on acrylic by photobug (I have a Woodslicer ...)
The problem w/ not enough teeth isn't only cut quality, but also a bit of safety.

Because with fewer teeth, it is possible to advance the material fast enough that a tooth will attempt to take too much bite.  This can result in broken blades and shattered material.
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#15
  Re: Resaw blade on acrylic by photobug (I have a Woodslicer ...)
(06-01-2018, 03:22 PM)photobug Wrote: I have a Woodslicer resaw blade on my bandsaw.  I am cutting out some acrylic windows for a sailboat.  I just did a rough cut on the first window using the bandsaw.  It worked out well but am concerned at what the acrylic is doing to this blade.  Would cutting 3/16" cast acrylic dull a resaw blade quickly?

I don't think acrylic will dull the blade any more than wood will.  I've cut 1/4" acrylic with tiny scroll saw blades.  Other than avoiding melt back in the kerf, it didn't cut much different than wood.  However, I agree that a blade with a higher TPI count would do a better job.
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#16
  Re: RE: Resaw blade on acrylic by Bill Wilson ([quote='photobug' pi...)
(06-01-2018, 03:44 PM)Bill Wilson Wrote: I don't think acrylic will dull the blade any more than wood will.  I've cut 1/4" acrylic with tiny scroll saw blades.  Other than avoiding melt back in the kerf, it didn't cut much different than wood.  However, I agree that a blade with a higher TPI count would do a better job.

I am not sure what I used in the past.  This acrylic was sold at a premium because it is cast not extruded.  It did not melt like I had troubles in the past.  I think it is a superior product easier to work with.

I have only changed this blade once, it was a pain. I don't think I will be making any blade changes for just one cut.
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#17
  Re: Resaw blade on acrylic by photobug (I have a Woodslicer ...)
Too many teeth will heat and melt the plastic, which will then re-fuse behind the blade.

On the TS, I cut plastics using a 50-60 tooth blade, high ATB.
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#18
  Re: Resaw blade on acrylic by photobug (I have a Woodslicer ...)
When I had my picture framing shop we would cut acrylic by scoring deeply with a carbide tipped tool (like they use for cutting Formica).

With thicker material I would score on both sides.  And then snap.  

If you need a really smooth edge, then use a router to clean it up.

If you need a polished edge, then flame polishing works great.
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#19
  Re: Resaw blade on acrylic by photobug (I have a Woodslicer ...)
I bought a second cheap bandsaw, slowed the speed down, installed a metal cutting blade and use it for metal, wood and plastics. Haven't had any trouble with overheating plastics under 1/8" thick.
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#20
  Re: RE: Resaw blade on acrylic by Bill Wilson ([quote='photobug' pi...)
(06-01-2018, 03:44 PM)Bill Wilson Wrote: I don't think acrylic will dull the blade any more than wood will.  I've cut 1/4" acrylic with tiny scroll saw blades.  Other than avoiding melt back in the kerf, it didn't cut much different than wood.  However, I agree that a blade with a higher TPI count would do a better job.

What Bill said.  In the military I cut everything from 1.5" down to 3/16.  Always keep the pull protector plastic on it which will help keep if from cracking.
Then the teeth would be anything from 8tpi to 10 would work best anything more will clog up the teeth and anything less might crack the acrylic since it is more of a chopping cut then.
Last let the acrylic feed itself and not push very heavy with it or it will melt and reseal itself or chip around the edges.
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