Another Resawing Question
#5
  
I have some 2" thick white pine I want to resaw into 7/8" stock for secondary wood on a project I'm working on. The pine was kiln dried and it has been sitting in my shop for 6 months. My plan is to skip plane the faces and joint one edge before resawing. I understand that thick boards want to cup if reasawn down the center with no (or very little) stock removed from the outside faces. Can I prevent this by clamping the resawn boards to sturdy, flat stickers while they reacclimatize to my shop environment? How long should I let them sit after resawing to stabilize?

TIA

Hank
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#6
  Re: Another Resawing Question by Hank Knight (I have some 2" thick...)
(06-15-2018, 10:01 AM)Hank Knight Wrote: I have some 2" thick white pine I want to resaw into 7/8" stock for secondary wood on a project I'm working on. The pine was kiln dried and it has been sitting in my shop for 6 months. My plan is to skip plane the faces and joint one edge before resawing. I understand that thick boards want to cup if reasawn down the center with no (or very little) stock removed from the outside faces. Can I prevent this by clamping the resawn boards to sturdy, flat stickers while they reacclimatize to my shop environment? How long should I let them sit after resawing to stabilize?

"Secondary wood" suggests it won't be used in any great width, unless it's for deep drawers, where the joinery will hold it into the future.  Clamping won't force compliance on wide stock.  It's mostly about the curvature of the annual rings.  If the curvature is minimal - flat or quarter - the warp will be milder, if it indeed happens.  This, in conjunction to the rate of growth, is going to determine the relaxation potential.  Stuff up north grows slow, so get a look at the rings and let the resaw rest for a week or so, depending on RH, before thickness planning.  

The band operation in my town cuts a BARE inch, which means the dry thickness is ~7/8 on the absolute flatsawn stock.  Getting 3/4  is still OK, but the riftsawed stuff is sometimes a challenge.
Better to follow the leader than the pack. Less to step in.
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#7
  Re: RE: Another Resawing Question by MichaelMouse ([quote='Hank Knight'...)
(06-15-2018, 01:29 PM)MichaelMouse Wrote: "Secondary wood" suggests it won't be used in any great width, unless it's for deep drawers, where the joinery will hold it into the future.  Clamping won't force compliance on wide stock.  It's mostly about the curvature of the annual rings.  If the curvature is minimal - flat or quarter - the warp will be milder, if it indeed happens.  This, in conjunction to the rate of growth, is going to determine the relaxation potential.  Stuff up north grows slow, so get a look at the rings and let the resaw rest for a week or so, depending on RH, before thickness planning.  

The band operation in my town cuts a BARE inch, which means the dry thickness is ~7/8 on the absolute flatsawn stock.  Getting 3/4  is still OK, but the riftsawed stuff is sometimes a challenge.

Thanks, Michael. I had thought about ripping the board to narrow pieces, close to the dimensions I will need for my project, before I resaw it. From your response to my question it sounds like that might be a good idea.

Thanks, I appreciate your reply.
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#8
  Re: Another Resawing Question by Hank Knight (I have some 2" thick...)
I would definitely rip it first.  That makes things so much easier.  And any error is going to affect less wood (or thickness, depending on the issue).
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