All the talk of Gents Saws . .. My Steampunk "Wonder Boy"
#6
  
The recent thread on Wenzloff etc., pointed out that Gents Saws are still viable.  In fact after some years of trial and error, I prefer a Gents saw for dovetails.

My main one is a Pennsylvania 185 which is just like a Disston 68.   But I'd decided to make a slightly more aggressive saw, something individual.  Here is the proof of concept and it works just great for me.   I may re-issue it in quality materials one day.  This one was made of a parted-out cut-down 0.020" backsaw plate, a cheapo mitre-saw back, a compression-nut for the ferrule, a roll-pin/spring-pin, and a blank of ash planed to an octagonal section.

BTW I am starting to use octagonal shanks on a lot of stuff now.  They're well known on chisels and hammers, but I don't think I'd seen one on a Gents saw before (?).

   

   

Chris
Chris
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#7
  Re: All the talk of Gents Saws . .. My Steampunk "Wonder Boy" by C. in Indy (The recent thread on...)
(08-12-2018, 10:23 AM)C. in Indy Wrote: The recent thread on Wenzloff etc., pointed out that Gents Saws are still viable.  In fact after some years of trial and error, I prefer a Gents saw for dovetails.

My main one is a Pennsylvania 185 which is just like a Disston 68.   But I'd decided to make a slightly more aggressive saw, something individual.  Here is the proof of concept and it works just great for me.   I may re-issue it in quality materials one day.  This one was made of a parted-out cut-down 0.020" backsaw plate, a cheapo mitre-saw back, a compression-nut for the ferrule, a roll-pin/spring-pin, and a blank of ash planed to an octagonal section.

BTW I am starting to use octagonal shanks on a lot of stuff now.  They're well known on chisels and hammers, but I don't think I'd seen one on a Gents saw before (?).





Chris  
Your saw is interesting.  The faceted handle could be of benefit to aligning the saw to the cut line.

If you do another one I suggest that you align the sides of the octagon in the handle with those of the brass pipe fitting; and use a brass back to add a bit more weight over the saw plate and for enhanced esthetics.
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#8
  Re: All the talk of Gents Saws . .. My Steampunk "Wonder Boy" by C. in Indy (The recent thread on...)
Interesting.... I have used the 'straight' handle in balsa/hobby work, see many others use the 'gent's' design. But, I find the handle angle awkward and less assured.

Seeing tools re-purposed and modified is always fun. Do some compression nuts have lock screws, or did you add them?
Bruce
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#9
  Re: All the talk of Gents Saws . .. My Steampunk "Wonder Boy" by C. in Indy (The recent thread on...)
Chris,

A wonderful great saw, and a few of my Disston dovetails include a few Pennsylvania saws.

The interesting thing about the Pennsylvania saws is that the backs were not brass plated. Since the Disstons were brass plated, more often than not the brass has worn off over the years, they must have used the thinnest plating on earth...which makes sense, Henry Disston was one of the cheapest people on earth also, it is how he built his company up into the largest conglomerate in the U.S., in it's day.. Literally, he was the Bill Gates of his time...and rightfully so, because you could darn near build your own home if you had a full size hand saw. Lumber was now being produced in America, kits from Sears were being sold for Craftsmen style homes, really fascinating time in how the 2nd phase of the Industrial Revolution took presence.

I kind of look at Pennsylvania Saws as being similar to how the Jackson line of saws was positioned. Often the Disston models would have the nicer features, in this case the brass plated screws and folded back.

Those are great saws, I actually like the older handles, the ones that have ribs around the diameter on the bulb area...they feel pretty good to my hand.

I am going to place my interest in the Disston dovetail line as being cast in my by Walt Quadratto, he was the one that encouraged me to try the Disston 68 when I was first learning how to cut dovetails, and I bought a few of them from him...the difficult ones to find are the 70s, much rarer than the 68, but it is the plate, the TPI, the size, etc...that just make the 68 a great little saw, and a great value in it's day. This is the very reason I used a Crown gent's saw...it is essentially a copy of the 68 plate/tpi/gent-style.

Cheers,
Alan
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#10
  Re: All the talk of Gents Saws . .. My Steampunk "Wonder Boy" by C. in Indy (The recent thread on...)
Thank you, "Gents" !

Regarding 'clocking' the steampunk parts...  an 8-sided handle on a 6-sided nut always looks odd.  I did at least line-up the facets on the right side where my index guide-finger rests.   Room for revision next time Smile

That compression nut is a pretty easily machinable piece; I've seen guys turn them to round shapes on a wood lathe before.   Anyway, there's not actually a set-screw; it's just a hardened 1/8" roll-pin stuck through there and epoxied.    If I run across a gents-saw in the wild without a roll-pin, I usually add one, making sure it goes through the ferrule and the wood and the spine.

Fascinating history, Alan!


Chris
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