Glass rant!
#16
  Re: Glass rant! by K. L. McReynolds (Why cannot companies...)
Ugh, having glass cut for a project has always been an issue. When I built museum exhibits, we went through every glass company in the Washington D.C. area over the years. I remember back in 1998 when we were doing the Washington National Airport (before it was changed to Reagan National) and we had 6 stainless steel and glass kiosks to make. Each required several pieces of glass, pie shaped with a radius on the crust edge if you will and the inside as well. The glass came in any where from 1/8" to 3/8" out. The glass company pulled out a spec book and said that they were within tolerance. It was just poor craftsmanship to us.

As others have said, either take the project to the glass supplier and ask to have a piece cut to fit or take it back with the incorrect piece of glass and tell them that you will wait until they get it to fit. I have done both before.
I no longer build museums but don't want to change my name. My new job is a lot less stressful. Life is much better.

Garry
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#17
  Re: Glass rant! by K. L. McReynolds (Why cannot companies...)
I've only made a handful of projects that required cut glass.  I've used 3 different sources and had them all come out well.  Guess I'm lucky.  But I did take precautions.  In addition to providing cardboard templates for all pieces, I only dry fit the doors/frame components, where the glass was going.  I didn't cut the rabbets until I had the cut glass in hand.  That way, I still had the opportunity to modify them to accept the actual sizes I got.  I realize that isn't an option in all circumstances, but it worked our for me.  One piece was a corner cabinet, with 3 triangular shaped glass shelves, 2 mirrored sides and glass in the door.  That one had me sweating a bit.
If you are going down a river at 2 mph and your canoe loses a wheel, how much pancake mix would you need to shingle your roof?

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#18
  Re: RE: Glass rant! by museumguy (Ugh, having glass cu...)
(09-11-2018, 03:50 PM)museumguy Wrote: Ugh, having glass cut for a project has always been an issue. When I built museum exhibits, we went through every glass company in the Washington D.C. area over the years. I remember back in 1998 when we were doing the Washington National Airport (before it was changed to Reagan National) and we had 6 stainless steel and glass kiosks to make. Each required several pieces of glass, pie shaped with a radius on the crust edge if you will and the inside as well. The glass came in any where from 1/8" to 3/8" out. The glass company pulled out a spec book and said that they were within tolerance. It was just poor craftsmanship to us.

As others have said, either take the project to the glass supplier and ask to have a piece cut to fit or take it back with the incorrect piece of glass and tell them that you will wait until they get it to fit. I have done both before.

You would be better served buying from a picture framing company.  They are accustomed to this type of work, and picture frame glass is of higher quality (fewer inclusions, and cleaner).
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#19
  Re: Glass rant! by K. L. McReynolds (Why cannot companies...)
(09-12-2018, 08:13 AM)Cooler Wrote: You would be better served buying from a picture framing company.  They are accustomed to this type of work, and picture frame glass is of higher quality (fewer inclusions, and cleaner).

If I remember, it was at least 40" wide x 30" deep, 1/2" thick and tempered. For future reference, would a picture framing company be able to provide that?
I no longer build museums but don't want to change my name. My new job is a lot less stressful. Life is much better.

Garry
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#20
  Re: RE: Glass rant! by museumguy ([quote='Cooler' pid=...)
(09-16-2018, 04:08 PM)museumguy Wrote: If I remember, it was at least 40" wide x 30" deep, 1/2" thick and tempered. For future reference, would a picture framing company be able to provide that?

No.  Not at all.  Most display cases in those sizes are made with acrylic.  There is one company that sells wholesale that makes the seams invisible.  But they are very expensive.  And of course glass is more scratch resistant.

Almost 100% of all museums use acrylic, as it is safer for the art.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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