Motion sensor
#10
Lightbulb    
I have a unique situation where I need to connect two motion sensors to control one light. Any idea if this can be done and, if so, how it would be wired?
Mike

I work on the 50-50-90 rule: If there's a 50-50 choice, I'll pick the wrong one 90% of the time!
Reply
#11
  Re: Motion sensor by Scouter (I have a unique situ...)
I don't know for sure, but would assume that the typical motion sensor is set up to function much like a single light switch. You would need the equivalent of a 3-way to what you want to do. Never seen one, but they may exist. Have you tried a google search?
Reply
#12
  Re: RE: Motion sensor by Willyou (I don't know for sur...)
(10-11-2018, 11:32 PM)Willyou Wrote: I don't know for sure, but would assume that the typical motion sensor is set up to function much like a single light switch. You would need the equivalent of a 3-way to what you want to do. Never seen one, but they may exist. Have you tried a google search?

The Electrician that wired our Church was having a tough time trying to figure out how to swap out 3-way and 4-way switches on the stairwells to motion sensors. He just kept thinking that he would need 3-way motion sensor switches (which I don't believe were available at the time anyway) and he didn't think there were 4-way motion sensors available. The solution was so simple a "Mstr. Carpenter" had to tell him that we only need the lights to turn on when the switch senses motion. We don't need to turn them off because the built in timer takes care of that. So we have three ceiling lights and three single pole switches (one of each on each of three floors) The lights stay on for as long as there is movement in the stairwell. This scenario will also work for large yards where more than one light is need to light the path and/or driveway and if you also use a photocell at each, at dusk only the lights in dark areas will turn on. For interior wall switches you can use two "occupancy" motion switches in parallel (they frequently have photocells built in), or "vacancy" switches that you turn on manually and they shut off automatically.

There are 3-way motion sensor available now. They allow you to turn the light off when you don't want it to stay on or to keep it on when there's no motion detected from either location. There's some confusing circuitry in them and the directions are also confusing, but there's a version available for almost any situation and bulb type if you need any of these additional features.

Too much information? Short answer; Yes. Two (or more) single pole motion switches can easily control a single load.
Sign at N.E. Vocational School Cabinetmaking Shop 1976, "Free knowledge given daily... Bring your own container"
Reply
#13
  Re: RE: Motion sensor by Willyou (I don't know for sur...)
(10-11-2018, 11:32 PM)Willyou Wrote: I don't know for sure, but would assume that the typical motion sensor is set up to function much like a single light switch. You would need the equivalent of a 3-way to what you want to do. Never seen one, but they may exist. Have you tried a google search?

Tried, but didn't find anything, that's why I thought I would post here, to see if anyone had encountered this before, or had a wiring idea.
Mike

I work on the 50-50-90 rule: If there's a 50-50 choice, I'll pick the wrong one 90% of the time!
Reply
#14
  Re: RE: Motion sensor by MstrCarpenter ([quote='Willyou' pid...)
(10-12-2018, 12:26 AM)MstrCarpenter Wrote: The Electrician that wired our Church was having a tough time trying to figure out how to swap out 3-way and 4-way switches on the stairwells to motion sensors. He just kept thinking that he would need 3-way motion sensor switches (which I don't believe were available at the time anyway) and he didn't think there were 4-way motion sensors available. The solution was so simple a "Mstr. Carpenter" had to tell him that we only need the lights to turn on when the switch senses motion. We don't need to turn them off because the built in timer takes care of that. So we have three ceiling lights and three single pole switches (one of each on each of three floors) The lights stay on for as long as there is movement in the stairwell. This scenario will also work for large yards where more than one light is need to light the path and/or driveway and if you also use a photocell at each, at dusk only the lights in dark areas will turn on. For interior wall switches you can use two "occupancy" motion switches in parallel (they frequently have photocells built in), or "vacancy" switches that you turn on manually and they shut off automatically.

There are 3-way motion sensor available now. They allow you to turn the light off when you don't want it to stay on or to keep it on when there's no motion detected from either location. There's some confusing circuitry in them and the directions are also confusing, but there's a version available for almost any situation and bulb type if you need any of these additional features.

Too much information? Short answer; Yes. Two (or more) single pole motion switches can easily control a single load.

So, I am confused. You said two single pole motion switches can be used to control a single load, but now how. Do you have, or can you ask your electrician, for a wiring diagram, or description on how the wiring works?
Mike

I work on the 50-50-90 rule: If there's a 50-50 choice, I'll pick the wrong one 90% of the time!
Reply
#15
  Re: Motion sensor by Scouter (I have a unique situ...)
Wire the motion sensors in parallel

like this

It's not as unique as you may think. Used for long driveways, wheelchair ramps, stairwells etc.
Reply
#16
  Re: RE: Motion sensor by Snipe Hunter (Wire the motion sens...)
(10-12-2018, 08:27 AM)Snipe Hunter Wrote: Wire the motion sensors in parallel

like this

It's not as unique as you may think. Used for long driveways, wheelchair ramps, stairwells etc.

Make sure you use the same hot lead for both sensors and the same neutral.   I would also suggest a switch ahead of the motion sensors to both shut off the complete circuit and to turn off and back on quickly to keep the lights on. That switch is normally left on.   Roly
Reply
#17
  Re: RE: Motion sensor by Snipe Hunter (Wire the motion sens...)
(10-12-2018, 08:27 AM)Snipe Hunter Wrote: Wire the motion sensors in parallel

like this

It's not as unique as you may think. Used for long driveways, wheelchair ramps, stairwells etc.

Thanks.
Mike

I work on the 50-50-90 rule: If there's a 50-50 choice, I'll pick the wrong one 90% of the time!
Reply
#18
  Re: Motion sensor by Scouter (I have a unique situ...)
I just searched Amazon for "3 way vacancy sensor switch" and got several options. I installed one last week with a standard 3-way at the other location. Like I said, the instructions are confusing but the (adjustable) timer would turn them off when it didn't sense motion regardless of which switch turned them on. You could also get them to stay on if you were planning to be at the other end of the hall (away from the sensors view) for a long time.
Sign at N.E. Vocational School Cabinetmaking Shop 1976, "Free knowledge given daily... Bring your own container"
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)