Water heater question
#10
  
I have an electric WH that I turned down while on vacation. Upon returning, I turned the heat knob to the previous setting, but the water didn't get as hot as it was before. I turned it up more, but no improvement. Yesterday our powerwent out for 2-3 minutes. When I turned the hot water tap on after the power resumed, the water was hot! It was like it was reset. What would cause this and is this a harbinger of the WH failing?

Rick
Any government that robs Peter to pay Paul, can always count on the support of Paul!
MAGA!!
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#11
  Re: Water heater question by scpapa (I have an electric W...)
Maybe a stuck contactor in the T-stat? Not exactly sure why that would happen but it's all I got. Might replace the T-stats
 
"My mortgage self-identifies as a student loan."
... Kizar Sozay


Neil Summers Home Inspections
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#12
  Re: Water heater question by scpapa (I have an electric W...)
Our water heater started superheating the water with no change in settings.  A quick web search indicated it could be the sign of a failing heating element.

Bought this water heater tune up kit at HD; for about $30, IIRC.  Drained the water heater, installed both upper and lower elements and new thermostats.  Refilled.  Problem fixed.

This water heater is 14 years old and original to the house.  If I get another year out of it for that quick $30 fix, then it was money well spent.

For stuff like this, if I can avoid a $100 service call on an appliance by taking a chance on a cheap fix, I'll do it.
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#13
  Re: RE: Water heater question by WxMan (Our water heater sta...)
(11-05-2018, 08:28 PM)WxMan Wrote: Our water heater started superheating the water with no change in settings.  A quick web search indicated it could be the sign of a failing heating element.

Bought this water heater tune up kit at HD; for about $30, IIRC.  Drained the water heater, installed both upper and lower elements and new thermostats.  Refilled.  Problem fixed.

This water heater is 14 years old and original to the house.  If I get another year out of it for that quick $30 fix, then it was money well spent.

For stuff like this, if I can avoid a $100 service call on an appliance by taking a chance on a cheap fix, I'll do it.

Thanks, I'm going to look into that.

Rick
Any government that robs Peter to pay Paul, can always count on the support of Paul!
MAGA!!
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#14
  Re: Water heater question by scpapa (I have an electric W...)
If I had a water heater that was over 10 years old and needed $30 in parts to hopefully fix it, I would think about replacing it, before it dies and most likley, causes a flood.
I read typical lifespan is 8 to 12 years. Sometimes it's better to quit while you're ahead.
I long for the days when Coke was a soft drink, and Black and Decker was a quality tool.
Happiness is a snipe free planer
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#15
  Re: Water heater question by scpapa (I have an electric W...)
I should have added that I could do it myself and labor is not a concern.
I long for the days when Coke was a soft drink, and Black and Decker was a quality tool.
Happiness is a snipe free planer
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#16
  Re: RE: Water heater question by Pirate (If I had a water hea...)
(11-06-2018, 09:24 AM)Pirate Wrote: I read typical lifespan is 8 to 12 years. Sometimes it's better to quit while you're ahead.

It really depends on the water quality and if it's being drained (bottom few inches) periodically. They can last twice that long. You should see rust stains at the bottom and seepage long before any major issues. I do understand replacing them before they go bad but I'd base replacement time on how long the last one lasted.
 
"My mortgage self-identifies as a student loan."
... Kizar Sozay


Neil Summers Home Inspections
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#17
  Re: Water heater question by scpapa (I have an electric W...)
(11-06-2018, 09:24 AM)Pirate Wrote: If I had a water heater that was over 10 years old and needed $30 in parts to hopefully fix it, I would think about replacing it, before it dies and most likley, causes a flood.
I read typical lifespan is 8 to 12 years. Sometimes it's better to quit while you're ahead.

But in my case, the failure wouldn't cause any real problem since it's right next to a well-functioning drain with a properly sloped basement concrete floor.  So I'll stick with the fix that worked for now.

Sometimes life and job circumstances don't allow all the time needed to do something like a full water heater replacement.

I will replace that water heater at some point in the future.  I've never sweated a joint before, so I bought a torch and some cheapo fittings and played with that while killing some rainy day time in the shop a couple weeks ago.
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#18
  Re: Water heater question by scpapa (I have an electric W...)
A good friend is 3rd generation plumber. His advice is drain your tank at least every 2 years. Depending on brand unscrew the drain and get in there and scratch around with a wire coat hanger. Change the anode!
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