More Log Milling
#16
  Re: More Log Milling by jteneyck (As I said in the pri...)
John

When you make the cuts to get the bark off do you ever end up with anything that is 3" thick or even some 3x3 stuff?  Would love to have some if you do.  Even some white oak or red oak or cherry any other wood for that matter.

We need a lot of turning stock and I can never keep up with demand.
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#17
  Re: RE: More Log Milling by Arlin Eastman (John When you make ...)
(11-08-2018, 10:26 PM)Arlin Eastman Wrote: John

When you make the cuts to get the bark off do you ever end up with anything that is 3" thick or even some 3x3 stuff?  Would love to have some if you do.  Even some white oak or red oak or cherry any other wood for that matter.

We need a lot of turning stock and I can never keep up with demand.

Yes, sometimes.  Are you OK with green wood?  

John
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#18
  Re: More Log Milling by jteneyck (As I said in the pri...)
John, I've been following these threads and find it very interesting. We have 50 acres of mostly hardwoods and I have been considering an Alaskan mill. Forgive me if you have already mentioned it, but what chainsaw do you use -how many cc- and what length bar is on your saw. 
Thanks,
Jim
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#19
  Re: RE: More Log Milling by jradisch (John, I've been foll...)
(11 hours ago)jradisch Wrote: John, I've been following these threads and find it very interesting. We have 50 acres of mostly hardwoods and I have been considering an Alaskan mill. Forgive me if you have already mentioned it, but what chainsaw do you use -how many cc- and what length bar is on your saw. 
Thanks,
Jim

Hi Jim.  I use an 85 cc saw, a Husqvarna 385XP.  It's no longer made, but the 390XP is and is essentially the same saw at 88 cc's.  If you decide to go the chainsaw route I strongly advise you not to get anything smaller than 85 cc if you plan to cut anything larger than 14 - 16" diameter.   I used a 28" bar with my Alaskan Mill; it could slab anything up to about 20".  On the rolling mill I use a 42" bar and it can slab anything up to about 32".  Many of the slabs I showed in these threads averaged 22" or more.   

With 50 acres of hardwoods I would be thinking of setting up a fairly permanent milling site and a solar drier.  Of course, you would need a way to haul the logs to the mill if you go that route.  If that's not in the cards then the Alaskan Mill will get it done in the bush.  


John
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#20
  Re: More Log Milling by jteneyck (As I said in the pri...)
Yup, go big if you want to get into chainsaw milling. Up around the 90cc that John is using.

But at the price of those big pro grade chainsaws you are getting up closer to the price of a small band sawmill. 

Now if you happen to have a big chainsaw already, or come across one cheap, then why not. But a little $3,000 Woodland sawmill is a LOT easier to use than an Alaskan mill, and has a little 4 stroke motor that can hum away all day and not risk burning it up.

Like woodwork shops, the sky is the limit for sawmills too. But you can buy a sawmill that "works" relatively cheap if you don't need the speed and log size of the bigger machines. 

My mill has a 3ft log dia limit, which is a bit of a problem here, but I'm not complaining as I got a heck of a good deal on it, and it otherwise does what I need it to.
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