Box Making Question
#17
  Re: RE: Box Making Question by Bill Wilson (I've made dozens of ...)
(11-20-2018, 04:13 PM)Bill Wilson Wrote: I've made dozens of small chests out of 1/2" thick red oak for our Faith Chest ministry at church.  They are 10" high, 11" wide and 23" long.  You should have no problems with the QSWO, even if it finishes out at a little less than 1/2" thick.  The ones in your pics are really nice looking.  The QSWO should really look sharp.

Thanks, guys. When I get one finished and if successful, I will post Pics. Bill's small chests fascinate me. I'd love to see a Pic of one. All of the chests that I have made are much larger and were designed to be floor standing. I usually used either ash or plain sawn red oak for those.
Rip to width. Plane to thickness. Cut to length. Join.
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#18
  Re: Box Making Question by Edwin Hackleman (In the past have mad...)
Love to see your stuff Edwin. I think of you every time I crank up my wide panel sander.

Papa Jim
I had a good day. I used every tool I own!
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#19
  Re: RE: Box Making Question by Papa Jim (Love to see your stu...)
(11-21-2018, 10:20 PM)Papa Jim Wrote: Love to see your stuff Edwin. I think of you every time I crank up my wide panel sander.

Papa Jim

My flat panel sander still works also. It's seeing less time these days, but it's always a pleasure to see how nice a wide surface turns out flat and smooth whenever I use it. I doubt I will ever wear it out. Thanks, Jim.
Rip to width. Plane to thickness. Cut to length. Join.
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#20
  Re: RE: Box Making Question by Edwin Hackleman ([quote='Bill Wilson'...)
(11-21-2018, 09:10 PM)Edwin Hackleman Wrote: Thanks, guys. When I get one finished and if successful, I will post Pics. Bill's small chests fascinate me. I'd love to see a Pic of one. All of the chests that I have made are much larger and were designed to be floor standing. I usually used either ash or plain sawn red oak for those.

Unfortunately, this Luddite isn't very tech capable and I don't have any pics of the chests to post.  They are fairly simple as this was originally intended to be a group project of the Men's Ministry at church.  The logistics of getting 6 or 8 guys  consistently on track to make these proved beyond my capabilities, so I make them with the help of one other fellow.  They are given to the family of newly baptized babies for them to keep things in that have some significance in their life of faith.

They are made mostly from red oak, because that is what my helper has the most access to.  I've built a few out of walnut, cherry & sycamore.  I scroll saw a fretwork cross and a Trinity symbol appliques out of 1/8" BB ply to add a little embellishment to them.  Each one has a small, shallow sliding tray, sort of like what you used to see in old wooden toolboxes.  I've probably made 50 or 60 of them over the past several years.
If you are going down a river at 2 mph and your canoe loses a wheel, how much pancake mix would you need to shingle your roof?

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#21
  Re: RE: Box Making Question by Edwin Hackleman ([quote='Gary G™' pid...)
(11-19-2018, 10:08 AM)rwe2156 Wrote: That is cherry not QSWO.

Try to keep up will ya.
Winkgrin


(11-19-2018, 08:21 PM)Edwin Hackleman Wrote: Here are Pics of another tool box that I made during the same era using black walnut:


I really like this box, but once again, making it the same way with QSWO may be a real challenge. Does the forum think that it can be done with white oak? If not, I would elect to not waste my time trying.


Very nice walnut tool box you have there Edwin

White Oak shouldn't be a problem, though you might get some burn marks resawing it on a table saw. Sharp blade.....sharp.....
Steve

Missouri






 
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#22
  Re: Box Making Question by Edwin Hackleman (In the past have mad...)
I agree with all of the responses so far, white oak should not be a problem. QSWO should be a little easier as it should be more stable.

Please post pics as your work is worthy of sharing. It looks awesome, great job.
I no longer build museums but don't want to change my name. My new job is a lot less stressful. Life is much better.

Garry
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