Workbench Improvements
#31
  Re: Workbench Improvements by jteneyck (I built a Euro style...)
that's a really nice job.  I have a very similar bench, and this modification is on my short list.  I am suffering from indecision about where to put the stringers, but maybe I should just put them where you did. It seems like the carcass could reduce the need for stringers to some degree.
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#32
  Re: RE: Workbench Improvements by EricU (that's a really nice...)
(12-05-2018, 02:37 PM)EricU Wrote: that's a really nice job.  I have a very similar bench, and this modification is on my short list.  I am suffering from indecision about where to put the stringers, but maybe I should just put them where you did. It seems like the carcass could reduce the need for stringers to some degree.

Thanks.  I thought about doing exactly what you mentioned; just use the cabinet in place of the top stringers.  To do that you would either have to make it a perfect fit and assemble the legs and lower stretchers around it, or make it slide in as I did and shim it out to meet the legs.  You also would have to make the top frame beefier than I did so you could bolt or screw into it through the legs.  But it's certainly doable and would gain you another drawer's worth of height at the top.  Either way should work fine and I doubt you would give up anything in rigidity of the bench.  


John
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#33
  Re: RE: Workbench Improvements by jteneyck ([quote='EricU' pid='...)
OK, a little searching and now I know what a doe's foot is.  Very clever indeed.  

John
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#34
  Re: Workbench Improvements by jteneyck (I built a Euro style...)
I like the idea of a doe's foot. What I use instead is from the 2017 FWW tools and shops issue https://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/...bench-jigs  I think there is a free video somewhere if you don't have the magazine or aren't an online member.

Mine is a 2" wide piece of 3/8" maple the width of the bench screwed to a piece of plywood that is held in the face vice.  The other side of the maple is held by a bench dog or a clamp https://goo.gl/images/MWnPaQ
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#35
  Re: RE: Workbench Improvements by jteneyck (OK, a little searchi...)
As I was looking at various holdfast/hold down options, it occurred to me that you might be able to use a common F-style clamp if you turn the handle end around.  So I went and found one with a 3/4" wide bar and tried it out by grinding off the rivet that keeps the handle end from coming off.  




I drilled a 3/4" diameter hole in a scrap of 1-3/4" material to simulate my bench.  Turns out it works just fine.  It wedges in the hole just like a round shaft would; I'm sure the serrated edges help.  So as I think about commercial options I'll use this.  Maybe I'll find this works so well that I'll just stick with it.  

John
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#36
  Re: RE: Workbench Improvements by jteneyck (As I was looking at ...)
That is one good solution , John. You probably know on an MFT table, people use the Festool screw or ratcheting clamps for clamping.

Bear in the mind that you will need to drill more holes to use those types of clamps as they do not have the long reach as a holdfast or hold-down.

Simon
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#37
  Re: Workbench Improvements by jteneyck (I built a Euro style...)
They make deep reach F-clamps. 8"??
I've got some 6"
Putzing, the new hobby

Evil lurks here, but eventually gets cleansed.


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#38
  Re: RE: Workbench Improvements by Stwood_ (They make deep reach...)
Do they fit into the 3/4" holes? I have a few deep throat clamps but they are more pricey compared to the holdfasts, and the bars are wider than the regular clamps'. Mine (5" throat) are 1-3/8" wide for rigidity, about $30 each.

Simon
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#39
  Re: Workbench Improvements by jteneyck (I built a Euro style...)
I'll have to check on that bar width
Putzing, the new hobby

Evil lurks here, but eventually gets cleansed.


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#40
  Re: RE: Workbench Improvements by Handplanesandmore (That is one good sol...)
(12-06-2018, 01:21 PM)Handplanesandmore Wrote: That is one good solution , John. You probably know on an MFT table, people use the Festool screw or ratcheting clamps for clamping.

Bear in the mind that you will need to drill more holes to use those types of clamps as they do not have the long reach as a holdfast or hold-down.

Simon

Simon, I know very little about the MFT table actually.  I know they use some kind of clamp, but really have no clue how it works. Whenever I look at Festool's stuff the prices quickly make me look elsewhere. The MFT costs, what, $1000 or something like that. Seriously? As for using the F-style long term, I rather doubt I will.  It works well enough from what I've tested but, as you said, the reach is limited compared to a holdfast.  That along with its simplicity makes the holdfast, orf the Lee Valley cam action hold down that Doug showed, a better long term solution.  So I'll probably drill a few holes in my other bench first and see how the F-style clamp actually works for everyday use.  That bench has a replaceable 1/8" Masonite top on it, so I can easily plug any unwanted holes in the laminated maple underneath and have a "new" bench top again with a new piece of Masonite.  

The long reach F-style clamps that I have do indeed have a wider bar, so they aren't a good option unless you mill the bar down to 3/4" and then you'd likely have to cut some new serrations in that edge for it to grip well.  Another option that might be pretty easy to do would be to buy a piece of 3/4" all thread and cut a slot as wide as the bar in the end a few inches long, cut the clamp's bar to the same depth you cut the slot, rivet it in the slot, and then grind the sides of the bar flush with the all thread.  

John
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