Another coffee table
#21
  Re: RE: Another coffee table by Derek Cohen ([b]Finishing the bas...)
(01-07-2019, 11:57 AM)Derek Cohen Wrote: Finishing the base ..

Splayed legs leave their tops angled with the rails, and they need to be flushed ...




... to be coplanar on both sides ...







The next step was to add corner reinforcing blocks. These were glued and screwed ...




You can see they follow the angled rails (created by the splayed legs).

The under side ..




The final stage was to level the legs. Measure the height at each corner, and use wedges under each leg until the height is the same for all ...










Hot glue the wedges so they do not move ...




Once done, scribe the bottom of each leg ...




Electrician's tape is great for marking at an angle ...




Saw off the waste, and we are done ...




I checked the result with a digital angle box. All good. Sanded to 240 grit ...




The drawer and finishing is left to do.

Regards from Perth

Derek
........................
Impressive workmanship, to say the least, Derek !!!!!! It's outstanding, heirloom quality!!
I love the Corps for those intangible possessions that cannot be
issued: pride, honor, integrity, and being able to carry on the
traditions for generations of warriors past. [Cpl. Jeff Sornij, USMC;
in Navy Times, November 1994]


Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





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#22
  Re: RE: Another coffee table by Timberwolf ([quote='Derek Cohen'...)
Derek,

Looking great! And difficult. Hats off to you.
Best,
Aram, defying laws of geometry

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: http://awacs.smugmug.com/Woodworking
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#23
  Re: Another coffee table by Derek Cohen (I began this build a...)
It is now beginning to look like something familiar ....




The legs appear pretty strong and solid. No flex.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#24
  Re: Another coffee table by Derek Cohen (I began this build a...)
Last time the base was completed, and we had a quick look at the parts together. It is not fully sanded yet, and no finish obviously. It feels very solid in the legs - I know there were some that were concerned about the 10 degree splay ....




The - almost - last lap is here, the building of the drawer. I do not want to bore the pants off all with yet another dovetailing, so rather here are some pictures of the decisions and tasks that need to take place for a well-fitted drawer.

The first decision was to choose the wood for the drawer front, and the panel at the other side (the drawer will open on one side of the coffee table, and the other side will be a fixed panel similar to the drawer front).

There is just enough of the Fiddleback Jarrah for these panels. The orientation of the figure needs to be chosen, otherwise it will look like a dog's breakfast ...







It is beautiful wood, but very interlocked. The double iron works its wonders ..




The length is short enough to joint on a shooting board ..




Mark the width ..




... and shoot to the line.

The ends are squared ...




I frequently read how important it is to have a backing board when shooting end grain to prevent spelching. This is not important at all. The best strategy is to score the line you will plane to, and then add a chamfer at the end. Use the shooting plane for this ...




Now plane until the chamfer disappears ...




No spelching ...




The fitted drawer front ...




... is tight to the sides and has about 1mm gap at the top.

The back board of the drawer, and the rear panel ...




These are the drawer parts: the front is 19mm thick, the quarter sawn Tasmanian Oak sides are 10mm (slightly thicker than my usual 8mm as it needs to be a little beefier) and the rear is 12mm ...




A peek at the drawer ...




All the details in the last chapter next time.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#25
  Re: Another coffee table by Derek Cohen (I began this build a...)
Quote:I frequently read how important it is to have a backing board when shooting end grain to prevent spelching. This is not important at all. The best strategy is to score the line you will plane to, and then add a chamfer at the end. Use the shooting plane for this ...
I learned this trick years ago from Rob Cosman, and it was a game changer for me in how I use a shooting board. It is just so much more simple a process than constantly tweaking a flush-mount backer board.
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#26
  Re: RE: Another coffee table by Derek Cohen (Last time the base w...)
Derek

I've followed your build-alongs for years, and it never gets old.
The table's a beauty, and your photo essay sets the standard for such things.
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#27
  Re: Another coffee table by Derek Cohen (I began this build a...)
This was the model for the coffee table my nephew chose when I offered to build them a wedding present ...




Let's see how we did ....

Before the coffee table was assembled from the parts, I was mindful that it would be shipped from Perth to Sydney (which is the further than New York to LA). The main concern was that the container might bounce (be dropped or be handled roughly), and the weight of the heavy Jarrah top coming down on the splayed legs might cause them severe damage. (I am not concerned about the strength of the legs for normal home use - the construction is strong. More shortly).

So, I build a table out of MDF that could be placed under the coffee table, and would take all the weight ...







The top and base were connected with steel angle brackets ...




Part of the strength in the splayed legs comes from the corner brackets, which act to lock in the mortice-and-tenon joinery by preventing movement. These steel angle brackets further lock in the base from any possible twisting.

The brackets are angled to 10 degrees to match the inside of the rails ...




Incidentally, the best, and cheapest, anvil is this section of steel angle, the insides of which are lines with Hard Maple scrap, and then clamped in the leg vise over a leg ....




The finish for the wood - Fiddleback Jarrah for the top of the carcase and the drawer fronts, and Jarrah for the base of the carcase and base/legs - was chosen for durability. It needs to be capable of resisting water marks and heat, and still have a natural appearance - not a sit-on-top finish, such as a poly or varnish. Most oil finishes are not durable enough.

What I went with in the end was Evolution (satin), a hard wax oil by Whittle. This is a floor finish, and in the examples I saw it looked more like a waxed oil finish. The reports and reviews were highly favourable. I must say, after using it, I was completely sold. It is fantastic! The surfaces were sanded to 400 grit (Abranet), and then two coats were rubbed on with a micromesh cloth, 8 hours apart. Any residue was removed immediately. There was no grain raising that I could detect, however I did rub down the first coats with 400 grit grey mesh.

The drawer case was waxed (only) with Lincoln Furniture Wax. This is a shellac-based wax. The inside of the drawer was finished with Ubeaut Hard Shellac diluted 50% with methylated spirits (alcohol). All of the above are Australian products. The interior of the drawer was lined in leather, which was waxed with Renaissance Wax.




This is a close up of the Evolution. It is so much nicer in the flesh. Silky ...




OK, to the coffee table ...

The front, with the drawer (and the agonised-over-drawer-handle-pull-whatever) ..







The colour, figure, and those rounded dovetails look fantastic ...




Other end ...




The rear has a closed panel. At the start of the project I had planned to make the drawer run all the way through, and open from each side. On reflection, this created more problems than it was worth, and so the one side was closed in with the same panel used as a drawer front ...


Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#28
  Re: Another coffee table by Derek Cohen (I began this build a...)
The Jarrah base and splayed, tapered legs ...




Finally the drawer ...

The drawer stop used was the same design as used in the Apothecary Chest. This is adjustable, which enable the position of the drawer front to be fine tuned ...




The 10mm drawer sides are Tasmanian Oak, which I find great for this purpose as it all comes quarter sawn. It is a moderately hard wood (by Oz standards). Plywood was used for the drawer bottom, as it was inset in grooves and covered in leather. Jarrah cove moulding was made to finish.







Inside there is an inscribed brass plate for remembrance ...




Thanks for all the contributions and discussion along the way.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#29
  Re: Another coffee table by Derek Cohen (I began this build a...)
I already commented on this elsewhere, but this project is special enough to repeat my praise-outstanding work Derek!
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#30
  Re: RE: Another coffee table by Derek Cohen (The Jarrah base and ...)
Stunning work, Derek. Brilliant craftsmanship.
Best,
Aram, defying laws of geometry

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: http://awacs.smugmug.com/Woodworking
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