Retirement house rehab
#11
  
Closed on our retirement bungalow on the 27th.   Cool    

Original house was probably 600sf give or take, with a 400sf addition that's now the kitchen, dining and laundry.  County records say built in 1906, so I believe it's too early to be a kit, but the floorplan is very similar to a Sears Rodessa model, with the structure more like the Sears Fairy (simple gable roof).

What I saw when I looked at it (with people still in it) was exactly what I wanted... a structurally solid old house that had been largely untouched, with new(er) windows and kitchen and bath that had been redone 'tastefully'.  As in no modern-day HGTV inspired 'design elements'.   Now that the people and furniture are gone and everything's uncovered, I'll be doing a bit more work than originally planned.    Uhoh Sarcasm 

The 100 YO pine floor is a quite a bit rougher than I thought, and a small hallway created in the remodel/addition was done with cheap laminate.  I expect it would be nigh impossible to match 100 YO pine, so I'm not even gonna try.  We'll replace with 3/4 oak, and I'll have 400-500sf of long length, straight grain pine to repurpose.  Yes  Also saved a couple of the original door jambs for the material. 

I'll replace all the interior doors with 3 panel Craftsman/Mission doors, and trim them and the windows with Craftsman era casing.  Will build that and the baseboard with poplar and paint it, because I think that helps 'lighten' up small spaces, and LOML hates oak (QSWO in particular) and that's the only thing I'd use otherwise. 

Also build the kitchen and bath cabinets in the Craftsman style, but out of cherry because Jean likes cherry and it's not worth fighting about. 

She's also taken this opportunity to mention there's no reason to move a mish-mash of furniture up there... so a Craftsman dining room, occasional tables, and one bedroom because we'll have to go back down to a queen.  

KC's gonna be busy the next couple years.   Yes
Reply
#12
  Re: Retirement house rehab by KC ([color=#333333][size...)
1906...............any idea what type of wood the floor joists are? I would imagine there is nothing between the joists and pine flooring.
Steve





!





Reply
#13
  Re: Retirement house rehab by KC ([color=#333333][size...)
Deserves a big congrats...actually sounds like fun!
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
Reply
#14
  Re: Retirement house rehab by KC ([color=#333333][size...)
Let me give you a slight heads up about 100 y/o "straight-grained" pine/fir flooring. My house was built in ca 1906. It is one of the cure cottages that housed tuberculosis patients taking the cure. Upstairs were two very small bedrooms with no closets that were oddly shaped affairs. These were the overnight nurses bedrooms. Anyway... I took out the wall between the two for a combined larger bedroom. This necessitated removing and re-using the fir wood flooring so I wouldn't have a patch in the middle where the wall was removed. I chose to reuse in order to keep unity of flooring upstairs, and where the heck are you going to get 100 yr old fir! Some of those boards stayed straight, many/most went home to mama; meaning those boards took on left and right hand turns of about 4-6 inches over a 6 ft lenth. I had to use wedges along the length to force the flooring back into alignment as I renailed the floor boards in place. Once that monumental task was done, the overall floor required re-leveling due to the 100 years of foot traffic being uneven. The floor was sanded in six directions and came out beautifully. The aroma of fir was magnificent. The bedroom spans the width of the house (25ft) and has a gambrel roof slope on each end. I didn't have enough flooring for the entire job, so I stopped the flooring where I installed a full width closet aligned where the sloped side met the flat ceiling. I bought cedar lining planks and used that for the closet floor, figuring it will never get foot traffic so who cares. It looks great, smells nice, and probably keeps moths away also. There were a couple other little challenges with that room also, but these aren't associated with assuming wood flooring will remain straight after removal. (e.g., cleaning 100yrs of dirt from tongue and grooves; don't assume walls are co-planar between adjoining rooms!). Good luck with your next projects, it is a lot of fun, learning, swearing, then enjoying the result.
Train to be miserable...
that way when the real misery starts you won't notice.
Reply
#15
  Re: Retirement house rehab by KC ([color=#333333][size...)
I relaid 650 sq ft of 1920 pine floor. Cleaned the grooves, used wedges, etc. It was totally worth the effort and not a single squeak in 18 years. Salvaged pine can be found.
Carolyn

Trip Blog for Twelve Countries:   [url=http://www.woodworkingtraveler.wordpress.com[/url]

"It's good to know, but it's better to understand."  Auze Jackson
Reply
#16
  Re: RE: Retirement house rehab by Stwood_ (1906...............a...)
(01-06-2019, 01:00 PM)Stwood_ Wrote: 1906...............any idea what type of wood the floor joists are? I would imagine there is nothing between the joists and pine flooring.

+1

Very strong possibility the flooring is plank... And possibly a structural element. So, if installing hardwood, there will either need to be a sub floor installed or installed over the existing plank flooring.

Love old houses but I've inspected so many of them now, I enjoy looking at them but rather someone else live in them.
 
"My mortgage self-identifies as a student loan."
... Kizar Sozay


Neil Summers Home Inspections
Reply
#17
  Re: RE: Retirement house rehab by Snipe Hunter ([quote='Stwood_' pid...)
(01-06-2019, 05:22 PM)Snipe Hunter Wrote: +1

Very strong possibility the flooring is plank... And possibly a structural element. So, if installing hardwood, there will either need to be a sub floor installed or installed over the existing plank flooring.

Love old houses but I've inspected so many of them now, I enjoy looking at them but rather someone else live in them.

Exactly. Our pine floor is part of the structure, nailed directly to the oak joists. Circa 1931.
Steve





!





Reply
#18
  Re: RE: Retirement house rehab by Stwood_ ([quote='Snipe Hunter...)
(01-06-2019, 06:19 PM)Stwood_ Wrote: Exactly. Our pine floor is part of the structure, nailed directly to the oak joists. Circa 1931.

Looks like 1 x 8s running perpendicular to the joists, with the pine on top of that parallel to the joists.  Son in law has several rentals in town and says all the ones he's seen have been the same way.  No squeaks that I noticed.  Someone who didn't know what they were doing with a sander left some awfully large divots in several places, which is exactly what I would do if I tried to sand them.  So out they come.
Reply
#19
  Re: RE: Retirement house rehab by KC ([quote='Stwood_' pid...)
(01-06-2019, 08:05 PM)KC Wrote: Looks like 1 x 8s running perpendicular to the joists, with the pine on top of that parallel to the joists.  Son in law has several rentals in town and says all the ones he's seen have been the same way.  No squeaks that I noticed.  Someone who didn't know what they were doing with a sander left some awfully large divots in several places, which is exactly what I would do if I tried to sand them.  So out they come.

Be sure to save the wood, at least.  It makes awesome furniture.
Carolyn

Trip Blog for Twelve Countries:   [url=http://www.woodworkingtraveler.wordpress.com[/url]

"It's good to know, but it's better to understand."  Auze Jackson
Reply
#20
  Re: RE: Retirement house rehab by MsNomer ([quote='KC' pid='770...)
(01-06-2019, 08:42 PM)MsNomer Wrote: Be sure to save the wood, at least.  It makes awesome furniture.

If it's relatively clear southern yellow pine, It can bring some awesome $$ too.
 
"My mortgage self-identifies as a student loan."
... Kizar Sozay


Neil Summers Home Inspections
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)