Question on flip-top shop carts
#11
  
Probably going to build one of these sometime in the first quarter of this year... but I have a question/concern about the durability of the 'usual' design(s) I see floating about on YT, etc.


Typically I see a 3/4" pipe or bar sandwiched in the middle of a plywood/torsion box top. The pipe ends simply go through holes in the sides of the cabinet.
My concern is the long-term durability of that setup, with quite a bit of weight (95 lb DW735 planer plus I'm guessing 40-ish lbs for the Ridgid osc. spindle/belt sander, plus whatever the platform top and pipe/bar weights, so probably north of 150 lbs) resting in just a simple hole in ordinary plywood.

I'm not worried so much about 'wearing out' the hole - small hobby shop I don't get to use it even every week, much less every day - but I am concerned about the longevity of that hole with the wood under compression with that much weight on a fairly small area.

I'd briefly entertained the idea of some sort of metal pillow blocks, but then I started wondering if I'm making this a way bigger deal than it really is?

Anyone out there used one of these flip-top carts long term? 5 yrs? 10? More? Any noticeable problems in this regard?
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#12
  Re: Question on flip-top shop carts by nuk ([color=#222222][size...)
I am looking at building one of these for a 1hp 8" grinder with CBN wheels, a Wolverine system, and (possibly) a RoboRest. Not sure what to put on the other side. A Sorby belt sharpener is a candidate, but it might be too tall. My tailed miter saw and DW735 already have their own bases.  Most of the other tools would not stay assembled if flipped upside down.

I will be following this thread with interest.
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#13
  Re: Question on flip-top shop carts by nuk ([color=#222222][size...)
If the wear concerns you, find some tubing that will slide over your pipe(?) and fit that piece of tubing into the wood.
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#14
  Re: RE: Question on flip-top shop carts by Stwood_ (If the wear concerns...)
(01-09-2019, 07:53 PM)Stwood_ Wrote: If the wear concerns you, find some tubing that will slide over your pipe(?) and fit that piece of tubing into the wood.

Read my post again... it's not the wear in the hole that I'm concerned about, as much as the compression of the fibers with most of the weight bearing down on a fairly narrow strip.  

All putting tubing over it would do is make it a very slightly wider narrow strip.
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#15
  Re: RE: Question on flip-top shop carts by nuk ([quote='Stwood_' pid...)
(01-09-2019, 08:30 PM)nuk Wrote: Read my post again... it's not the wear in the hole that I'm concerned about, as much as the compression of the fibers with most of the weight bearing down on a fairly narrow strip.  

All putting tubing over it would do is make it a very slightly wider narrow strip.

You ever look at what holds up the dowels in closets?  I don't think you have much to worry about
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#16
Photo    Re: Question on flip-top shop carts by nuk ([color=#222222][size...)
I built one a couple of years ago, planer on one side OSS on the other.  All I did was extend the pipe about 3/4" longer out the side of the ply and the glued and screwed some hardwood blocks on the outside to add some support.  Works fine, no issues.  See the red sections on the side in the pics.

   
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#17
  Re: RE: Question on flip-top shop carts by NEILYEAG (I built one a couple...)
(01-09-2019, 11:54 PM)NEILYEAG Wrote: I built one a couple of years ago, planer on one side OSS on the other.  All I did was extend the pipe about 3/4" longer out the side of the ply and the glued and screwed some hardwood blocks on the outside to add some support.  Works fine, no issues.  See the red sections on the side in the pics.

Build it the way it is.  if you find that the hole is elongating, you can take a piece of flat bar and cut a hole in it and inset that into the side to support the bar.  You could always double the plywood thickness for the sides, I doubt that would ever compress enough to matter.  I wouldn't over think it.  Have your fix worked out in case it does happen, but don't worry about a problem before it happens.
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#18
  Re: Question on flip-top shop carts by nuk ([color=#222222][size...)
(01-09-2019, 06:12 PM)nuk Wrote: Probably going to build one of these sometime in the first quarter of this year... but I have a question/concern about the durability of the 'usual' design(s) I see floating about on YT, etc.


Typically I see a 3/4" pipe or bar sandwiched in the middle of a plywood/torsion box top. The pipe ends simply go through holes in the sides of the cabinet.
My concern is the long-term durability of that setup, with quite a bit of weight (95 lb DW735 planer plus I'm guessing 40-ish lbs for the Ridgid osc. spindle/belt sander, plus whatever the platform top and pipe/bar weights, so probably north of 150 lbs) resting in just a simple hole in ordinary plywood.

I'm not worried so much about 'wearing out' the hole - small hobby shop I don't get to use it even every week, much less every day - but I am concerned about the longevity of that hole with the wood under compression with that much weight on a fairly small area.

I'd briefly entertained the idea of some sort of metal pillow blocks, but then I started wondering if I'm making this a way bigger deal than it really is?

Anyone out there used one of these flip-top carts long term? 5 yrs? 10? More? Any noticeable problems in this regard?
....I'm making this a way bigger deal than it really is? 

 Yes. 

I have one.  Two planers on each side.
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#19
  Re: Question on flip-top shop carts by nuk ([color=#222222][size...)
When I built my flip-top I used solid 5/8 rod instead of pipe. In the sides I mounted Spyraflo BFM-625-PN flange mount bronze bearings. The bearing are probably not needed. My cart has had a DW735 on one side and a 60lb spindle on the other for 9 years. No issues so far.
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#20
  Re: Question on flip-top shop carts by nuk ([color=#222222][size...)
Mine uses 3/4" oak dowel. There are oak blocks on the outside of the box to give additional support. The one thing I would do differently is orient those blocks so the dowel bears on end-grain instead of side grain. But several years on and no issues.
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