How to join rails to legs at 45* ?
#6
  
Went out for a burger with LOML at a restaurant in Freeport, ME, saw this plant stand that we both like. 

   

Decided to make one similar to it and in my thinking about the project decided that M&T would be the ticket to join the legs and rails--sort of like this very rough sketch:

   

After doing some sketching and more head scratching it's become evident to me that I have no clue as to how to approach this joinery. It can't be as simple as the sketch. Would it need to have mortises routed in each piece then joined with loose tenons? I'm all ears guys.

Thanks,  g
I've only had one...in dog beers.

If hummus is made from Garbanzo beans, why isn't it called Garbanzus?
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#7
  Re: How to join rails to legs at 45* ? by shoottmx (Went out for a burge...)
I'm sure there are harder ways, but loose tenons would be the way I would do it.  I'd run the tenons in until they intersect and miter their ends where they meet.  

John
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#8
  Re: How to join rails to legs at 45* ? by shoottmx (Went out for a burge...)
Don't overthink. The simplest solution is to start with the legs unshaped (ie rectangular or square) and cut the mortise & tenon (floating or not) as usual. Then shape the legs as you like.

Simon
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#9
  Re: How to join rails to legs at 45* ? by shoottmx (Went out for a burge...)
So I recently wanted to do something similar, but for end tables. I ran into a similar issue but came up with what I think was an effective solution.

My legs are square. I made a jig by ripping two pieces of layered up 3/4 inch MDF at 45 degree angles and opposing them on a substrate. This cradled the leg so it was rotated. I then ran it over a dado stack to flatten the corners where my aprons connected. I made this cut so that the flat was equal in width to the thickness of my aprons. I used the same jig to cradle the legs while I cut the mortises on a mortising machine. The aprons are tenoned normally.

With hindsight, I would make the jig to totally encase the leg with an opening for a router with a bushing to ride on top and both flatten the leg where the aprons were joined and then plunge cut with a narrower bit for the mortise. I see a couple of benefits to this. The dado left grooves that had to be sanded out, this would eliminate that. Also, the mortise could be easily centered. With the way I did it, you need to flip the leg end for end to get it on there perfectly.

The picture below doesn't show this perfectly, but hopefully at least conveys the idea. The right side (where the rail meets the leg) is probably the best way to visualize what the flats looked like. The back left corner shows what it the finished joint looks like.


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#10
  Re: How to join rails to legs at 45* ? by shoottmx (Went out for a burge...)
History confirms I have the ability to overthink any project.

R.Sam.
Your approach makes a lot of sense and is one that I hadn't included in my overthinking process. Will make a jig and run a few test pieces.

Thanks guys! Your thoughts are always appreciated.

g
I've only had one...in dog beers.

If hummus is made from Garbanzo beans, why isn't it called Garbanzus?
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