hand cutting dovetails
#5
  
This is in response to another post that kind of got away from me. It covers some, well meaning at heart, responses, brought up by other people. First of all I am going to post pictures of my work bench.

   


   


If you look closely at the top picture you will see three holes that are bigger than the rest. Those of the holes in the front have acme nuts burred in the top to except the threaded rods for the moxon vise. The moxon was planned as level as I could get it after mounting it and the height of the top is at a good height so that the height of the board to be cut is at a good height for my elbow swing when sawing sawing dovetails. The top is at a height that gives the wood good support but not high enough to interfere with the cut

   


My first bench had the standard length shoulder screw. I person on a different forum stated that he didn't like the shoulder vise because it left him to far from the work piece. I paid attention and shortened the screw length 2 inches to get me closer for dove tail work and incorporated a moxon vise into the build, not as an after though or an add on even though it is an add on..  And I do use the shoulder vise for a small run of dove tail sawing. But if more are required then I mount the moxon vise. It allows me to get my hips in closer to my work and to angle my body, allowing for a more natural arm swing angle at my shoulder so I can present the saw correctly to the work piece.

You can't see it but the moxon vise has two keys cut vertical I placed in it after the top was planed that the stock fits against. One is removable depending on stock width.  This takes the guess work out of is the top of the board being level which allows me to focus more on is my saw at the correct angle and plumb for the pins or square to the work piece and at the correct angle for sawing the tails. I say this because if the top is not horizontal then it is even harder to cut straight down. I do pins first so I feel it is very important. I have a line to go by for the tails and I square the saw to the board with my eye. 

So to recap: height for me I covered, Position of the body in relation to the natural swing of the arm covered, height of elbow relationship work piece covered.  Being able to sight up the saw to square and to vertical as well as angled to the line and so on covered. Note the wooden part of the shoulder vise also levels the top of the board  so that, that plane doesn't into into the equation just like the top of the moxon.

Now I don't post much and I am sure that I am  not very well known on the forum and  I am sure I left some points out on cutting dove tails. But I hope that by what I have written one can figure out that I am not a green horn.  And believe it or not I now invite everyone to share in the conversation. Please be polite and not to hard on me 

And for the future bench builders out there I hope I have given you some ideas.  The most popular bench built is the Roubo style bench and the design is primarily for hand planning so incorporate a moxon vise into the build not as an after thought .

I will say one more thing, I cut pins first others cut others cut tails first, which I liken that argument to be like what came first the chicken or the egg.  Like Frank Klausz says,  Do it however it pleases you.  And the board in the moxon vise is there only to show proportions and not height for sawing, The center hole in the moxon will a low a 12 inch wide board.

Tom
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#6
  Re: hand cutting dovetails by tablesawtom ([color=#000000]This ...)
(01-13-2019, 07:00 PM)tablesawtom Wrote: Now I don't post much and I am sure that I am  not very well known on the forum and  I am sure I left some points out on cutting dove tails. But I hope that by what I have written one can figure out that I am not a green horn.  And believe it or not I now invite everyone to share in the conversation. Please be polite and not to hard on me 

Tom

Tom,
I always enjoy your posts and your workbench is exceptional.
Anyone would profit from owning one of your benches.
I take pride in my home made Nicholson inspired workbench but it pales in comparison to yours.
But, it gets the job done for me.
Ag
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#7
  Re: RE: hand cutting dovetails by AgGEM ([quote='tablesawtom'...)
(01-13-2019, 10:17 PM)AgGEM Wrote: Tom,
I always enjoy your posts and your workbench is exceptional.
Anyone would profit from owning one of your benches.
I take pride in my home made Nicholson inspired workbench but it pales in comparison to yours.
But, it gets the job done for me.
Ag

I built a Nicholson inspired bench for my grandson last Christmas. He was 12 then. I Know that the the Nicholson style of benches is a rock solid bench  and a lot heavier than it looks and that is from experience. I think that the  Nicholson bench looks impressive when it is just setting there. His doesn't have any vises on it. I am not a fan of a leg vise but the  Nicholson would adapt to one very easily. I would put a wagon vise on it  and put some nuts in it for a moxon vise just like I did on the bench pictured above. 

Have you added any vises or other work holding items? How big is it and it you were to build another one what would you do differently?

Tom
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#8
  Re: RE: hand cutting dovetails by tablesawtom ([quote='AgGEM' pid='...)
(01-14-2019, 03:14 PM)tablesawtom Wrote: I built a Nicholson inspired bench for my grandson last Christmas. He was 12 then. I Know that the the Nicholson style of benches is a rock solid bench  and a lot heavier than it looks and that is from experience. I think that the  Nicholson bench looks impressive when it is just setting there. His doesn't have any vises on it. I am not a fan of a leg vise but the  Nicholson would adapt to one very easily. I would put a wagon vise on it  and put some nuts in it for a moxon vise just like I did on the bench pictured above. 

Have you added any vises or other work holding items? How big is it and it you were to build another one what would you do differently?

Tom

Tom,
I am struggling to resize some pictures for you.
As soon as I can figure out what I am doing wrong, I will try to post them.
Ag


Here we go:

   

   

Shave Pony Attachment:
   


I took inspiration from Paul Sellers and from Mike Siemsen. Siemsen's video on YouTube is a stand alone demonstration of what can be done with a workbench. Linky: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yvhn-PAfEW4

The Shave Pony was inspired by Shannon Rogers (Renascence Woodworker) and from another YouTube that I can not find. Member here might have pointed me in that direction, I don't remember.

You see that the bench is designed and built for a left handed woodworker.

I have a small Moxon that I recently made, will get a pix of that for you if you like.
Bench is about 17" by 5.5 feet long. I cut 6" off it when I moved it into it's new shop.
I don't remember how high it is, but it fits me.
Douglas Fur, from Home Depot for the top and base structure.

I have 2 nice holdfasts that I got from a 'netter, that was making and selling them, can not remember who. Could dig back through old PM's to see. Daily use from these.

A couple of Varitas planning stops (wonderful), and three home made dogs from oak dowel. Also used daily.

A Varitas Wonder Dog, (ok tool) and the Varitas Hold Down (a wonderful tool). I made a notched planning stop (English Woodworker) and it works great but I never use it because it takes up too much space on the bench. Otherwise, it is a great holder. Pair of Varitas Surface clamps. Jury is still out on those.
Couple of small Woodcraft holdfasts, they are sometimes useful.

I keep 2 oak dowels on either side of the front vice, holes are just above the vice rails and spaced out to hold a board for edge work. Hold fast on the long end.
Bottom of the front face of the bench is trimmed in oak to take the force of a clamp.

Do differently? Not so many holes along the front for the tail vice. I got a little carried away. Crazy
But overall, I am most pleased with the tool (bench). It is solid and mostly I am glad that I designed and built it to fit my needs. It is not as pretty now as it was when new. But that is a good thing, don't you think?
Ag
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