Gouge bevel up?
#9
  
Friend of mine scored a used lathe and some tools that include gouges with the bevel on the concave face. I got some like that back when I made a similar purchase and just stuck them in a drawer.

So what would be a good use for such a tool? When carving or turning iI have only used gouges with the bevel in the convex face.
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#10
  Re: Gouge bevel up? by TomFromStLouis (Friend of mine score...)
In woodworking, an incannel gouge is used for coping and tight inside curves.
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#11
  Re: Gouge bevel up? by TomFromStLouis (Friend of mine score...)
(01-14-2019, 06:33 PM)TomFromStLouis Wrote: Friend of mine scored a used lathe and some tools that include gouges with the bevel on the concave face.  I got some like that back when I made a similar purchase and just stuck them in a drawer.

So what would be a good use for such a tool? When carving or turning iI have only used gouges with the bevel in the convex face.

My guess is that the gouges in question have bolsters. Turning gouges do not have bolsters.
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#12
  Re: Gouge bevel up? by TomFromStLouis (Friend of mine score...)
A turner with a very different style or, as knockknock and Tom suggest, a carving or traditional trim carpenter's gouge.  When coping quarter-round profiles in doing trim (or furniture), an incannel gouge with the same radius as the quarter-round was used to shape the piece being coped.
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#13
  Re: RE: Gouge bevel up? by Bill_Houghton (A turner with a very...)
(01-14-2019, 07:55 PM)Bill_Houghton Wrote: A turner with a very different style or, as knockknock and Tom suggest, a carving or traditional trim carpenter's gouge.  When coping quarter-round profiles in doing trim (or furniture), an incannel gouge with the same radius as the quarter-round was used to shape the piece being coped.

This.  I picked up a bunch of "needs work" bench gouges (heavier duty than carving tools) and among them were a few pairs of in- and outcannel in the same sizes.  Once you have both patterns, you find uses.  I don't do much coping of joints with them but they have proved very useful in roughing out material when making curved patterns.  And they've proved useful in working on replacement saw totes and other things with inside curves.
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#14
  Re: Gouge bevel up? by TomFromStLouis (Friend of mine score...)
Knockknock got it. It’s most typically a patternmaker’s tool. It’s a paring chisel; don’t strike it.
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#15
  Re: RE: Gouge bevel up? by Paul K. Murphy (Knockknock got it. I...)
(01-16-2019, 10:04 AM)Paul K. Murphy Wrote: Knockknock got it. It’s most typically a patternmaker’s tool. It’s a paring chisel; don’t strike it.


If it has a bolster and ferrule, it may be whacked with a mallet.  If it doesn't, don't.
Better to follow the leader than the pack. Less to step in.
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#16
  Re: Gouge bevel up? by TomFromStLouis (Friend of mine score...)
Well yeah, there’s that...
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