confession and questions on natural edge
#8
  
I bought a lathe about 10 years ago and started spindle turning for practice.  After very little practice, my first "project" was 40 spindles for a swinging baby cradle.  I averaged about a spindle per hour, with the last ones bringing my average down considerably.  It took more time to turn the spindles than it did to build the cradle.  For the next cradle I thought, "slats look nearly as good as spindles."  I decided to turn some hollow forms.  My first bowl was actually a spindle with a drill hole down the middle to form a vase.  Next was a small bowl about 4" in diameter and 4" tall.  Success!!  I had seen some of the natural edge bowls posted on Woodnet and thought I would make that my third bowl.  I had a section of Bois d'arc that was very aged and dry.  Long story short, a natural edge bowl of misshapen, extremely hard wood should not be one's third bowl project.  I repaired a rather large hole in the sheetrock in my shop.  Scared me.  Back to spindles, mainly Christmas ornaments.  I retired from work about a year ago and decided to bring my lathe faceplate out of retirement and finally worked up to another natural edge bowl.  This one was an oak tree crotch that was wet and not very large.  So far, SUCCESS.

Question 1:  My wife likes the bark edge.  Is it OK to leave the bark on the edge, and if so, do you treat it in some way?

Question 2:  I'm drying it in the microwave.  It started out at 268 grams and it currently weighs 206 grams, about a 25% loss.  The first 4 minute cycle in the microwave set on power level 2/10 saw a loss of 13 grams.  Currently, a 4 minute cycle will see a decrease of 1 1/2 grams.  The tree was bulldozed down less than a week ago so it should be close to maximum water content.  Where should I stop drying percentage wise?
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#9
  Re: confession and questions on natural edge by humanrace (I bought a lathe abo...)
(01-22-2019, 05:10 PM)humanrace Wrote:  I retired from work about a year ago and decided to bring my lathe faceplate out of retirement and finally worked up to another natural edge bowl.  This one was an oak tree crotch that was wet and not very large.  So far, SUCCESS.

Question 1:  My wife likes the bark edge.  Is it OK to leave the bark on the edge, and if so, do you treat it in some way?

Question 2:  I'm drying it in the microwave.  It started out at 268 grams and it currently weighs 206 grams, about a 25% loss.  The first 4 minute cycle in the microwave set on power level 2/10 saw a loss of 13 grams.  Currently, a 4 minute cycle will see a decrease of 1 1/2 grams.  The tree was bulldozed down less than a week ago so it should be close to maximum water content.  Where should I stop drying percentage wise?

Sure, leave the bark on, if it's still there after the turning's done.  If it's pulling away as it dries, slit the top of the bubble and CA the thing back down.  On wood felled with sap up, it's sometimes necessary to reinforce/adhere the sub-bark with some water-thin CA.   Or 3# cut shellac, if you care.  Trouble is, if you're obliged to do reinforcement, oil finishes won't suffice. 

Mostly I don't, and others don't, bother to force dry natural edges.  With the walls <3/8 thick, it'll settle into shape and be ready for a finish with a couple weeks of ambient air.  Not as if it will be circular, so let it warp and go.  

Oh yes winter is the driest season for water content.
Better to follow the leader than the pack. Less to step in.
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#10
  Re: RE: confession and questions on natural edge by MichaelMouse ([quote='humanrace' p...)
Thanks.  I'll let it finish drying on my desk.  I know it's not dry because it lost 2 grams since yesterday morning just sitting in the house.  The wall thickness is about 3/8", although it's not quite as uniform as I expected.  The bark stayed on.  I'll post a pic after it's finished with laquer.
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#11
  Re: RE: confession and questions on natural edge by humanrace (Thanks.  I'll let it...)
(01-23-2019, 11:27 AM)humanrace Wrote: Thanks.  I'll let it finish drying on my desk.  I know it's not dry because it lost 2 grams since yesterday morning just sitting in the house.  The wall thickness is about 3/8", although it's not quite as uniform as I expected.  The bark stayed on.  I'll post a pic after it's finished with laquer.


Consistent thickness is not required for proper drying, only for aesthetics.  I like to cut strange pieces, and am often obliged to leave extra thickness/weight to keep them from being tippy. 

   

Note that old stuff won't hold bark no matter what you try.  Sometimes even an unnatural edge appeals as with this chunk which was destined for the furnace. 

   

   

Lots of fun possible with rough and warp stuff.
Better to follow the leader than the pack. Less to step in.
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#12
  Re: confession and questions on natural edge by humanrace (I bought a lathe abo...)
Been told trees cut down in winter and turned with bark showing doesn’t need CA glue to keep it in place. Trees cut down in summer do! Found that some what true. When in doubt use CA glue!
Bill
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#13
  Re: RE: confession and questions on natural edge by Wildwood (Been told trees cut ...)
(01-23-2019, 05:05 PM)Wildwood Wrote: Been told trees cut down in winter and turned with bark showing doesn’t need CA glue to keep it in place.  Trees cut down in summer do!  Found that some what true.  When in doubt use CA glue!
All the bark stayed on my bowl.  The tree was bulldozed over in mid January, about 1 week before I cut and turned my blank.  MichaelMouse, pictures like yours are what got me in trouble with my first natural edge bowl.

All, thanks for the help.
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#14
  Re: RE: confession and questions on natural edge by humanrace ([quote='Wildwood' pi...)
(01-24-2019, 12:22 AM)humanrace Wrote: All the bark stayed on my bowl.  The tree was bulldozed over in mid January, about 1 week before I cut and turned my blank.  MichaelMouse, pictures like yours are what got me in trouble with my first natural edge bowl.

All, thanks for the help.

Sure, tell us you got it done but don't post a picture. Winkgrin

MichealMouse those are some awesome bowls.  I especially like the second one. Shows me how far I have to go with my work yet.
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