My kitchen remodel
  Re: RE: My kitchen remodel by Duane N ([quote='MsNomer' pid...)
(02-08-2019, 05:12 PM)Duane N Wrote: 16 years ago I roughed in an outlet for a dish washer and garbage disposal, recessed lights, dedicated outlet for the refrigerator, water for ice maker and 2 drop down lights on chains over the double sink.

Just keep in mind that counter top receptacles have to be no farther than 48" apart measured at the back of the counter (to a plumb line up to the receptacle, basically), no more than 24" from the end of a counter, and any counter top 12" wide or wider requires a receptacle.  Two 20A counter top circuits are required, though in the 60's that was also the case.  Islands and peninsulas also require at least one receptacle, with restrictions on where they can be placed.  Fridge can be on one of those circuits, and back in the 60's, it was required to be on one of them, rather than its own circuit (odd).  Pantry, breakfast room, and dining room are also required to be on one or more of those 20A circuits (also dates back a long while), but I believe now all wall receptacles in the kitchen are required to be on 20A circuits, including those not serving counter tops.

When DW's sister had her kitchen remodeled, the wiring done by the 'electrician' (dude was no sparky) had a number of flaws, including a couple of serious ones.  I pointed out that with the rearranged counter space, the now-wider bit of counter next to the relocated fridge didn't have enough receptacles.  He added a duplex.  Using 14-gauge NM cable.  Which I 'suggested' he replace with 12-gauge.  Three GFCI receptacles in a chain, with each one wired to the "load" side of the upstream one.  Over range microwave with vent blower on that same counter top circuit.  He didn't change that, and it pops the circuit all the time, at least until Sis-IL moved the toaster oven to the other counter with the added receptacle that's on the other 20A circuit.  And a few other things that didn't get changed.  Easy to do right when the kitchen is just wallboard, and much harder to fix after everything is in place.

You might know all that already, but since you're rearranging counter space, I just thought I'd toss it out there.
Tom

“This place smells like that odd combo of flop sweat, hopelessness, aaaand feet.”







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  Re: My kitchen remodel by Duane N (I bought my home in ...)
(09-09-2020, 06:37 AM)fredhargis Wrote: A job well done, you can be justifiably proud of the way it turned out! Can I ask, what cook top is that you selected?  (PS, love the dog!)
Thank you.  It's a basic Whirlpool 4 burner cook top that Lowes sells.  Nothing fancy...I'm not much of a cook.  

(09-09-2020, 06:47 AM)Snipe Hunter Wrote: Man I like that..!! Great cabinets. Your countertop is stunning.

Just a heads up... not supposed to have combustible materials over the stove top.
Thanks for the heads up.  I obviously didn't get any inspections on this kitchen remodel.  The wood over the cook top is just a strip of 3/4" X 1 1/4" wide Oak and isn't permanent.  I mitered the corners but used finish screws to hold it in place in case I have to replace the microwave down the road.  

(09-09-2020, 01:13 PM)Halfathumb Wrote: Beautiful work Duane. It looks like your inspector is happy also.

Jim
Thank you.  She consumed a lot of my time when I got her but it was worth it.  Very smart and loyal dog.

(09-10-2020, 07:07 AM)KC Wrote: You mean the cabinet?  Is that because it's gas?

Agree with all the comments... that's a big job, very nice done.   Yes
Thanks.

(09-10-2020, 07:34 AM)Snipe Hunter Wrote: The shelf under the microwave. Anything within 30" vertical of the stove top cannot be combustible. Doesn't matter if it's gas or electric. Personally, I don't care but I thought you should know. If the house is sold, the home inspector inspector will note it. So if the shelf wasn't there and the microwave was installed with the rear bracket, he'd be fine.

Vertical Clearance Above Cooking Top. (CMC 921.3.2):Household cooking appliances shall have a vertical clearance above the cooking top of not less than 30 inches to combustible material or metal cabinets. A minimum clearance of 24 inches is permitted where one of the following is installed: 1.The underside of the combustible material or metal cabinet above the cooking top is protected with not less than ¼ inch insulation millboard covered with sheet metal not less than 0.0122 of an inch think. 2.A metal venting hood of sheet metal not less than 0.0122 of an inch thick is installed above the cooking top with a clearance of not less than ¼ inch between the hood and the underside of the combustible material or metal cabinet, and the hood is as wide as the appliance and the centered over the appliance.3.A listed cooking appliance or microwave oven installed over a listed cooking appliances with the terms of the upper appliance listing and the manufacturer’s installation instructions. Microwave ovens shall comply with Section 923.
Thanks for posting what code is.

(09-10-2020, 07:37 AM)Snipe Hunter Wrote: You nailed the finishes. The tile is perfect for that kitchen. I do nice work but I usually stumble when it comes down to "what goes well with what".
My parents had their kitchen re-done about 10 years ago and they had stone 2" X 2" tile installed for their back splash.  I liked the look of the natural stone and happened to be walking around Lowes and saw the Travertine tile I ended up using because I liked the neutral color and texture of the stone.  The grout color was my toughest choice.  I made the mistake of using white grout on floor tiles once....white shows everything so I learned from my mistake.  The grout I ended up using is a beige grout.

(09-10-2020, 08:05 AM)TDKPE Wrote: Just keep in mind that counter top receptacles have to be no farther than 48" apart measured at the back of the counter (to a plumb line up to the receptacle, basically), no more than 24" from the end of a counter, and any counter top 12" wide or wider requires a receptacle.  Two 20A counter top circuits are required, though in the 60's that was also the case.  Islands and peninsulas also require at least one receptacle, with restrictions on where they can be placed.  Fridge can be on one of those circuits, and back in the 60's, it was required to be on one of them, rather than its own circuit (odd).  Pantry, breakfast room, and dining room are also required to be on one or more of those 20A circuits (also dates back a long while), but I believe now all wall receptacles in the kitchen are required to be on 20A circuits, including those not serving counter tops.

When DW's sister had her kitchen remodeled, the wiring done by the 'electrician' (dude was no sparky) had a number of flaws, including a couple of serious ones.  I pointed out that with the rearranged counter space, the now-wider bit of counter next to the relocated fridge didn't have enough receptacles.  He added a duplex.  Using 14-gauge NM cable.  Which I 'suggested' he replace with 12-gauge.  Three GFCI receptacles in a chain, with each one wired to the "load" side of the upstream one.  Over range microwave with vent blower on that same counter top circuit.  He didn't change that, and it pops the circuit all the time, at least until Sis-IL moved the toaster oven to the other counter with the added receptacle that's on the other 20A circuit.  And a few other things that didn't get changed.  Easy to do right when the kitchen is just wallboard, and much harder to fix after everything is in place.

You might know all that already, but since you're rearranging counter space, I just thought I'd toss it out there.
I didn't get any inspections on this kitchen remodel and I installed what was convenient for me.  The fridge and one outlet is on a 20a dedicated circuit, the microwave and one outlet is on a 20a dedicated circuit and the 4 other outlets and garbage disposal is on another 20a circuit.  The LED lighting and fixture lights are on their own circuit as well.  I don't plan on selling my home.  So when I die my niece and nephew or the bank (depending on when I die) has to deal with what's not up to code.

Thanks for posting what you know needs to be done...it can help someone else who may read this who plans on remodeling their kitchen.
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  Re: RE: My kitchen remodel by Duane N ([quote='fredhargis' ...)
(09-10-2020, 05:07 PM)Duane N Wrote: I don't plan on selling my home.  So when I die my niece and nephew or the bank (depending on when I die) has to deal with what's not up to code.

Most home inspectors don't care much about code... like distance between receptacles. But fire safety, child safety stuff has a good deal of liability issues so I point it out. I'll measure deck spans if something looks iffy. Most everything else is It works or it's doesn't or It's new or it's old or I can't believe this old thing still works.
Neil Summers Home Inspections

Come to think of it, we used Bq/m^3 not pCi/l.  100Bq/m^3 is 2.7pCi/l. So several hundred Bq/m^2 is a whole lot different that several hundred pCi/l.

... Woodrow W. Smith
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