Hand Sprayer for Tinit
#9
  
For a while now, I've used TransTint diluted in distilled water to get a base color in oak before applying an oil based stain.  I have been happy with the results of this so far.  I usually setup a cheap HF HVLP sprayer.  After spraying on the tint, I use a cotton cloth to event it out and wipe off excess.

I'm wondering if I could use something like this instead.  I brought one to use for popcorn ceiling spraying and the spray pattern seems like it's even enough for this as well.  Anyone else tried one?

https://www.amazon.com/Chapin-1002-48-Ou...B00002N8OB
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#10
  Re: Hand Sprayer for Tinit by lincmercguy (For a while now, I'v...)
(03-02-2019, 04:27 PM)lincmercguy Wrote: For a while now, I've used TransTint diluted in distilled water to get a base color in oak before applying an oil based stain.  I have been happy with the results of this so far.  I usually setup a cheap HF HVLP sprayer.  After spraying on the tint, I use a cotton cloth to event it out and wipe off excess.

I'm wondering if I could use something like this instead.  I brought one to use for popcorn ceiling spraying and the spray pattern seems like it's even enough for this as well.  Anyone else tried one?

https://www.amazon.com/Chapin-1002-48-Ou...B00002N8OB

The HF purple HVLP gun is perfect for spraying dyes.  Maybe your technique needs some adjustment.  If you are having to use a cloth to even it out and wipe off the excess you are spraying it too heavily.  The benefit of spraying on the dye is being able to get a uniform color w/o blotch and eliminating grain raising (if you use DNA).   You'll get better uniformity by turning the fluid flow down, overlapping your passes by 50%, and spraying no heavier than the wood can absorb.  

John
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#11
  Re: Hand Sprayer for Tinit by lincmercguy (For a while now, I'v...)
It could be. I'm usually tinting oak, which is pretty forgiving. I usually hit it with a sanding block to knock the grain back down when it'd dry.
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#12
  Re: Hand Sprayer for Tinit by lincmercguy (For a while now, I'v...)
Yes, turn your material output down. Close your valve completely, then gradually open a small amount at each pass on scrap.
Steve





 
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#13
  Re: Hand Sprayer for Tinit by lincmercguy (For a while now, I'v...)
I have one of those pump up sprayers, though mine is a different brand. I use for spraying brush killer in small spots. My observation is that (with mine) the spray is not nearly as uniform as a spray gun...there are laots drops mixed in with the mist; which doesn't matter much with brush killer Laugh . But for $10 it might be worth a shot, though I'm curious why you would want to do such a thing.
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#14
  Re: RE: Hand Sprayer for Tinit by lincmercguy (It could be. I'm usu...)
(03-02-2019, 10:57 PM)lincmercguy Wrote: It could be. I'm usually tinting oak, which is pretty forgiving. I usually hit it with a sanding block to knock the grain back down when it'd dry.

How do you avoid cutting through the dye?  It's usually better to pre-raise the grain and sand the whiskers off before dying.  

John
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#15
  Re: Hand Sprayer for Tinit by lincmercguy (For a while now, I'v...)
The dye soaks into the wood. I can also sand to lighten it up if needed. It might be specific to oak or the fact that I probably use too much.

I also stain on top of the dye after it dries and is sanded.

I also am not that skilled at finishing compared to most, but I like the results.
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#16
  Re: RE: Hand Sprayer for Tinit by lincmercguy (The dye soaks into t...)
(03-03-2019, 04:50 PM)lincmercguy Wrote: The dye soaks into the wood. I can also sand to lighten it up if needed. It might be specific to oak or the fact that I probably use too much.

I also stain on top of the dye after it dries and is sanded.

I also am not that skilled at finishing compared to most, but I like the results.

Not trying to argue, but dye only soaks in a few mils regardless of how much you apply.  Here's a photo of a WO board I applied dye to, then one coat of topcoat, then ripped so you can see the cross section.  The three set of scratches on the right were done with one swipe of different grit sandpapers, 320 on the right, 180 in the middle, and 100 on the left.  The single scratch on the left was made with an awl.   The two sets of scratches on the right might have only gone through the topcoat, but the two on the right went all the way to raw wood.  I did this testing to see when I could sand between coats.  It showed that sanding even after the first coat of topcoat is a risky undertaking.  




John
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