Question on Arm-R-Seal
#11
  
I have just completed building and finishing a hard maple table for my daughter.  I have used multiple coats of Arm-R-Seal (no stain) and it came out well.  When I rub my hand over it, I can still feel some "nubs" in the finish, however.  My options at this point are to leave it alone as it looks good, or I am tempted to wet sand lightly with 1000 grit paper.  Any comments or suggestions?  Will the wet sanding change the appearance at all or just smooth it?  As always, any comments are very appreciated.
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#12
  Re: Question on Arm-R-Seal by fptahoe (I have just complete...)
Before you try sanding it, take some kraft paper (think brown paper grocery bag), wad it up into a ball and rub it with that. Be sure to try this in an inconspicuous spot first. The varnish needs to be somewhat cured before you try anything, and if it isn't you might get some unwanted results. I think sanding with the 1000 will diminish the sheen slightly, but it might not be enough to matter.
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#13
  Re: RE: Question on Arm-R-Seal by fredhargis (Before you try sandi...)
I agree with Fred.  Let it cure for at least a week before you do anything, two would be better.  Start with the paper bag; it might be enough if the nibs are really small.  You didn't say what sheen your finish is, but if it's gloss then there's a big risk even the paper bag is going to change the look.  That may be OK, or maybe not depending upon what you want.  1000 grit paper will definitely cut the sheen to satin, maybe even flat, but you can bring it back up by progressing up to 1500 or even 2000 and then using auto polishing compound to get semi gloss or gloss, depending upon which you use.  Personally, I like satin, and 0000 steel wool with paste wax does a fantastic job of giving a satin sheen on Arm-R-Seal with a baby bottom smooth feel afterwards.  

John
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#14
  Re: RE: Question on Arm-R-Seal by jteneyck (I agree with Fred.  ...)
(03-08-2019, 04:56 PM)jteneyck Wrote: I agree with Fred.  Let it cure for at least a week before you do anything, two would be better.  Start with the paper bag; it might be enough if the nibs are really small.  You didn't say what sheen your finish is, but if it's gloss then there's a big risk even the paper bag is going to change the look.  That may be OK, or maybe not depending upon what you want.  1000 grit paper will definitely cut the sheen to satin, maybe even flat, but you can bring it back up by progressing up to 1500 or even 2000 and then using auto polishing compound to get semi gloss or gloss, depending upon which you use.  Personally, I like satin, and 0000 steel wool with paste wax does a fantastic job of giving a satin sheen on Arm-R-Seal with a baby bottom smooth feel afterwards.  

John
Thanks very much both.  I should have mentioned that I used a satin finish Arm-R-Seal.  I would also like to keep the finish as satin once I am done.  I have followed up shellac finishes using Brewax and/or Johnson's Paste Wax applied with with 0000 steel wool and have been happy with the result.  

So John to recap on the Arm-R-Seal - let it cure for at least a week, 1000, 1500, 2000 grit sanding, and then finish with a wax applied with 0000 steel wool?  Sounds like a good plan to me but please critique if you have another minute.  Really appreciate the advice.
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#15
  Re: RE: Question on Arm-R-Seal by fptahoe ([quote='jteneyck' pi...)
(03-09-2019, 10:02 AM)fptahoe Wrote: Thanks very much both.  I should have mentioned that I used a satin finish Arm-R-Seal.  I would also like to keep the finish as satin once I am done.  I have followed up shellac finishes using Brewax and/or Johnson's Paste Wax applied with with 0000 steel wool and have been happy with the result.  

So John to recap on the Arm-R-Seal - let it cure for at least a week, 1000, 1500, 2000 grit sanding, and then finish with a wax applied with 0000 steel wool?  Sounds like a good plan to me but please critique if you have another minute.  Really appreciate the advice.

If you want a satin finish then there's really no need to use sandpaper unless the nibs are really big or there are runs and drips you need to flatten.  Just use 0000 steel wool and wax or soapy water as your lube.  A good middle ground would be to start with 1000 sand paper to cut off the nibs and then go straight to 0000 steel wool.  That will assure you cut the nibs off flat.  

John
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#16
  Re: Question on Arm-R-Seal by fptahoe (I have just complete...)
I second paste wax and 0000 steel wool—after it cures. Rub it out and then a cotton rag to buff the sheen. It will be silky smooth and soft to the touch. You will notice a slight decrease in sheen, IME.


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#17
  Re: Question on Arm-R-Seal by fptahoe (I have just complete...)
In my opinion modern finishes don't need wax and the application of wax only complicates re-finishing if it becomes required. 

Woodworkers' Journal disagrees, but they have good information on rubbing out the finish:

http://www.woodworkersjournal.com/rubbin...tin-gloss/
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#18
  Re: RE: Question on Arm-R-Seal by Cooler (In my opinion modern...)
(03-11-2019, 03:44 PM)Cooler Wrote: In my opinion modern finishes don't need wax and the application of wax only complicates re-finishing if it becomes required. 

Woodworkers' Journal disagrees, but they have good information on rubbing out the finish:

http://www.woodworkersjournal.com/rubbin...tin-gloss/
You are right, you don't need wax; you can use soapy water if you like.  But wax works great with steel wool on solvent based varnishes, is less messy to work with, and leaves a beautiful, silky feel.  Refinishing requires cleaning anyway, and as long as you don't use wax with silicone in it it's no big deal to remove what little wax might still be on it when that time comes.  
John
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#19
  Re: Question on Arm-R-Seal by fptahoe (I have just complete...)
I recently posted a drafting table refinished using Arm-R-Seal satin.
I had some very tiny nibs; I “dusted” them out using wet micromesh 4000 grit.
The table is pictured in the Daily Bench Shot thread on March 1st.

https://www.forums.woodnet.net/showthrea...pid7729152
Gary

Liberty, Self-Reliance, Self-Responsibility
Say what you'll do and do what you say.
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#20
  Re: Question on Arm-R-Seal by fptahoe (I have just complete...)
Thank you all!  By the time I am able to get to it, it will have cured for 9 days.  I am going to lightly wet sand and apply wax using 0000 steel wool designed for woodworking.  Thank you, again!
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