Pot stirring time -- tracksaws (or is it track saws?).
#19
  Re: RE: Pot stirring time -- tracksaws (or is it track saws?). by jteneyck (Very nice writeup.  ...)
(03-14-2019, 03:36 PM)jteneyck Wrote: Very nice writeup.  Are you satisfied you can cut parts to final dimensions?  Maybe I missed it but I don't think you addressed that aspect.  Unless that's possible, and repeatable to at least 1/64" accuracy, I don't see much benefit over what I've been doing, which is very much like you were doing before.  

John

Yes, I am confident that I can.  However I believe it may require the use of the track clamps (came with the kit). I've just been too lazy to set up my usual rig of sawhorses with 4 long rails screwed down and then the foam on top.  With the foam resting flat on my bench, it isn't easy to use the rail clamps that slide under the rail.  On what I usually knock together for plywood sheet breakdown, I'll be able to get the clamps under.  So, didn't really deal with it in that post.  

While the rails didn't slip around on the plywood, they did have a tenancy to pivot a bit.  Right now I'm putting this down to my inexperience with the kit and using a relatively small piece of plywood for testing.  A 55" rail sort of dwarfed the about 20" wide chunk I was messing with. In retrospect, maybe getting a 3rd rail at 28" would have been a good idea.

When (if) I change the ZC strips for some thicker rubber will be the time to confirm the ability to cut to dimension.  In theory, it should work just fine. In practice?
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things. -- G. Carlin
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#20
  Re: Pot stirring time -- tracksaws (or is it track saws?). by Rob Young (I don't work much wi...)
Give me a shot of the rail strips, and the side of the rail. I'll compare to my spare EZ strips I have.
Steve


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#21
  Re: RE: Pot stirring time -- tracksaws (or is it track saws?). by Stwood_ (Give me a shot of th...)
(03-14-2019, 07:49 PM)Stwood_ Wrote: Give me a shot of the rail strips, and the side of the rail. I'll compare to my spare EZ strips I have.

I've made a note to do so. 

Also, found a source of 110" long strips that are about 2.2mm thick from Makita replacement parts source. These have the adhesive applied.  Under $20 for 110".
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things. -- G. Carlin
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#22
  Re: Pot stirring time -- tracksaws (or is it track saws?). by Rob Young (I don't work much wi...)
Creepy Google search software popped up an ad for this in another web page today :

https://www.menards.com/main/tools-hardw...860634.htm

Looks to be an on-line only at Menards. Not a bad price, and appears to come with both x-cut and ripping blades. Of course I'm assuming that both blades are not all that great. And while it appears to come with rail clamps, they don't look quite as nice as others I've seen.

Track is 4 lengths of 27-1/2".

And the molding on the handle and a few other details in the photo certainly do look like the same Sheppach saw rebadged again.
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things. -- G. Carlin
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#23
  Re: Pot stirring time -- tracksaws (or is it track saws?). by Rob Young (I don't work much wi...)
IMO, even the Festool stuff needs tape for the ultimate in cut quality. Bought back in the '04 - '05 range when I needed finish cuts from about 10 sheets a week. Wound up with a triple grind laminate blade (still on the saw.)
Thanks,  Curt
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#24
  Re: Pot stirring time -- tracksaws (or is it track saws?). by Rob Young (I don't work much wi...)
This is just my perspective after owning a Dewalt tracksaw for almost 10 years. I use it for breaking down sheet goods away from the shop and that is about it. My sheet goods are stored in the garage away from the shop so, they get cut there and moved to the shop. I do value the saw and appreciate the clean cuts and great dust collection but it isn't used all that much. IIRC I have around $300 into the Dewalt including several tracks, clamps, accessories. There where deals to be had years ago on the Dewalt 28V as well as the regular 120V saws that would get you into their system for around $250. I know more recently that the Makita has had some great sale prices.
With what my usage has been over the years, I know that these generic branded (Grizzly, Scheppach, etc. etc.) versions of the tracksaws would most likely fit my needs.
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#25
  Re: Pot stirring time -- tracksaws (or is it track saws?). by Rob Young (I don't work much wi...)
Rob

My wife gave me some 1/2 ply to cut for her cabinet and I used the Green tape to tape down the middle of the cut on both sides and very nice clean cut on both sides.  I am saying this to show it really does not matter to much the type of the blade since the one I used a few teeth were damaged and in rough shape but it still cut cleanly with the tape.

Just make sure the tape sticks well to the wood and press it down hard or use the back of the tape to press it down.
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

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#26
  Re: RE: Pot stirring time -- tracksaws (or is it track saws?). by Arlin Eastman (Rob My wife gave ...)
(03-16-2019, 04:32 PM)Arlin Eastman Wrote: Rob

My wife gave me some 1/2 ply to cut for her cabinet and I used the Green tape to tape down the middle of the cut on both sides and very nice clean cut on both sides.  I am saying this to show it really does not matter to much the type of the blade since the one I used a few teeth were damaged and in rough shape but it still cut cleanly with the tape.

Just make sure the tape sticks well to the wood and press it down hard or use the back of the tape to press it down.
I use the back of an old spoon to seat the tape. Anything slick and smooth should help.

And peeling it off at a low angle into the cut helps minimize pulling out loose fibers.
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things. -- G. Carlin
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