Kokopelli
#20
  Re: Kokopelli by Splinterz25 ([color=#1d2129][font...)
Duh. Just noticed that you have it posted on FB already. I can "share" from there if you don't mind.

Lonnie
The only tool I have is a lathe.  Everything else is an accessory.
Reply
#21
  Re: RE: Kokopelli by Grey Mountain ([quote='Grey Mountai...)
(04-06-2019, 07:21 AM)Grey Mountain Wrote: The more I think about it, the more impressed I am.  If it were mine, the only thing I would change would be using Eagle feathers.  I realize you cannot do that; however,as a Native American, I can.
Could you "text" that image to me?  That's the only way I know that I would be able to share it with some of my Native American friends, especially a Navajo artist friend.
If possible, text to
405-779-3918
Or if you are on Facebook, send it to me there.  Really appreciat it.

Is this item for sale by any chance?

GM

Duh!  Just noticed that you have it posted on FB already.  I would like to "share" the picture from there.

Lonnie
Thank you very much,
Privet massage sent Lonnie
Reply
#22
  Re: Kokopelli by Splinterz25 ([color=#1d2129][font...)
That is a brilliantly executed dream catcher! Bravo!

Michael
Every day find time to appreciate life. It is far too short and 'things' happen. RIP Willem
Reply
#23
  Re: RE: Kokopelli by MichaelS (That is a brilliantl...)
(04-08-2019, 09:41 AM)MichaelS Wrote: That is a brilliantly executed dream catcher! Bravo!

Michael

Thank you Michael.
Reply
#24
  Re: Kokopelli by Splinterz25 ([color=#1d2129][font...)
Sold this piece today to a Native American (Comanche) Grey Mountain.....Lonnie is going to replace the feathers w/ Eagle Feathers, He can legally do this because of his heritage. I'm very humbled that it sold this piece to a Native American.... thanks for looking.
Reply
#25
  Re: Kokopelli by Splinterz25 ([color=#1d2129][font...)
(04-09-2019, 11:34 AM)Splinterz25 Wrote: Sold this piece today to a Native American (Comanche) Grey Mountain.....Lonnie is going to replace the feathers w/ Eagle Feathers, He can legally do this because of his heritage. I'm very humbled that it sold this piece to a Native American.... thanks for looking.

That's great!
Reply
#26
  Re: RE: Kokopelli by FrankAtl ([quote='Splinterz25'...)
(04-10-2019, 08:11 AM)FrankAtl Wrote: That's great!

Thank you Frank I hope Lonnie really enjoys this piece; I've had a great response to this piece and will be making some others similar to this one in the future.

Bruce
Reply
#27
  Re: RE: Kokopelli by Grey Mountain ([quote='Grey Mountai...)
(04-06-2019, 07:21 AM)Grey Mountain Wrote: The more I think about it, the more impressed I am.  If it were mine, the only thing I would change would be using Eagle feathers.  I realize you cannot do that; however,as a Native American, I can.
Could you "text" that image to me?  That's the only way I know that I would be able to share it with some of my Native American friends, especially a Navajo artist friend.
If possible, text to
405-779-3918
Or if you are on Facebook, send it to me there.  Really appreciat it.

Is this item for sale by any chance?

GM

Duh!  Just noticed that you have it posted on FB already.  I would like to "share" the picture from there.

Lonnie

GM.. with the OPs permission simply right-click the picture in this post, then do save as, and you have the picture saved to your local system.  Alternatively, you can do a screen capture.
Janus was a disaster, coming or going - K. L, McReynolds 07/01/2015

My blog: http://wcwoodworking.blogspot.com/
Reply
#28
  Re: Kokopelli by Splinterz25 ([color=#1d2129][font...)
There are any stories extant about the origen and sybiology of Kokopelli.
This is one.
***
Kokopelli has been revered since at least the time of the Hohokam, Yuman, and Ancestral Pueblo peoples. The first known images of him appear on Hohokam pottery dated to sometime between 750 and 850 AD.

Kokopelli may have originally been a representation of Aztec traders, known as pochtecas, who may have traveled to this region from northern Mesoamerica. These traders brought their goods in sacks slung across their backs and this sack may have evolved into Kokopelli's familiar hump; some tribes consider Kokopelli to have been a trader. These men may also have used flutes to announce themselves as friendly as they approached a settlement. This origin is still in doubt, however, since the first known images of Kokopelli predate the major era of Mesoamerican-Ancestral Pueblo peoples trade by several hundred years, as well as the Aztec Empire and its pochtecas. There is another story from the Hopi Culture that talks about Kokopele being a hunchbacked member of the village who tricks the village beauty into having sex with him.

Many believe that Kokopelli was more than a trader, and more significantly, an important conveyor of information and trinkets from afar. As a storyteller par excellence Kokopelli had the gift of languages with a formidable repertoire of body-language storytelling skills to complement his many talents. Kokopelli's usual noisy announcement upon arrival secured both the identity, and therefore the safety, of his unique presence into a community. Often accompanied by an apprentice in his travels and trade, Kokopelli was important in linking distant and diverse communities together. In the South American Andes, the 'Ekeko' character functioned in much the same way. Upon arrival, his banging and clanging of his wares dangling all about his person signaled to all that a night of entertainment and trade of his goods and talismans was at hand.

GM
The only tool I have is a lathe.  Everything else is an accessory.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)