What am I giving up by switching these planers
#21
  Re: What am I giving up by switching these planers by stav (Hi all, I have a Bel...)
(04-04-2019, 11:32 AM)stav Wrote: Hi all, I have a Belsaw 9142 planer that works pretty good. Problem is I have a very small space to store my tools. They all go in a 9'x10' room with the washer/dryer, water heater, bikes, etc.  One day I happened on this Ridgid planer for $75.  It works pretty good as well. I don't know that I see a lot of difference in them usage wise, but then I haven't used either extensively.  Considering the space, I and thinking about selling the Belsaw and keeping the Ridgid.  If anyone has any opinion on either or the idea in general, I would be glad to hear it.  

Here they are. I do have the in and outfeed tables for the Belsaw, they are just not attached at the moment.

I have two planers.  I built that flip stand on wheels that "fix this, build that" (flip top tool stand) had plans.  The stand is great.  I have both planers ready to go.  Four knobs to undo and I can use either one.  No more lifting and setting up a temp table.  It has a small foot print.  Take a look at it.

RP
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#22
  Re: RE: What am I giving up by switching these planers by RPE1 ([quote='stav' pid='7...)
Assume the Bellsaw planer cost $1000.00 in 1982.  That's $2680.00 in today's dollars.  the Ridgid new is probably $400.00.  That's the potential quality difference between the two machines.  If your use and circumstances fit the cheaper machine better than the Bellsaw, then sell the good planer and keep the cheap one.  You'll get a lightweight planer that's easy to store and someone else will get the use of the Bellsaw.
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#23
  Re: What am I giving up by switching these planers by stav (Hi all, I have a Bel...)
I did take some time to get the in and out feed on the Belsaw yesterday and did some test runs. The quality was better than I remembered and the noise was almost bearable without hearing protection. None of that makes it easier to decide.
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#24
  Re: RE: What am I giving up by switching these planers by stav (I did take some time...)
(04-07-2019, 02:24 PM)stav Wrote: I did take some time to get the in and out feed on the Belsaw yesterday and did some test runs. The quality was better than I remembered and the noise was almost bearable without hearing protection. None of that makes it easier to decide.

I'd stay with the Belsaw. As mentioned, it will take big bites and keep going.
Bet the Belsaw, will be cutting after the Ridgid has died.
The noise of portable planers is terrible.
I switched from a portable to a stationary, and won't go back.
Not sure about the Belsaw, but my old, Delta stationary planer is snipe free.
I long for the days when Coke was a soft drink, and Black and Decker was a quality tool.
Happiness is a snipe free planer
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#25
  Re: What am I giving up by switching these planers by stav (Hi all, I have a Bel...)
Given your space constraints:

Rigid could be a good option if you aren't getting snipe with that unit and you don't aren't doing heavy milling.  The quick blade changes are a big help for getting a good finish quality, and the compact storage is another plus.

As everyone pointed out, the Belsaw (or other vintage planers) can be nice for sustained milling.  Bob has a video and article in FWW about tuning and blade changes that is good reference, but this is more tedious than swapping indexed blades.  I didn't check dust collection for your Belsaw;  I made a pickup for my parks that worked well.  The rigid comes with the hood (although using this with the shop vac adapter isn't particularly useful)

I mention the snipe as an issue since I had a later generation Rigid that gave some snipe.  It could be worked around, but this was ultimately what tipped me to switching to a heavier, vintage tool.


Matt
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#26
  Re: What am I giving up by switching these planers by stav (Hi all, I have a Bel...)
(04-04-2019, 11:32 AM)stav Wrote: Hi all, I have a Belsaw 9142 planer that works pretty good. Problem is I have a very small space to store my tools. They all go in a 9'x10' room with the washer/dryer, water heater, bikes, etc.  One day I happened on this Ridgid planer for $75.  It works pretty good as well. I don't know that I see a lot of difference in them usage wise, but then I haven't used either extensively.  Considering the space, I and thinking about selling the Belsaw and keeping the Ridgid.  If anyone has any opinion on either or the idea in general, I would be glad to hear it.  

Here they are. I do have the in and outfeed tables for the Belsaw, they are just not attached at the moment.
Why not make a small frame and set the Rigid on top of the BelSaw when not in use?  Each has something they do better than the other, being you have both, use them both.
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#27
  Re: What am I giving up by switching these planers by stav (Hi all, I have a Bel...)
Having owned both, the Belsaw is far and away a better planer AND more useful: It can be used as a molder AND rip saw.

But you're limited in space.

I was, once, too, selling the Belsaw and keeping the Rigid.

I regret that decision now.
Semper fi,
Brad

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#28
  Re: What am I giving up by switching these planers by stav (Hi all, I have a Bel...)
I haven’t made a decision here yet. I though it would be easy but when I started using the Belsaw it got complicated. The Belsaw still sits out in the carport because it doesn’t fit in the space with my other tools.
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#29
  Re: What am I giving up by switching these planers by stav (Hi all, I have a Bel...)
Have a WW igitfest and have the Igits build you a tool shed.
Gary

Liberty, Self-Reliance, Self-Responsibility
Say what you'll do and do what you say.
ServicePen 2014
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#30
  Re: What am I giving up by switching these planers by stav (Hi all, I have a Bel...)
We’re looking to convert the carport into a garage. Hopefully it will pan out.
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