Waxing table saws - Why?
#11
  
It seems that the general consensus is that table saws should be waxed, or coated in some way.

My understanding is that the two main reasons for doing so are to protect it from rusting and to make the surface more 'slick'.

What is the reasoning behind having a slick surface?  In what way/s does it improve the saw's performance?

Thanks
Ken
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#12
  Re: Waxing table saws - Why? by kenlipfromoz (It seems that the ge...)
(04-10-2019, 06:58 AM)kenlipfromoz Wrote: It seems that the general consensus is that table saws should be waxed, or coated in some way.

My understanding is that the two main reasons for doing so are to protect it from rusting and to make the surface more 'slick'.

What is the reasoning behind having a slick surface?  In what way/s does it improve the saw's performance?

Thanks
Ken

A slick surface allows you to push the wood smoothly into the blade.  If it is not slick it will move in small jerks so you have less control.   A smooth even feed will result in the best cut.  Roly
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#13
  Re: Waxing table saws - Why? by kenlipfromoz (It seems that the ge...)
However, if you do wax the saw, only use wax and not anything that has silcone in it.  Also make sure you wipe down the saw very thorougly after waxing to remove all the excess.

Residual wax will make finishing an issue.  And silicone is almost impossible to remove entirely from a surface.  So never use that or any spray that might contain that.

Pledge contains silicones; Endust does not.
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#14
  Re: Waxing table saws - Why? by kenlipfromoz (It seems that the ge...)
Not having the rust also makes it more "slick".  The result is less binding of the wood on the saw surface and less rust marking the wood as you cut.
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#15
  Re: Waxing table saws - Why? by kenlipfromoz (It seems that the ge...)
Wax your jointer table and fence and a little on the soles of hand planes makes woodworking less tiring.
Any free advice given is worth double price paid.
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#16
  Re: RE: Waxing table saws - Why? by Roly ([quote='kenlipfromoz...)
(04-10-2019, 07:25 AM)Roly Wrote: A slick surface allows you to push the wood smoothly into the blade. 

What Roly said.
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#17
  Re: RE: Waxing table saws - Why? by Cian ([quote='Roly' pid='7...)
I got the feeling that some of you feed your stock mostly by hand. Yes?

Unless I am handling a huge sheet, I use either a push shoe or block (like the Grrriper), and I have never experienced any binding of any kind on the surface. May be feeding your stock by hand is different. My crosscut sled's bottom is not waxed either, it glides smoothly since the runners (incra bars) offer a perfect fit, free of binding.

I do not wax my table whatsoever, but I do apply rust preventative like the T9, after a surface treatment with the WD40.

Perhaps the key reason I don't wax any of my machine tables is that it attracts dust, and given the humid condition my shop is, it is no no to my machines.

Simon
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#18
  Re: RE: Waxing table saws - Why? by Handplanesandmore (I got the feeling th...)
(04-10-2019, 12:20 PM)Handplanesandmore Wrote: I do not wax my table whatsoever, but I do apply rust preventative like the T9, after a surface treatment with the WD40.

I apply T9 and then then work it into the surface, but I apply paste wax later as well.
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#19
  Re: Waxing table saws - Why? by kenlipfromoz (It seems that the ge...)
Some really old geezer told me to buy dollar store wax paper, since it's cheap. Then wad it up, and rub the tables with that after cleaning them.  Works well for me.
Jim in Okie
You can tell a lot about the character of a man -
By the way he treats those who can do nothing for him.
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#20
  Re: Waxing table saws - Why? by kenlipfromoz (It seems that the ge...)
The machine you’ll notice waxing the most on is the jointer. Because you’re pushing the wood down and into the cutterhead, friction is a big deal. I hit the jointer with a block of canning wax frequently. Any residue will get planed off anyway.
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