Waxing table saws - Why?
#21
  Re: Waxing table saws - Why? by kenlipfromoz (It seems that the ge...)
After using oils, wd40, lps and other oily films and still getting the occasional rust spots in my humid part of the world, I gave into the advice here and used Johnson's floor paste wax on all my cast iron tops and haven't had an issue with rust spots yet!
 Also, the lumber/wood just shoots right through the saw. I wax the fence as well on the TS and the laminated top on the router table and it's fence.

 I might even start waxing the blade. Raised
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#22
  Re: Waxing table saws - Why? by kenlipfromoz (It seems that the ge...)
I wax more for rust prevention than anything. My aluminum top Porter Cable job site saw has never seen wax.
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#23
  Re: Waxing table saws - Why? by kenlipfromoz (It seems that the ge...)
(04-10-2019, 06:58 AM)kenlipfromoz Wrote: It seems that the general consensus is that table saws should be waxed, or coated in some way.

My understanding is that the two main reasons for doing so are to protect it from rusting and to make the surface more 'slick'.

What is the reasoning behind having a slick surface?  In what way/s does it improve the saw's performance?

Thanks
Ken

I use Johnson's paste wax and also sprinkle talcum powder on cast iron surfaces. The talcum powder makes the surface very slick, even more than wax. You only need a few sprinkles of the powder and it rarely shows up on the wood surface. I worked in a shop where the saws were very large 7-1/2 HP and we sprinkled a product called "Dance Magic" which I think is mostly talcum powder. The powder brushes off or even a short blast with compressed air. Never had a problem with contamination of wood finishes.
mike
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#24
  Re: RE: Waxing table saws - Why? by K. L. McReynolds (I wax more for rust ...)
(04-10-2019, 10:22 PM)K. L McReynolds Wrote: I wax more for rust prevention than anything. My aluminum top Porter Cable job site saw has never seen wax.


Abrasion from the wood should be enough to keep a busy saw surface polished and slick, though cast iron has greater "lubricity" than aluminum, for those who use their saw less.
Better to follow the leader than the pack. Less to step in.
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#25
  Re: RE: Waxing table saws - Why? by mike4244 ([quote='kenlipfromoz...)
(04-11-2019, 03:13 AM)mike4244 Wrote: I use Johnson's paste wax and also sprinkle talcum powder on cast iron surfaces. The talcum powder makes the surface very slick, even more than wax. You only need a few sprinkles of the powder and it rarely shows up on the wood surface. I worked in a shop where the saws were very large 7-1/2 HP and we sprinkled a product called "Dance Magic" which I think is mostly talcum powder. The powder brushes off or even a short blast with compressed air. Never had a problem with contamination of wood finishes.
mike


Talc?  Planning on becoming a plaintiff in the lawsuits against J&J?  

FWIW, lots of modern "talcum powder" ain't, as they told us.  Cornstarch, mostly.
Better to follow the leader than the pack. Less to step in.
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#26
  Re: Waxing table saws - Why? by kenlipfromoz (It seems that the ge...)
I think I've only waxed my table saw top once, maybe when I first got it.  I don't have humidity & rust problems and wood still slides easily.

I do wax my planer bed, scroll saw table and the templates for my PC dovetail jig pretty regularly.  None of those are cast iron.
If you are going down a river at 2 mph and your canoe loses a wheel, how much pancake mix would you need to shingle your roof?

http://blazinbladesscrollers.webs.com/
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#27
  Re: RE: Waxing table saws - Why? by BrokenOlMarine (Some really old geez...)
(04-10-2019, 05:03 PM)BrokenOlMarine Wrote: Some really old geezer told me to buy dollar store wax paper, since it's cheap.  Then wad it up, and rub the tables with that after cleaning them.  Works well for me.

Learned something new! Thank you!
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#28
  Re: RE: Waxing table saws - Why? by AgGEM ([quote='BrokenOlMari...)
(04-11-2019, 07:15 AM)AgGEM Wrote: Learned something new! Thank you!


You did know that the wax on cheap wax paper was good old (American definition) paraffin?  Keep some available for lubricating fasteners prior to driving.
Better to follow the leader than the pack. Less to step in.
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#29
  Re: RE: Waxing table saws - Why? by MichaelMouse ([quote='AgGEM' pid='...)
(04-11-2019, 08:14 AM)MichaelMouse Wrote: You did know that the wax on cheap wax paper was good old (American definition) paraffin?  Keep some available for lubricating fasteners prior to driving.

No, I did not.
Thank you.
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#30
  Re: RE: Waxing table saws - Why? by MichaelMouse ([quote='mike4244' pi...)
(04-11-2019, 06:37 AM)MichaelMouse Wrote: Talc?  Planning on becoming a plaintiff in the lawsuits against J&J?  

FWIW, lots of modern "talcum powder" ain't, as they told us.  Cornstarch, mostly.

 Stuff is bad for the lungs!
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