Alert if GFCI trips?
#11
  
I have not GFCI in my basement.  Further, my basement is wet.  There is a sump pump.  I put a dehumidifier down there this week. I set it on a couple of cement blocks.

I would like to put a GFCI on all the basement circuits (I think there are three). What is the best way to set up an alert system, so that if the GFCI trips, I know about it, and can react?

Thanks.
I tried not believing.  That did not work, so now I just believe
Reply
#12
  Re: Alert if GFCI trips? by Cecil (I have not GFCI in m...)
(04-14-2019, 01:41 PM)Cecil Wrote: I have not GFCI in my basement.  Further, my basement is wet.  There is a sump pump.  I put a dehumidifier down there this week. I set it on a couple of cement blocks.

I would like to put a GFCI on all the basement circuits (I think there are three).  What is the best way to set up an alert system, so that if the GFCI trips, I know about it, and can react?

Thanks.

Here is a GFCI with an alarm if this will work for you.  I am not aware of a GFCI breaker with alarm.   Roly (Don't know how loud it is)
Reply
#13
  Re: Alert if GFCI trips? by Cecil (I have not GFCI in m...)
That sort of depends on your ability to monitor it.  Many home security systems have AC power loss functions that will send you a text or phone call. A light plugged into the circuit and run to a visible location is another option. A relay tied onto the GFCI that would energize a horn or beeper powered by a battery or different circuit. A battery powered backup sump could be a power source for such.
Blackhat
Common decency is as rare as common sense. I figure there was only a finite amount of both made and its getting shared out among too many folks.


Reply
#14
  Re: Alert if GFCI trips? by Cecil (I have not GFCI in m...)
There are emergency lights that stay off if there is power; lose power and the light comes on.  Of course this has to be hooked up to the basements circuit.  You might be able to rig up a door bell or something similar.
John

Always use the right tool for the job.

We need to clean house.
Reply
#15
  Re: Alert if GFCI trips? by Cecil (I have not GFCI in m...)
Pretty sure code for an unfinished basement is all GFCI. Usually cheaper to just install a GFCI breaker in the main panel feeding the receptacles. There's also supposed to be a "service"  GFCI receptacle located at the panel. I usually see a GFCI at the panel (assuming the panel is located in the basement) and the rest of the basement receptacles are tied into it. If your basement is wired that way. Plug one of these into the circuit.

I'd probably find out why the basement is wet and fix that first.
Reply
#16
  Re: RE: Alert if GFCI trips? by Snipe Hunter (Pretty sure code for...)
(04-15-2019, 08:55 AM)Snipe Hunter Wrote: Pretty sure code for an unfinished basement is all GFCI. Usually cheaper to just install a GFCI breaker in the main panel feeding the receptacles. There's also supposed to be a "service"  GFCI receptacle located at the panel. I usually see a GFCI at the panel (assuming the panel is located in the basement) and the rest of the basement receptacles are tied into it. If your basement is wired that way. Plug one of these into the circuit.

I'd probably find out why the basement is wet and fix that first.

Yes code for basements.  A breaker is easier sure.  A single outlet on the first of the run is cheaper; but you have to find the first outlet in the stream - just easier to do the breaker.  I did that for my old house in the basement - took maybe 5 minutes.  Cost about $30 - but I know I got the whole circuit.
John

Always use the right tool for the job.

We need to clean house.
Reply
#17
  Re: RE: Alert if GFCI trips? by John Mihich ([quote='Snipe Hunter...)
(04-15-2019, 11:52 AM)John Mihich Wrote: Yes code for basements.  A breaker is easier sure.  A single outlet on the first of the run is cheaper; but you have to find the first outlet in the stream - just easier to do the breaker.  I did that for my old house in the basement - took maybe 5 minutes.  Cost about $30 - but I know I got the whole circuit.

Guess depends on where the breaker box is-- if it's in the basement, might have pretty easy access to trace the wires and find the first one in each circuit.  Seems like the outlet Roly posted would certainly do the trick!

Colin
Reply
#18
  Re: RE: Alert if GFCI trips? by Cdshakes ([quote='John Mihich'...)
(04-15-2019, 12:45 PM)Cdshakes Wrote: Guess depends on where the breaker box is-- if it's in the basement, might have pretty easy access to trace the wires and find the first one in each circuit.  Seems like the outlet Roly posted would certainly do the trick!

Colin

The key is to get the first in line.  In a basement it should be easy - depends on how old the house is.  My old house had one outlet circuit for the basement ans main floor.  I fixed that the first week I was there and couldn't run a vac and over fan at the same time. 

If you are sure you have the first in line then it's easy and easy to test.
John

Always use the right tool for the job.

We need to clean house.
Reply
#19
  Re: RE: Alert if GFCI trips? by Snipe Hunter (Pretty sure code for...)
(04-15-2019, 08:55 AM)Snipe Hunter Wrote: Pretty sure code for an unfinished basement is all GFCI. Usually cheaper to just install a GFCI breaker in the main panel feeding the receptacles. There's also supposed to be a "service"  GFCI receptacle located at the panel. I usually see a GFCI at the panel (assuming the panel is located in the basement) and the rest of the basement receptacles are tied into it. If your basement is wired that way. Plug one of these into the circuit.

I'd probably find out why the basement is wet and fix that first.

Pretty sure this is grandfathered in, but it is still smart to have GFCI in the basement.  House was built in the 1940's.  Wiring was updated to breakers at some point.  I know there are at least three circuits.  I believe the freezer and furnace are both on a circuit by themselves.

There were not any GFCI receptacles in the house when I moved in.  I added GFCI to the 3 outside receptacles.
I tried not believing.  That did not work, so now I just believe
Reply
#20
  Re: Alert if GFCI trips? by Cecil (I have not GFCI in m...)
No need for an alarm. If you have a GFI (formerly GFCI) receptacle it has already tripped at the most inopportune time.

    But the best would be the one Roly linked. I do not know of any breaker or receptacle that has an output to interface with a remote alarm etc. There are other ways to do it my motiring the load side with inductive pickups etc but nothing I know of specifically made for it short of really high end commercial stuff.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)