Bath tubs
#8
  
So this is something I have been wanting to do for 20 years.

http://www.nkwoodworking.com/wood-bathtubs

What has kept me from doing so is the finish. I’ve always assumed it would be an epoxy or fiberglass. Neither of which do I really want to mess with. In the link above, they described themselves as “boat builders” in the past and that in turn is the secret to their product. It also states that it is “non-toxic”. So, that seemingly knocks both epoxy and fiberglass out, right? What do you imagine the finish is on these?

Thanks for input
Jody
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#9
  Re: Bath tubs by jerk151 (So this is something...)
I read that all the very best cedar produced in the USA gets sent to Japan so that they can produce the bathtubs.  If you can find the right material it is doable. 

My understanding is that the layers are not glued and that the waterproofness is dependent upon the swelling of the wet wood making the joints tight.  You will have to investigate what kind of joinery is used.  The ones I've seen did not have an applied finish.

Some detail here:  http://www.bartokdesign.com/japan/0-blog...aii_-3.php
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#10
  Re: Bath tubs by jerk151 (So this is something...)
I'd look into where kayak builders source their wood. Somebody here has build strip kayaks but I don't remember who it was. Pretty sure that tub is wrapped in fiberglass cloth and set in resin... like a boat. The 2 part resin isn't toxic when set. Home Depot is full of fiberglass bathtubs. It might also be "Gelcoated"... like a boat or fiberglass bathtub.

This place is near me. Chesapeake Light Craft. They sell cedar strip.

Cedar Strip and other goodies.
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#11
  Re: Bath tubs by jerk151 (So this is something...)
(04-17-2019, 07:32 PM)jerk151 Wrote: So this is something I have been wanting to do for 20 years.

http://www.nkwoodworking.com/wood-bathtubs

What has kept me from doing so is the finish. I’ve always assumed it would be an epoxy or fiberglass. Neither of which do I really want to mess with. In the link above, they described themselves as “boat builders” in the past and that in turn is the secret to their product. It also states that it is “non-toxic”.  So, that seemingly knocks both epoxy and fiberglass out, right? What do you imagine the finish is on these?

Thanks for input
Jody

Those tubs look like they are covered with polyester or epoxy, just like "boat builders" would do.  Probably a layer of fiberglass cloth, too. 


The only way I know to prevent uncoated wooden tubs from leaking is to keep them filled with water.  

Those guys make some pretty cool stairs, too.  I think I walked past their showroom in Seattle a few years ago.  Very impressive stuff inside.  Very expensive, impressive stuff.  

John
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#12
  Re: Bath tubs by jerk151 (So this is something...)
I've read about the tubs "minimal seepage".  I presume that as the wood expands the seepage ends.

I had a 1967 Alfa Romeo convertable ("spyder").  Unlike the British cars of that era it had a cotton canvas top.  The Brits used vinyl as did USA manufacturers.


When it would rain the very tightly woven cotton would get wet inside and if you ran your finger over the interior it would come away with a drop or two of water.  But after about 5 minutes of soaking the fabric became waterproof and it never leaked.  It had the advantage of remaining waterproof until it tore (about 4 - 5 years) vs the vinyl which would crack and leak in 2 to 3 years.  They all needed replacement rear vinyl in 2 years or you could not see anything.  

I think the same is to be said about the tubs.  Carefully fitted with no finish will have some seepage, but will never develope a leak.  Whereas the sealed tubs won't seep, until they develope a leak and at that time you have a major refinishing job to do.  The Japanese baths all seem to be rectangular and I suspect that they have either a single or a double tightly fitted tongue and groove and probably no glue.  

A few drops of water on the porcelain tile is not going to be a headache.  You will drip more getting out of the tub.  I would figure out how to do the job the Japanse way--they have been building these for over a thousand years now and probably have figured out how to do it.

This video shows how they do the joints.  They compress the wood prior to assembly and let the wood expand to the original size.  Very clear demonstration here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZDesC_Bk4iA
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#13
  Re: Bath tubs by jerk151 (So this is something...)
Personally, I'd like to see how well they hold up after several years of use.  I once built a bathroom sink from quartersawn oak, it was beautiful but no matter what finish I tried, it did not hold up long.  If memory serves correctly, I even got advice on what to do from these forums.  Ultimately I sold the house, if I hadn't then I would have ended up putting a traditional sink in.
"Yes, of course duct tape works in a near-vacuum. Duct tape works anywhere. Duct tape is magic and should be worshiped." Andy Weir (in his book The Martian)
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#14
  Re: Bath tubs by jerk151 (So this is something...)
The siren song we love to hear...... But, there isn't a wood product made that survives without maintenance and heavy restoration, periodically. 

I get clear old growth western red cedar for about $8/lf (1-inch--fin. 3/4). The advantage of cedar is straight grain. The knots just cause grief. 

A diversion,

I saw one stave water tower built as recently as early 2000s. City of Seattle has above grade wooden pipe systems delivering water from the mountains/reservoirs many miles to the east of the city. About 6-foot diameter. Exteriors are dry as desert sand. I can't remember how old they are, but repairs are made by sliding steel pipe into the broken sections.
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