Stanley #2
#31
  Re: RE: Stanley #2 by stav (New related question...)
(04-30-2019, 09:28 AM)stav Wrote: New related question. How fragile is this plane with the repair that it has?  Obviously no one can really asses it without examining it. I'm looking for a more general idea of how strong this type of repair would be. Do I need to handle the plane like it is made of glass or is it ok for regular use?

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One side looks {to me} that it suffered more in the break than the other...The brazing looks more extensive..I have done cast iron brazing plenty of times in the past and where the break is tight fitting, I always prefer to silver-solder the joint together, rather than just brazing alone. SS is just as strong and has better capillary action, which actually "penetrates" the fracture AND the pores in the cast iron resulting in a better, stronger joint...

I would think the repair I see in the photo would be strong enough for general use but naturally it will never be as strong as it was before the break, so I would be a little more careful with how I handle it.
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#32
  Re: Stanley #2 by stav (I recently found a l...)
Another point is that a No. 2 is a completely useless plane. I doubt any person posting here can actually get his hand around the tote and take a shaving with it.
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#33
  Re: RE: Stanley #2 by David Katz (Another point is tha...)
(04-30-2019, 08:21 PM)David Katz Wrote: Another point is that a No. 2 is a completely useless plane. I doubt any person posting here can actually get his hand around the tote and take a shaving with it.

One theory about them is that they were meant for little kids to use during shop class way back in the day. It actually makes sense to me.
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#34
  Re: RE: Stanley #2 by mvflaim ([quote='David Katz' ...)
(04-30-2019, 09:27 PM)mvflaim Wrote: One theory about them is that they were meant for little kids to use during shop class way back in the day. It actually makes sense to me.

The plane is in demand by collectors, not by users. The plane we're discussing here has a damaged body, which makes it useless to collectors. However, selling the parts will bring in reasonable revenue. No one on planet earth uses a No. 2 to do woodworking. Throw the body away and sell the rest on eBay.
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#35
  Re: Stanley #2 by stav (I recently found a l...)
Oh, they do fit a kid's hand--no doubt about that. But an adult can use them, too. Just don't try to wrap your fingers around the tote. You hold it more like a block plane--palm on the back of the tote and fingers on the frog and body. You still get more stability than with an ordinary block plane. I've used mine occasionally for dipping into low spots on a wide surface to take out the last of the milling marks. They're also great for anything you'd use a block plane for--breaking sharp edges, little chamfers, and other trim work. However, I will admit that mine stays in the kids' tool box most of the time.

If it were me, I'd try to send the plane to somebody with a milling machine. Maybe tablesawtom would do it if you asked really nicely? Or, barring that, somebody who's flattened a few soles on a belt sander.
Steve S.
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#36
  Re: RE: Stanley #2 by Bibliophile 13 (Oh, they do fit a ki...)
(04-30-2019, 10:11 PM)Bibliophile 13 Wrote: Oh, they do fit a kid's hand--no doubt about that.  But an adult can use them, too.  Just don't try to wrap your fingers around the tote.  You hold it more like a block plane--palm on the back of the tote and fingers on the frog and body.  You still get more stability than with an ordinary block plane.  I've used mine occasionally for dipping into low spots on a wide surface to take out the last of the milling marks.  They're also great for anything you'd use a block plane for--breaking sharp edges, little chamfers, and other trim work.  However, I will admit that mine stays in the kids' tool box most of the time.

If it were me, I'd try to send the plane to somebody with a milling machine.  Maybe tablesawtom would do it if you asked really nicely?  Or, barring that, somebody who's flattened a few soles on a belt sander.

Milling the sole of that plane will not restore its value to a collector.
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#37
  Re: RE: Stanley #2 by David Katz (Another point is tha...)
(04-30-2019, 08:21 PM)David Katz Wrote: Another point is that a No. 2 is a completely useless plane. I doubt any person posting here can actually get his hand around the tote and take a shaving with it.

Not really.  It excels at working smaller items.  That's what it was designed for.  Just because you can't wrap all your fingers around the tote doesn't mean you can't hold and operate the plane with a good level of control.  Even a No. 1 can be used if you simply grasp it with one hand.  For large hands (much more common today than when the plane was invented), it's definitely a challenge to get comfortable with - especially if you try to hold and use it like your No. 4.  The only disadvantage other than size is the lack of a frog adjusting screw, so there's really no way to adjust the mouth opening.  As has been mentioned earlier, a very closely set chip breaker can work wonders planing difficult wood.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#38
  Re: RE: Stanley #2 by David Katz ([quote='mvflaim' pid...)
(04-30-2019, 10:06 PM)David Katz Wrote: The plane is in demand by collectors, not by users. The plane we're discussing here has a damaged body, which makes it useless to collectors. However, selling the parts will bring in reasonable revenue. No one on planet earth uses a No. 2 to do woodworking. Throw the body away and sell the rest on eBay.

Agree that it is sought out mainly by collectors and that a broken sole makes this plane nothing but a user, or parts trove, but I disagree it is not used.  I've used mine on a regular basis for a number of tasks, in smoothing in particular.  That being said, its not often used, but when you have a particular problem it can be the right tool for the job, sort of like the 98 and 99, and the 48 and 49.
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#39
  Re: RE: Stanley #2 by Admiral ([quote='David Katz' ...)
(05-01-2019, 08:02 AM)Admiral Wrote: Agree that it is sought out mainly by collectors and that a broken sole makes this plane nothing but a user, or parts trove, but I disagree it is not used.  I've used mine on a regular basis for a number of tasks, in smoothing in particular.  That being said, its not often used, but when you have a particular problem it can be the right tool for the job, sort of like the 98 and 99, and the 48 and 49.

Fair enough. I own a Lie-Nielsen #2 I bought in a lot of LN tools acquired from an estate sale. My hand is simply too big to hold the plane in order to use it. Trying to use it as a block or apron plane is far more hassle than it's worth, at least for me. If I need a small plane to smooth something I'll turn to a variety of other tools, including one of the half-dozen block planes I own in different sizes.  I plan on selling the plane on eBay (LN almost always goes for near retail price there) and use the dough to buy something I'll actually use.
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#40
  Re: Stanley #2 by stav (I recently found a l...)
I agree it is small and not entirely comfortable to use, but while I was testing it out it proved to be capable. It did everything my #4 did, just at a smaller scale.

I'm thinking maybe my boys can use it if it is up to the abuse they might apply to it.
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