Stanley #2
#41
  Re: RE: Stanley #2 by David Katz (Another point is tha...)
(04-30-2019, 08:21 PM)David Katz Wrote: Another point is that a No. 2 is a completely useless plane. I doubt any person posting here can actually get his hand around the tote and take a shaving with it.

I'd argue against that point.  I have a no. 2 regular rotation.  It works well.  I'm perfectly average adult male at 5'11".

It requires a different grip, but I am able use it without issue.
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#42
  Re: RE: Stanley #2 by David Katz ([quote='Admiral' pid...)
(05-01-2019, 08:53 AM)David Katz Wrote: Fair enough. I own a Lie-Nielsen #2 I bought in a lot of LN tools acquired from an estate sale. My hand is simply too big to hold the plane in order to use it. Trying to use it as a block or apron plane is far more hassle than it's worth, at least for me. If I need a small plane to smooth something I'll turn to a variety of other tools, including one of the half-dozen block planes I own in different sizes.  I plan on selling the plane on eBay (LN almost always goes for near retail price there) and use the dough to buy something I'll actually use.

I'd point out that a block plane doesn't have a chipbreaker.  Depending on the problem you're trying to solve, that might be a deal breaker.

If you're serious about selling it, keep me in mind before you post it on the 'Bay!  Big Grin
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#43
  Re: Stanley #2 by stav (I recently found a l...)
I'd look at the idea of gently clamping the base down, front and rear, to a flat surface.
Then heating the brass repair up, not enough to melt it from the steel, but enough for it to give some, bringing it into plane.
Heat one side at a time.
Steve





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#44
  Re: RE: Stanley #2 by Stwood_ (I'd look at the idea...)
(05-01-2019, 02:19 PM)Stwood_ Wrote: I'd look at the idea of gently clamping the base down, front and rear, to a flat surface.
Then heating the brass repair up, not enough to melt it from the steel, but enough for it to give some, bringing it into plane.
Heat one side at a time.

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That might work, except I think you would have to add some brazing rod to the joints while clamped to a flat surface. Not a big deal at all...
I love the Corps for those intangible possessions that cannot be
issued: pride, honor, integrity, and being able to carry on the
traditions for generations of warriors past. [Cpl. Jeff Sornij, USMC;
in Navy Times, November 1994]


Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
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#45
  Re: Stanley #2 by stav (I recently found a l...)
Possible. But you'll only move that base a few thou.....Dad.
Steve





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#46
  Re: Stanley #2 by stav (I recently found a l...)
I think think clamping it down and heating it is a good shot if you have a non metallic surface to work on. A plane brazed to a large steel plate would be unfortunate. I have a 6 that shed its tail during the sudden stop when it leapt off a shelf to the floor. I've been pondering the exact process to use on it.
Blackhat
Common decency is as rare as common sense. I figure there was only a finite amount of both made and its getting shared out among too many folks.


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#47
  Re: Stanley #2 by stav (I recently found a l...)
The brass on the OP's base is on the sides, not the bottom.
I would use a heavy, steel plate to clamp it to. It isn't going to take any pressure to pull it down flat with say a c-clamp.
Steve





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#48
  Re: Stanley #2 by stav (I recently found a l...)
The cracks in the OP 's plane go right to the mouth. A bit too hot too close to the sole and that braze could wick and flow. I agree that your approach is worth a shot and has a high chance of success but heat control will be tricky. I wouldn't want to try it on a steel plate when I have granite or marble available for a base.
Blackhat
Common decency is as rare as common sense. I figure there was only a finite amount of both made and its getting shared out among too many folks.


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#49
  Re: Stanley #2 by stav (I recently found a l...)
There isn't enough brass there.....
And the plate won't be hot....
Steve





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#50
  Re: RE: Stanley #2 by blackhat (I think think clampi...)
(05-01-2019, 03:39 PM)blackhat Wrote: I think think clamping it down and heating it is a good shot if you have a non metallic surface to work on. A plane brazed to a large steel plate would be unfortunate. I have a 6 that shed its tail during the sudden stop when it leapt off a shelf to the floor. I've been pondering the exact process to use on it.

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" A plane brazed to a large steel plate would be unfortunate."

A trick I learned many years ago to prevent lead solder, silver solder or brazing rod from flowing where I do not want it to go...use a lead pencil to coat the surface you want to keep free of solder etc...the graphite contaminates the surface and can withstand the heat, plus solder etc will not flow across it.

Here's a little musical instrument plane I made years ago using that trick..silver-soldered....


I love the Corps for those intangible possessions that cannot be
issued: pride, honor, integrity, and being able to carry on the
traditions for generations of warriors past. [Cpl. Jeff Sornij, USMC;
in Navy Times, November 1994]


Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





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