Hybrid Poplar worthless
#11
  
Last summer we cut a large hybrid poplar. I suspected the wood was of no value, but the 30-inch diameter bole was so clear and straight, we milled it into 8/4 boards. Of course it is still wet, but I just tried working with it. The table saw, the thickness planer, the jointer, and even a hand plane, none of them will leave a clean surface. Chips, nicks, splinters. Guess I’ll take the load to the burn pile. —Peter
Reply
#12
  Re: Hybrid Poplar worthless by petertay15 (Last summer we cut a...)
I've not heard of a hybrid poplar (but there's lots of tree species I've not heard of).  What features was it supposed to have over a regular poplar (yellow poplar, I'm guessing)?
Reply
#13
  Re: Hybrid Poplar worthless by petertay15 (Last summer we cut a...)
They are a giant weed....very fast growing.

Ed
Reply
#14
  Re: Hybrid Poplar worthless by petertay15 (Last summer we cut a...)
Well could you use it for distressed-finished projects?
Reply
#15
  Re: Hybrid Poplar worthless by petertay15 (Last summer we cut a...)
Grain is similar to a willow most likely. Willow doesn't work well, especially if it isn't completely dry
Steve





!





Reply
#16
  Re: Hybrid Poplar worthless by petertay15 (Last summer we cut a...)
Hybrid poplar is various trees of the "populus" genus. What the rest of the world calls "Poplar". The US versions are Cottonwood and Aspen. What is called Yellow Poplar (or just Poplar) in the US is a Magnolia, and a totally different tree. So it's going to work more like Cottonwood at best. Soft and stringy.   Usually gets used for pulp or making pallets, because it's cheap and no one cares how smooth it comes out.
Reply
#17
  Re: RE: Hybrid Poplar worthless by ianab (Hybrid poplar is var...)
(05-09-2019, 03:59 AM)ianab Wrote: Hybrid poplar is various trees of the "populus" genus. What the rest of the world calls "Poplar". The US versions are Cottonwood and Aspen. What is called Yellow Poplar (or just Poplar) in the US is a Magnolia, and a totally different tree. So it's going to work more like Cottonwood at best. Soft and stringy.   Usually gets used for pulp or making pallets, because it's cheap and no one cares how smooth it comes out.


US is also referred to as "tulip" or "tulip-poplar."  What you have is "popple,", one, or two, as it's a hybrid, species of the Populus genus.  It features interlocked grain, which suited it marvelously for the bottoms of wagons and stone boats, where you could throw anything on it for a dent, not a split.  Favored by the Finns as sauna seats, because it won't send splinters in your butt, and seems cooler to the skin than other woods in the heat.  

You can use it anywhere - insides and underneath - a smooth surface is not required, as well.  Smoothest when worked low-angle, and as above, when cured.
Better to follow the leader than the pack. Less to step in.
Reply
#18
  Re: Hybrid Poplar worthless by petertay15 (Last summer we cut a...)
OP here. We planted hybrid poplars when we moved to a fairly barren country property. They were provided free by the county. They grow ten feet a year, up to 100 feet. The sprig we stuck in the ground was the size of a pencil, two years later it really was 20 feet tall. We understood they are used for pulpwood, but they are wonderful shade trees. Wide crown with 5-inch leaves that flutter in the wind. The leaves are so thick they smother the lawn if not raked up. The wood is white with tight smooth grain. But worthless for furniture. Peter
Reply
#19
  Re: RE: Hybrid Poplar worthless by ianab (Hybrid poplar is var...)
(05-09-2019, 03:59 AM)ianab Wrote: Hybrid poplar is various trees of the "populus" genus. What the rest of the world calls "Poplar". The US versions are Cottonwood and Aspen. What is called Yellow Poplar (or just Poplar) in the US is a Magnolia, and a totally different tree. So it's going to work more like Cottonwood at best. Soft and stringy.   Usually gets used for pulp or making pallets, because it's cheap and no one cares how smooth it comes out.

Many years ago my FIL sawed down several large trees on his farm.  They were nice and straight and clear, so thinking they were poplar, he took them to the local saw mill to have them cut into boards.  The sawyer told him they were "Quaking Aspen" and worthless as lumber.  They may have been cotton wood.  I really don't know.

Anyway, he hauled them over to my place for me to cut up and use as firewood.  I thought I was getting something until I started splitting it (by hand).  It was so tough and stringy, it wouldn't break apart, even though the logs were so straight & clear.  I fought with it for some time, not wanting it to go to waste and finally managed to get it all split.  A couple years later it came time to start burning it.  I noticed that when I picked a piece up, it hardly weighed anything, compared to the maple, red oak and cherry that I typically burn.  I threw some of it in the furnace and soon discovered that it burned as fast as paper and generated little heat.  I told my FIL that I got more heat from splitting that wood than I did from burning it.  Someone called it a giant weed and that's exactly what it is.
If you are going down a river at 2 mph and your canoe loses a wheel, how much pancake mix would you need to shingle your roof?

http://blazinbladesscrollers.webs.com/
Reply
#20
  Re: Hybrid Poplar worthless by petertay15 (Last summer we cut a...)
(05-08-2019, 08:50 PM)petertay15 Wrote: Last summer we cut a large hybrid poplar. I suspected the wood was of no value, but the 30-inch diameter bole was so clear and straight, we milled it into 8/4 boards. Of course it is still wet, but I just tried working with it. The table saw, the thickness planer, the jointer, and even a hand plane, none of them will leave a clean surface. Chips, nicks, splinters. Guess I’ll take the load to the burn pile.  —Peter

Cottonwood is actually better, if that's any comfort. I cut poplar for campfire wood and kindling. I suppose you could use it to make pallets.
Rip to width. Plane to thickness. Cut to length. Join.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)