Coarser diamond stone?
#9
  
Does anyone make a diamond stone more coarse than the 140gr Atoma stone?  Something, say, as coarse as a person file but with diamonds?
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#10
  Re: Coarser diamond stone? by jgourlay (Does anyone make a d...)
(05-11-2019, 08:22 PM)jgourlay Wrote: Does anyone make a diamond stone more coarse than the 140gr Atoma stone?  Something, say, as coarse as a person file but with diamonds?

My wife's ring.
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#11
  Re: Coarser diamond stone? by jgourlay (Does anyone make a d...)
(05-11-2019, 08:22 PM)jgourlay Wrote: Does anyone make a diamond stone more coarse than the 140gr Atoma stone?  Something, say, as coarse as a person file but with diamonds?

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You might consider Boron Nitride grains on cast iron..I bought some from an Ebay dealer a couple years ago......~ 80grit IIRC.
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#12
  Re: Coarser diamond stone? by jgourlay (Does anyone make a d...)
I have a 100 grit stone - leaves deep furrows that take a while to get out.
Thanks,  Curt
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#13
  Re: Coarser diamond stone? by jgourlay (Does anyone make a d...)
XX coarse diasharp? I use that thing when I don’t have access to a grinder. I’m not familiar with the Atoma. Sorry if this is old news.
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#14
  Re: Coarser diamond stone? by jgourlay (Does anyone make a d...)
I believe it is a Diasharp but would not swear to it. It does hog off metal but just as with power, I find it easy to get in trouble - not that I have used it all that much.
Thanks,  Curt
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#15
  Re: Coarser diamond stone? by jgourlay (Does anyone make a d...)
I think they top out in coarseness with something like the XX Coarse Diasharp (DMT) which is 120 grit or so.

You didn't say what you need to use this for, but I don't really like diamond stones for really heavy stock removal.  They seem to lose aggression very quickly and then are not all that fast cutting.  I would only consider it for work on something that really requires diamonds (e.g. tungsten carbide, crazy exotic steels, etc.).  

In fact I haven't really like any coarse stones- they either cut slowly or don't stay flat well (or sometimes both).  The best I have is a Norton Crystolon (100 grit), which is a silicon-carbide oilstone but sheds grit almost like a waterstone in order to keep cutting speed high.  It's the fastest cutting stone I've used, but the stone will not maintain perfect flatness- so its good for knives and bevels of tools but not great for flattening a back.  I expect it would destroy most flattening stones, so it's not very practical to maintain perfect flatness like you would with a normal waterstone.

If you need fast cutting and flatness, the best thing I've found is 80 grit PSA sandpaper on a flat surface- granite surface plates are ideal.  When fresh the paper cuts quicker than anything else I've used.  The paper will dull noticeably after a few minutes so you need to keep changing the paper if you have a big job to do- there is a dramatic difference in cutting speed between fresh paper and paper that's been used for a couple of minutes.  

These days I don't bother with stones for anything under medium grit (i.e. the stones you'd use for routine sharpening).  The sandpaper lap is more of a hassle to set up but performs much better for coarse grits.

Loose grit on a cast iron lap seems like a good option as well, I've just never fooled with it.
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#16
  Re: Coarser diamond stone? by jgourlay (Does anyone make a d...)
I also use sandpaper instead of diamond stones for flattening if the tool needs some serious work.  Big jobs can really shorten the life of the diamonds.  One way I save money is to buy a couple of different grit belts from a store that rents out floor sanders.  They tend to sell the sandpaper separate from the sander rental and you can use spray adhesive to stick it to a flat surface.  They tend to be cheaper per square inch than a normal sheet and lasts pretty long.  Also their size allows you to flatten the sole of even jointer planes.
John
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