Wood and steel screw lubrication
#11
  
Just a heads up for those using wooden and steel screws in vises, etc. I do not know how it would fare in machines, such as a tablesaw.

I’ve been using Selley’s Ezy Glide for a while now. The link is an Australian site, but I believe it is also available in the USA. The active ingredient is PTFE (Teflon). It seems to do a good job of smoothing the passing of a screw. So far I used it on wooden screws in a leg vise and Moxon vise, and the steel screw of the end vise. It dries clear and does not get greasy or attract sawdust.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#12
  Re: Wood and steel screw lubrication by Derek Cohen ([color=#222222][size...)
Derek,

Have you tried it on your table saw for the blade  elevation and angle? I've been using paraffin, which works but doesn't last that long.

Charles
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#13
  Re: Wood and steel screw lubrication by Derek Cohen ([color=#222222][size...)
I've been doing woodworking as a "pro" for 35 years. I've always worked in a shop and we always have tried many types of lubrication on tablesaws. The current lube of choice is an aerosol PTFE Teflon type spray. For the last several years, it has worked flawlessly. After cleaning the blade tilt and the raise and lower gears, we spray a good coat on the gears. Allow it to dry and it lasts for several weeks.
I no longer build museums but don't want to change my name. My new job is a lot less stressful. Life is much better.

Garry
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#14
  Re: Wood and steel screw lubrication by Derek Cohen ([color=#222222][size...)
From the guy who knows: 

Ten years ago, mid-2000's, Teflon was the ideal frictionless lubricant for indoor free-flight. Those of us pushing the rubber-band-powered-model-aeroplane flight duration envelope used it exclusively. Some fliers were uninformed enough to attempt adding silicone lube (fluid) to the prop-thrust-bearing interface. 

Good stuff!
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#15
  Re: Wood and steel screw lubrication by Derek Cohen ([color=#222222][size...)
I've had pretty good success with Frog Lube. It's was actually designed for firearms, but I know other machinists that use it on their tooling as well.

I use it on my twin screw.

https://www.froglube.com/
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#16
  Re: Wood and steel screw lubrication by Derek Cohen ([color=#222222][size...)
I use a product called Door-Ease. Non greasy and eventually dries to a chunky state.
I don't even know if it's available anymore. I've had these 2 tubes since the early 1970's and used them to lube car door hinges.
Steve





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#17
  Re: RE: Wood and steel screw lubrication by Stwood_ (I use a product call...)
(05-19-2019, 06:01 PM)Stwood_ Wrote: I use a product called Door-Ease. Non greasy and eventually dries to a chunky state.
I don't even know if it's available anymore. I've had these 2 tubes since the early 1970's and used them to lube car door hinges.

That the key, IMO, something that is dry enough that it doesn't leave oils and other residues all over the wood. It is the very reason not to mix woodworking and metalworking on the same bench, it just doesn't work. I used to use machine oil, like Starrett, but it left stains on the wood. It annoyed me so I moved over to Frog-Lube. I actually saw a machinist on YouTube using it on his magnetic chuck, raving about the nice coating Frog Lube leaves on the metal and how it leave it dry. Since I had some, I tried it on the twin-screw. Works great. I use a heat gun to warm up the metal before I apply it.

Cheers,
Alan
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#18
  Re: Wood and steel screw lubrication by Derek Cohen ([color=#222222][size...)
The aerosols that end up being dry work best on table saws. Any liquid or grease will eventually collect dust and grime, sort of defeating the purpose of the lube. Aerosols with teflon work best for me. Greases should only be used where there is little chance of exposure to dust and grime.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#19
  Re: RE: Wood and steel screw lubrication by AHill (The aerosols that en...)
(05-20-2019, 07:26 AM)AHill Wrote: The aerosols that end up being dry work best on table saws.  Any liquid or grease will eventually collect dust and grime, sort of defeating the purpose of the lube.  Aerosols with teflon work best for me.  Greases should only be used where there is little chance of exposure to dust and grime.

.......................
For metal to metal, the best high-pressure lube we ever used was Moly Disulfide..Available in aerosols, it totally prevented galling...We also used it in a Moly grease for boom extensions which are exposed to extreme pressures..We used Shaeffer Products brand because of the high Moly content, but there are lots of moly lubes on today's market.,One brand cautioned that it was not to be used on trigger sears because it reduced the trigger pull too much. I believed them!!! I have watched the friction tests! Big eek
I love the Corps for those intangible possessions that cannot be
issued: pride, honor, integrity, and being able to carry on the
traditions for generations of warriors past. [Cpl. Jeff Sornij, USMC;
in Navy Times, November 1994]


Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





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#20
  Re: RE: Wood and steel screw lubrication by Timberwolf ([quote='AHill' pid='...)
(05-20-2019, 08:03 AM)Timberwolf Wrote: .......................
For metal to metal, the best high-pressure lube we ever used was Moly Disulfide..Available in aerosols, it totally prevented galling...We also used it in a Moly grease for boom extensions which are exposed to extreme pressures..We used Shaeffer Products brand because of the high Moly content, but there are lots of moly lubes on today's market.,One brand cautioned that it was not to be used on trigger sears because it reduced the trigger pull too much. I believed them!!! I have watched the friction tests! Big eek

Jack,

We add moly disulfide to the powder mix for parts that get machined/drilled/tapped after manufacture. For our process, a little bit goes a long way.

Another lube that works well for metal screws, etc., is Ballistol, I believe developed in Germany during WWI, for firearms (is food safe).
Waiting to grow up beyond being just a member
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