Old Delta tenon jig for tablesaw
#20
I have the "newer" one from Delta, bought it 20 years ago, works fine. Funny, but on saturday I picked up the same one from a hardware store closeout, NOS in the box. I'd offer it for sale here in S&S but the shipping would be outrageous unless you were relatively close to NJ; west of the Mississippi would cost a fortune.
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#21
I've had one of these for years.   A friend restored an extra one and gave it to me.  This weekend, one that I saw became available and I purchased it.  These are so cool.
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#22
It's funny, I've had the newer version for20+ years (Thanks Norm!)
Laugh. I used it a few days ago for the first time in years. The thing does leave smooth tenon cheeks.
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#23
I have one that I purchased from a nice person here. Mine (don't know the number offhand) also has a miter gauge. I also have the newer Delta, and one from Sears. I've thought about selling at least one, but there are times that one doesn't work and a different one will. This old one looks so nice on my four legged unisaw also!
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#24
Bob, Do you have two of those Infinity 1/4" square cut blades? Put them both on the Uni with some spacers to exactly match the chisel cut on your mortiser and make both cheek cuts at once. Although it's quicker, the big plus is that slightly different stock thicknesses won't result in different tenon thicknesses and the mortise and tenon don't have to be centered. Adjust the tenon jig to match the side against the mortiser fence. (I usually do good faces against the fences.) 
Sign at N.E. Vocational School Cabinetmaking Shop 1976, "Free knowledge given daily... Bring your own container"
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#25
(05-23-2022, 11:18 PM)MstrCarpenter Wrote: Bob, Do you have two of those Infinity 1/4" square cut blades? Put them both on the Uni with some spacers to exactly match the chisel cut on your mortiser and make both cheek cuts at once. Although it's quicker, the big plus is that slightly different stock thicknesses won't result in different tenon thicknesses and the mortise and tenon don't have to be centered. Adjust the tenon jig to match the side against the mortiser fence. (I usually do good faces against the fences.) 

Using two of those is a good idea.  I've only got one.  I have a single end tenoner so tenons aren't a big problem but two of those blades and a spacer sounds like a good idea for the 1172 tenon jig.  About the only big drawback to the tenon jig is when I've got to put tenons on the end of a long piece of stock.  The ceiling gets in the way.  I remember once I had to take my saw outside because the stock was so long.  Only did that once.

A few months back I got a call from a friend that was having trouble with his jig not cutting parallel to the miter gauge.   I checked mine with a dial indicator and found out that mine weren't quite as good as I would like.  I fooled around with things and discovered that the 1/8" x 3/4" steel bar that rides in the slot was really off.  One sample was a lot worse than the other.  I examined the bar.  The holes were punched and the ends were sheared.  All this mechanical processing distorted the bar enough to make the jig off a little.  As an experiment, I made another bar out of some stock I had.  I sawed the length and drilled the holes.  Wow, what a difference.  I made another bar a little longer and offset the holes so there was more bar sticking down in the slot.  Way better although a little tight, but tight is good when precision is needed.  Below are the results.  It did make a difference in precision.  On one of my gauges I had to slip a .003 ***** behind one screw to get the jig really square.  Its a cheap fix.  Not all bars are bad I don't suppose.  One of my bars were way worse than the other.

   

   

   
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#26
(05-24-2022, 10:17 AM)Bob Vaughan Wrote: Using two of those is a good idea.  I've only got one.  I have a single end tenoner so tenons aren't a big problem but two of those blades and a spacer sounds like a good idea for the 1172 tenon jig.  About the only big drawback to the tenon jig is when I've got to put tenons on the end of a long piece of stock.  The ceiling gets in the way.  I remember once I had to take my saw outside because the stock was so long.  Only did that once.

Bob, I keep the spacers in separate envelopes with the extra mortiser chisels and bits. It really makes M&T joint set-up easy and fast.

For tenons on long pieces, how about cutting a trap door over the T.S.? Or maybe tipping the T.S. back.... no that would be too awkward. Too bad we can't crank the tilt all the way to vertical. However; I can put two blades and the spacers on my.....wait for it.... Radial Arm Saw!

Hey. It's a better idea than the guy that used his with the arbor set vertically at the front of the table and used it as a panel saw.
Big Grin

B.T.W. I still chuckle when I recall your lathe pencil sharpener.
Laugh
Laugh
Sign at N.E. Vocational School Cabinetmaking Shop 1976, "Free knowledge given daily... Bring your own container"
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#27
(05-27-2019, 10:04 PM)Smashedfinger Wrote: I just got one of those old (very heavy) Delta tenon jigs for $45.00. I'm going to clean it up and put her to use. Anyone else have one? They look like this (not mine)

https://i.postimg.cc/gjbncxYC/9610-A.jpg

Picture link not working for me. Others?

Doug
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#28
(05-25-2022, 04:10 PM)Tapper Wrote: Picture link not working for me. Others?

Doug

3 years old link is dead
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