Delta dust collector - how to test
#11
  
Continuing with the saga of the dust collection system I've been working on for my son's shop ... He bought a used Delta 2 hp machine (model 50-761), but in sizing the system, it proved to be marginal, so we're building the system with a bigger 3 hp Oneida cyclone, and selling the Delta on craigslist.  

My latest question is how to show a potential buyer that the Delta works. It's in my garage, where I only have 120V power, but it's a 240V machine. The machine is in great shape, and looks like it has hardly been used, but of course a buyer will want to see it run.  Any thoughts?
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#12
  Re: Delta dust collector - how to test by tedrussell (Continuing with the ...)
That's a 240V plug (NEMA 6-15P), if it looks like this one it's 15 amps. It will also plug into a 240/20A outlet (NEMA 6-20R). With a DC about all you can do is show it runs, though it's prudent to block the inlet and clamp the thing down so it doesn't spin aorund (or whatever).
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#13
  Re: RE: Delta dust collector - how to test by fredhargis (That's a 240V plug (...)
(06-29-2019, 06:01 PM)fredhargis Wrote: That's a 240V plug (NEMA 6-15P), if it looks like this one it's 15 amps. It will also plug into a 240/20A outlet (NEMA 6-20R). With a DC about all you can do is show it runs, though it's prudent to block the inlet and clamp the thing down so it doesn't spin aorund (or whatever).

That's the plug.  The only 240 in my house is for the stove and the dryer, but the plugs are different.
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#14
  Re: Delta dust collector - how to test by tedrussell (Continuing with the ...)
You could make a power cord that plugs in to the dryer or range outlet and has the needed female plug for the dust Collector. If you can get to the outlets in the house. 

The other option would be to add a 220 breaker if you have a breaker box in the garage. Neither option is ideal

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#15
  Re: RE: Delta dust collector - how to test by fredhargis (That's a 240V plug (...)
(06-29-2019, 06:01 PM)fredhargis Wrote: That's a 240V plug (NEMA 6-15P), if it looks like this one it's 15 amps. It will also plug into a 240/20A outlet (NEMA 6-20R). With a DC about all you can do is show it runs, though it's prudent to block the inlet and clamp the thing down so it doesn't spin aorund (or whatever).
I did a bit of research to educate myself on the different types of 240V plugs.  I didn't realize there are so many different configurations - a different plug for 15, 20, 30, and 50 amps, and for 2-pole vs 3-pole wiring.  So if I wanted to bring the DC up to my kitchen to show a potential buyer that it works, is there an adapter to go from the 50A stove outlet to a 15A outlet that I can plug the DC into?
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#16
  Re: Delta dust collector - how to test by tedrussell (Continuing with the ...)
Just be up front about it.
"Look I got this tool for sale. It's in good shape, worked great in last shop. Don't have 220v here to test it."

I've sold several tools this way before I had 220v in my shop.

Eventually someone will want it more than they need the money in their pocket... Especially on a relatively low cost item like the DC.
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#17
  Re: RE: Delta dust collector - how to test by goaliedad (You could make a pow...)
(06-29-2019, 07:38 PM)goaliedad Wrote: You could make a power cord that plugs in to the dryer or range outlet and has the needed female plug for the dust Collector. If you can get to the outlets in the house. 

The other option would be to add a 220 breaker if you have a breaker box in the garage. Neither option is ideal

Thanks.  I didn't see your answer until after I replied to Fred.  The cord idea is just what I was thinking of doing.  Adding a breaker isn't an option.
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#18
  Re: RE: Delta dust collector - how to test by Strokes77 (Just be up front abo...)
(06-29-2019, 07:46 PM)Strokes77 Wrote: Just be up front about it.
"Look I got this tool for sale. It's in good shape, worked great in last shop. Don't have 220v here to test it."

I've sold several tools this way before I had 220v in my shop.

Eventually someone will want it more than they need the money in their pocket... Especially on a relatively low cost item like the DC.

That's probably the best plan - thanks.
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#19
  Re: RE: Delta dust collector - how to test by tedrussell ([quote='fredhargis' ...)
(06-29-2019, 07:46 PM)tedrussell Wrote: I did a bit of research to educate myself on the different types of 240V plugs.  I didn't realize there are so many different configurations - a different plug for 15, 20, 30, and 50 amps, and for 2-pole vs 3-pole wiring.  So if I wanted to bring the DC up to my kitchen to show a potential buyer that it works, is there an adapter to go from the 50A stove outlet to a 15A outlet that I can plug the DC into?

There is a commercial adapter, or you can roll your own.  https://www.amazon.com/NEMA-6-20R-14-50P...168&sr=8-9. That adapter only works on post-1996 4-wire circuits, which by the way are the same as 50A RV power ports (120/240V, 50A, grounded).

To roll your own, you need a NEMA 14-50 at the stove https://www.amazon.com/Camco-PowerGrip-R...B000PGVZ30 (or 14-30 at the dryer) if it’s a post 1996 compliant installation with 4-wire circuit, or a NEMA 10-50 or 10-30 if it’s the old 3-wire circuit style.  https://www.amazon.com/TNP-Nema-10-50-Pl...ay&sr=8-10

From there you have to add a NEMA 6-15 or 6-20 receptacle to the cord.  By the time you buy and build, you’re most of the way to a commercial adapter.

You can also ‘borrow’ a 2-pole breaker in your panel and wire a short cord with a 6-20 receptacle on the end, but you’d have to go into the panel to do that, and it doesn’t sound like that’s something you’re comfortable with (don’t go poking in there if you don’t know what you’re doing).

Or do as others have suggested, and let a buyer take it on faith that it works, which is free.
Tom

“This place smells like that odd combo of flop sweat, hopelessness, aaaand feet.”







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#20
  Re: Delta dust collector - how to test by tedrussell (Continuing with the ...)
I see three options: Sell as it with the representation that it works. Tell them if it does not run, they can return it. Or offer to deliver it and test it at their shop, then tender the cash.
Credo Elvem ipsum etiam vivere
Non impediti ratione cogitationis
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