Dust collection help
#16
  Re: Dust collection help by Michael Dow (I was able to do a m...)
One other thing I forgot to mention. Before the last move I used the cheap plastic blast gates. BIG mistake. They built up a little bit of dust in corners and would not close all the way, leading to a lot of suction loss. I would recommend the more expensive metal gates or make your own. I made my own and they areself clearing. Many youtube videos on different ways. Metal boughten are an advantage if you might want to someday wire up an automatic opening system.
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#17
  Re: Dust collection help by Michael Dow (I was able to do a m...)
(07-10-2019, 04:34 PM)Turner52 Wrote: One other thing I forgot to  mention. Before the last move I used the cheap plastic blast gates. BIG mistake. They built up a little bit of dust in corners and would not close all the way, leading to a lot of suction loss. I would recommend the more expensive metal gates or make your own. I made my own and they areself clearing. Many youtube videos on different ways. Metal boughten are an advantage if you might want to someday wire up an automatic opening system.

+1.

Had some older plastic gates when setting up the system, and they wouldn't close all the way.  I bought some self-cleaning metal gates, and that's what I have on the system now.  It's not an issue of metal versus plastic; it's the design.  Many cheapo gates have a closed end where the sliding mechanism packs in the saw dust.  It's very difficult/near impossible to clean out so that the gate will close fully.  If a metal gate doesn't have a way for that packed dust to be pushed out the other side, it, too, will start having issues closing fully.
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#18
  Re: Dust collection help by Michael Dow (I was able to do a m...)
Another DC thread?  Just flying through...
  1. I have an Oneida cyclone.
  2. I fabricated a custom stand so it can fit within the height of my basement shop and allows me to back it in/out of a purpose built alcove to facilitate maintenance/filter cleaning.
  3. I incorporated a short section of 7" duct pipe attached to the 7" inlet before reducing to lightweight S&D PVC  6" mains (read: readily available and less expensive). 
  4. I used 4" flex and metal gates for the machine connections (read: less expensive, readily available, and no machine butchering/augmentation).
  5. I have the typical set of stationary machines - cabinet tablesaw, 8" jointer, bandsaw, drum sander, and a 15" planer at the far end (over 32' run) and it gets every bit of it.
  6. I have a mini vacuum pump connected to the 220V remote switch that allows me to use bags in the collection drum.
  7. I can monitor the filter performance/clogging via a magnehlic.
  8. I deploy a Jet air scrubber as well.
  9. This setup allows for a nearly dust-free operating environment in my basement shop.
  10. The floor sweep pickup is AWESOME!
  11. I love this thing.  I plan to move in a couple years, but will rebuild it similarly at the next shop.


















YMMV. Results sre subjective. Woodworking, and essentially LIVING is believed by the State of California to be dangerous to your health (Propostion 65). Yada yada...

Cian - adding no value whatsoever
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#19
  Re: RE: Dust collection help by Cian (Another DC thread?  ...)
Cian,
  how wide is your stand and your alcove?

How much benefit do you get from the overhead air filtration?

As always, I'm in envy of the clean shop floors shown in your photos,
Matt
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#20
  Re: RE: Dust collection help by mdhills (Cian,   how wide is...)
(08-24-2019, 03:25 PM)mdhills Wrote: how wide is your stand and your alcove?

How much benefit do you get from the overhead air filtration?

Hey Matt -

Thanks!

The stand is ~28"" wide from the outer edges of the Unistrut legs and the alcove is ~36" wide.

My shop is only 12'x36' in a confined basement workspace so I run the air scrubber always when doing machining operations along with the cyclone.  I will run the air scrubber on its timer for 2 hours afterwards when I leave the shop at the end of a work session, and there is no settled dust on any of the surfaces when I return to the shop the next time.  Of course, you want to capture as much dust at the source as possible though.

FWIW, I have two windows (actually window wells) in my basement shop, and in the moderate Spring and Fall weather, I will at times open them and run a fan I had affixed to a form fit fixture in one window which blows air outwards.  In the other window, when opened I have a filter in another form fit fixture to "clean" the incoming air.  I typically use this setup when applying finishes by hand and want the area to continuously vent. but use this simply for fresh air as well.  Otherwise, one of the cooler things with having a basement shop is that it is roughly 64 degrees year round.  Cool
 

 








Cian - adding no value whatsoever
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