New Decking, at Least
#31
  Re: New Decking, at Least by hbmcc (About three/four yea...)
Just an update....

   
Have been chugging away with blocking--trying to avoid the extra 88 blocks. Stripped about 12 feet of old decking, the long boards are ten feet. Power washed  up to old deck, and copper naphthenate on all the framing surfaces. That stuff stinks, but is needed. Got tar tape on all the old joists and stringed the edges of the four-inch decking limits. The flashing is put in; just hokey where I pounded in drainage slopes and turned down drip edges.

It has been miserably hot and I need to stop work about 4p. The worst is both shoulders scream their hatred of me well into the night, and gripe it up in the morning. 

Tomorrow I start laying down deck! Unless I find something else I forgot to do.....
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#32
  Re: New Decking, at Least by hbmcc (About three/four yea...)
Need a real dummy to run a deck screw gizmo-thingy. It's not me.

   
Thought this, the first one would be the hardest to put down. No. It was hard only because I used an angle witch to set the 45-degree angle. One tic. At the house, lined to the post corner. The first deck board was flat and straight. It took a while, to trust my witch. Then I realized the deck joists were off angle about 2 inches.

The second was warped and twisted. That was the nasty bugger to get wrassled into position. Teetering on a couple joists and pulling the board into me at the hardest I can while pushing down and out onto the drill to drive a screw didn't work the three times I tried. Installing the third board, just as twisted, went a lot easier and not just because I could scamper down the three like a squirrel. It's all mechanics. 

Drive screws against the board's resistance. Help the arm trying to put the board into position. 

Had to stop at three boards. One day. About half as many screws in the wood fell through the joists to gravel seven feet below.

   
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#33
  Re: New Decking, at Least by hbmcc (About three/four yea...)
Looking good though I was laughing when I read that it was 95* and it was really hot... That's a cold front here. It's 8pm and it's still 95* and 52% humidity. It was 105 a little bit ago...


         I have bought that cedar once a few years ago. The only depot that carried it was out in the sticks. You would have thought the ones in the high end neighborhoods would carry it but no. It is extremely soft and I mean bordering on balsawood soft. If used for a deck I would space my framing at no less than 12" oc even then it will still be bouncy. It won't hold up to much traffic and definitely not to furniture.
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#34
  Re: RE: New Decking, at Least by Robert Adams (Looking good though ...)
(08-07-2019, 09:08 PM)Robert Adams Wrote: Looking good though I was laughing when I read that it was 95* and it was really hot... That's a cold front here. It's 8pm and it's still 95* and 52% humidity. It was 105 a little bit ago...


         I have bought that cedar once a few years ago. The only depot that carried it was out in the sticks. You would have thought the ones in the high end neighborhoods would carry it but no. It is extremely soft and I mean bordering on balsawood soft. If used for a deck I would space my framing at no less than 12" oc even then it will still be bouncy. It won't hold up to much traffic and definitely not to furniture.

You folks can have nasty weather all right, and I don't envy you any bit of it. I am not fond of heat and humidity is worse. I was living in Iowa going to school one summer and swore I'd never complain about cold winter... You can add clothes but only go so far when removing them. The thirty-degree daily fluctuations--thank God!--never permit body adjustment to temperature.

I think some balsa boards can exceed WRC for weight. Most not even juvenile status. The alternative is original growth Alaska Yellow Cedar which has only become generally available in the last few years as the habitat is destroyed by human induced climate change.
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#35
  Re: New Decking, at Least by hbmcc (About three/four yea...)
The rest of this build will likely crawl along. I am committed to finish, so will probably find this post toward the end of decking to post the grand finale. 

Have a good summer folks.

Pounding away!
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#36
  Re: RE: New Decking, at Least by hbmcc (Need a real dummy to...)
(08-07-2019, 06:13 PM)hbmcc Wrote: . Teetering on a couple joists 

Every deck I've built I lay some of the deck boards across the joists to walk on until I get enough boards screwed down to create a good working surface.  Im wondering why you didn't do that.
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#37
  Re: RE: New Decking, at Least by crokett™ ([quote='hbmcc' pid='...)
(08-08-2019, 03:01 PM)crokett™ Wrote: Every deck I've built I lay some of the deck boards across the joists to walk on until I get enough boards screwed down to create a good working surface.  Im wondering why you didn't do that.

Sorry for any confusion.... They are there. The ones *not* at a 45 are the mobile temporary pieces. My vertigo gets worse the older I get. I can get dizzy knowing I stand over any vertical open space. It takes about an hour to see joist surfaces and not me face-planting on rocks below the deck. It  matters not that spacing is less than 8-inches, which I could never slip through.
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#38
  Re: New Decking, at Least by hbmcc (About three/four yea...)
Use a 4'x4' sheet of plywood or osb
Mark

I'm no expert, unlike everybody else here - Busdrver


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#39
  Re: New Decking, at Least by hbmcc (About three/four yea...)
Did I ever mention I make a lot of work for myself? A lot of work. Crazy

No plywood. I'm too cheap. The loose decking works OK.
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#40
  Re: New Decking, at Least by hbmcc (About three/four yea...)
It rained last night and put a damper on deck work until this afternoon when the steamer came out. The first section is covered.
   

Each board is cut about three times. The first angle registers the piece at the house 'string'. The second cut sets the board proximate to the string at the railing; off over an 8th and it is cut the third time. Shorts are avoided but are wiggled to look decent. Once to about 6-feet, I use a tic-stick of approximate gap thickness to mark cuts.

The next  12 to 15 feet is all one dimension of cut. Then, the final ten, or so, feet will have the layout flip ninety with the boards locking in a weave, and mirror the first section's layout.

Except at the house flashing, all board ends terminate in a clear opening. It's a way to prevent accumulation of dirt and delay rot.

Scooting right along. A slug blazed by me earlier.
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