WTB hammer saw set
#6
  
Just spent an excellent weekend up at the Bad Axe factory learning how to properly sharpen a saw and keen to get my collection of rusty old plates back to their former glory. If anyone has a hammer saw set (Disston Star, Foley 251, Seymour Smith, Simonds etc. etc.) that they could be encouraged to part with, I could be very interested! They seem about as rare as hen's teeth in the usual spots.

Best,
Luke
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#7
  Re: WTB hammer saw set by LSanders (Just spent an excell...)
I've been looking for a Disston star for 25 years, unsuccessfully.

Rob Lee: are you listening?????/
Credo Elvem ipsum etiam vivere
Non impediti ratione cogitationis
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#8
  Re: WTB hammer saw set by LSanders (Just spent an excell...)
I've heard rumors that there are two or three groups evaluating the possibility of manufacturing a modern version of the hammer set. The biggest obstacle is in judging the potential size of the market since making castings ain't cheap. The hammer and anvil on the Disston Star have complex geometry and would also be expensive to machine. There was likely a reason that Disston gave up making them 80+ years ago. The Seymour Smith might be cheaper to produce.

   
Bob Page
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
In da U.P. of Michigan
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#9
  Re: WTB hammer saw set by LSanders (Just spent an excell...)
I've heard rumors that there are two or three groups evaluating the possibility of manufacturing a modern version of the hammer set. The biggest obstacle is in judging the potential size of the market since making castings ain't cheap. The hammer and anvil on the Disston Star have complex geometry and would also be expensive to machine. There was likely a reason that Disston gave up making them 80+ years ago. The Seymour Smith might be cheaper to produce.
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Good question. I went to a large tool store while in Chicago last week. They do not carry hand saws for wood.
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#10
  Re: RE: WTB hammer saw set by Bill Lyman (I've heard rumors th...)
(07-17-2019, 08:21 AM)Bill Lyman Wrote: I've heard rumors that there are two or three groups evaluating the possibility of manufacturing a modern version of the hammer set. The biggest obstacle is in judging the potential size of the market since making castings ain't cheap. The hammer and anvil on the Disston Star have complex geometry and would also be expensive to machine. There was likely a reason that Disston gave up making them 80+ years ago. The Seymour Smith might be cheaper to produce.
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Good question. I went to a large tool store while in Chicago last week. They do not carry hand saws for wood.

Just an FYI.
     Hammer setting is certainly easier on the hands, BUT
Bending steel at a sharper angle and doing it in a rapid process that generates heat at a micro level can leave the teeth a little more brittle and more prone to shearing if attempting to bend the teeth/ steel back the other way. "deformations of solids" This, of course, is mainly a concern if the tooth is accidentally set the wrong way and has to be bent back. Particularly on older more brittle hand saws. Also I have seen saws "hammer set" that were not as consistent as hand set teeth. ( Most likely due to the person striking the hammer/ rod. ) An adjustable spring activated setter would seem to be more consistent. I played with the Foley and it worked ok on larger hand saws, but not the 16 to 20 ppi range. No time to spend modifying it. Not enough volume to justify having something made. Too small of a market vs cost. Just my experience.
BontzSawWorks.net
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