drawer lock joints strength
#11
  
Making some drawers for the shop and I thought I'd try drawer lock joints since I picked up the bit in a garage sale not too long ago.  Anyone use them?  How reliable are they?
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#12
  Re: drawer lock joints strength by Juss1 (Making some drawers ...)
I did.  I found that setup was fussy and time consuming.  I would not use it for a single drawer.  I would rather use through dowels.  But if you have a lot of drawers to make this can be a fast way to make them.

For through dowels I first glue and screw using trim screws.  Once the glue has dried I back out the trim screws and drill for the dowels and glue them in to replace the screws.  No clamping required and it is fast and easy with no setup to speak of.  But slower than other methods that are nearly as good.

I have two matching dove tail fixtures setup for through dovetails.  An expense, but it allows me to build drawers on a moment's notice with no setups required.  If you find you find yourself making lots of drawers, a time saver. 

Or keep one setup and use half blind dovetails.
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#13
  Re: drawer lock joints strength by Juss1 (Making some drawers ...)
I use them all the time in things that aren't destined to have DT joints. They work fine. Your title asked about strength...I'd bet there's a test somewhere that shows they aren't as strong as some other joints, especially if the drawer sides are plywood. But they don't have to be the strongest...just sufficiently strong; and they are. I should mention I didn't use a drawer lock joint bit, though I have one. It's just as easy to cut them on the TS.
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#14
  Re: drawer lock joints strength by Juss1 (Making some drawers ...)
I don't have a router bit for lock joints but often use lock joints. I just use my table saw for them. Easy setup and less chance of tear-out.
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#15
  Re: drawer lock joints strength by Juss1 (Making some drawers ...)
I use then regularly. 
Used to make the box with an added on front, they are actually easy. One set up mills both sides of the joint.

Using 1/2” ply, I set the bit in the router table so that the height is 1/8” lower than the material (3/8” nominal) and set the fence so that the total depth of cut is the same as the stock (1/2” nominal)

The face part is run past the Bit flat on the table, the side run vertical. The settings will need to be tweaked, but with very few test cuts, I get perfect joints.

Here is a video I did years ago for Rockler’s Bit. It is old and vga, so bear with it:



Ralph Bagnall
http://www.woodcademy.com
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#16
  Re: RE: drawer lock joints strength by handi (I use then regularly...)
That video makes it look easy.  I'll have to try it.  I've got a shaper cutter I've had for years with that profile but I'll have to work on a properly fitting throat plate.
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#17
  Re: drawer lock joints strength by Juss1 (Making some drawers ...)
(08-08-2019, 11:40 AM)Juss1 Wrote: Making some drawers for the shop and I thought I'd try drawer lock joints since I picked up the bit in a garage sale not too long ago.  Anyone use them?  How reliable are they?

Just another option to consider.

Miller Dowels

Thinking about using these on a shop cabinet project that has a lot of drawers. Would appreciate comments on any here who have used them.

Thanks,

Doug
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#18
  Re: RE: drawer lock joints strength by Tapper ([quote='Juss1' pid='...)
(08-12-2019, 12:30 AM)Tapper Wrote: Just another option to consider.

Miller Dowels

Thinking about using these on a shop cabinet project that has a lot of drawers. Would appreciate comments on any here who have used them.

Thanks,

Doug

Doug, I have used them. I honestly do not see how they are superior to regular dowels. The stepped design does nothing to resist joint failure mechanically. It is still a dowel in a hole. 
And you are limited in the dowel sizes available and it only works with their expensive bit.
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#19
  Re: drawer lock joints strength by Juss1 (Making some drawers ...)
I'm with Cooler, for me the set up is too fussy.

Again, as Cooler mentioned the trim head screw/dowel method he described is a very nifty way to do drawers.  I like it mainly because there is no clamping and it is very fast.  And I think the result looks good, too.

A locking rabbet & joint is also good joint to learn.  The set up is pretty simple on the table saw. I use dowels to strenghten the joint because it is essentially an end grain glue up.
Everything is a prototype so its a one of a kind.
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#20
  Re: RE: drawer lock joints strength by rwe2156 (I'm with Cooler, for...)
(08-15-2019, 11:00 AM)rwe2156 Wrote: I'm with Cooler, for me the set up is too fussy.

Again, as Cooler mentioned the trim head screw/dowel method he described is a very nifty way to do drawers.  I like it mainly because there is no clamping and it is very fast.  And I think the result looks good, too.

A locking rabbet & joint is also good joint to learn.  The set up is pretty simple on the table saw.  I use dowels to strenghten the joint because it is essentially an end grain glue up.
The Drawer Lock Bit is a Router Bit Version of the locking rabbet cut you mentioned. 
It is a different bit that the Lock Miter Bit, Which is indeed fussy to set up.
Ralph Bagnall
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