Pew restoration
#6
  
I have restored a couple of Pews in my church that was built around 1835. I just picked up another one. The veneer seat (like the previous ones) has started to splinter and peel do to water problems. The removal isn't to bad using a putty knife and a heat gun. But putting on the PSA veneer can be challenging (31" X 123"), I have to use 2 sheets. The seat is curved and using an edge trimmer isn't an option due to the wood edging on both sides. So the pieces have to be cut to exact size.

Any suggestion to help make this go a little bit easier would be appreciated.
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#7
  Re: Pew restoration by Halfathumb (I have restored a co...)
(08-15-2019, 12:04 PM)as Halfathumb Wrote: I have restored a couple of Pews in my church that was built around 1835. I just picked up another one. The veneer seat (like the previous ones) has started to splinter and peel do to water problems. The removal isn't to bad using a putty knife and a heat gun. But putting on the PSA veneer can be challenging (31" X 123"), I have to use 2 sheets. The seat is curved and using an edge trimmer isn't an option due to the wood edging on both sides. So the pieces have to be cut to exact size.

Any suggestion to help make this go a little bit easier would be appreciated.
I don't do much with veneer, but here is a source with oversized sheets so you don't have to piece the sheets together:  They offer 4' x 12', so only one sheet per pew.

As far as alignment goes, I used this method in my picture framing business.

First cut the veneer to size.  Then peel back about  3/4" of the release paper at one of the wide ends of the veneer.  Fold it back on itself.

Lay the veneer in place using masking tape to hold the veneer in position. 

The folded release paper will hold the veneer above the substrate so it is easy to adjust the position.  Once you are satisfied that the veneer is in the right position, press down on the veneer where you folded back the release paper.  Once that edge is adhered, alignment should be perfect. 

At that point remove all the masking tape that you used to hold the veneer in position.

Lift the veneer so that you can grasp the 3/4" fold of release paper and pull it back about 1 - 2 inches.  Press the newly exposed adhesive to the substrate.  Repeat in 1-2 in increments, making sure you push out all the air bubbles as you proceed.  Repeat until all the adhesive is exposed.

You can cut the veneer slightly oversize.  But first apply masking tape where you don't want the veneer to stick.  Then use a veneer saw to trim to size.  The excess should remove easily along with the masking tape.

https://www.oakwoodveneer.com/oak-veneer...t-cut.html

The peel & stick is only available to 10 feet; the larger sheets require adhesive.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#8
  Re: Pew restoration by Halfathumb (I have restored a co...)
If you have trouble cutting to exact size then use poster board to make an exact fit template.  Kraft paper may work also.  Done both.   PSA is tricking for sure in  tight spaces like that.
John

Always use the right tool for the job.

We need to clean house.
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#9
  Re: RE: Pew restoration by John Mihich (If you have trouble ...)
(08-15-2019, 02:06 PM)John Mihich Wrote: If you have trouble cutting to exact size then use poster board to make an exact fit template.  Kraft paper may work also.  Done both.   PSA is tricking for sure in  tight spaces like that.

Thanks Cooler & john.
I have another few questions.
Do I have to remove the entire veneer before I lay the new? I am having a fair amount of success removing the top surface, but not easy to remove all of it, especially on the curves. If I smooth out the rough edges, will the new adhere to the lower surfaces? It looks like I'll be using adhesive anyway. How difficult is that a curved surface?
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#10
  Re: RE: Pew restoration by Halfathumb ([quote='John Mihich'...)
(08-19-2019, 02:36 PM)Halfathumb Wrote: Thanks Cooler & john.
I have another few questions.
Do I have to remove the entire veneer before I lay the new? I am having a fair amount of success removing the top surface, but not easy to remove all of it, especially on the curves. If I smooth out the rough edges, will the new adhere to the lower surfaces? It looks like I'll be using adhesive anyway. How difficult is that a curved surface?

As long as the finish is off.  I would also clean the area with DN alcohol.
John

Always use the right tool for the job.

We need to clean house.
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