How to Make a Sixteen Foot Trestle Table
#11
  
Our client had a very large family, entertained guests often and had just built a substantial sized home for himself… so he wanted a custom made dining table that was 16 feet long by 48” wide. He wanted it made from oak and be well aged in appearance.
I had built a number of large trestle tables before but nothing of this size. I had to calculate the table top’s weight to see how difficult it would be to manipulate in our shop. At 2” thick it was already approaching 900 lbs which would stop my son & I from even turning the table top over (safely). So… I designed it such that the outside edge boards and the bread board ends would be over 2” thick and the great majority of it’s center area would be only 1.25” thick. This would make the top alone weigh aprox. 600 lbs, which made it do-able, if not easy to handle.




I found a company in Maine that specialized in creating very large table pedestals. I only wanted to use two (not three) pedestals in case his floor was not perfectly flat (and it looked better that way).




Once I had the outside edge machined to 2.25” thick and the inside to 1.25”, we aligned them all and dry clamped to see what we had.




The bread board ends are boards that cap each end of the long table top. They run 90 degrees to all the other boards, hide the end grain there and help keep the surface flat. They are attached by means of a tongue (left protruding from the long boards) and a groove cut into the bread board in which the tongue will insert….. and they are kept in place by dowel pins. The two holes at the end of each tongue are elongated so that all the long, center boards can expand and contract along their width (from changes in humidity) without being held ridged by the dowel pins. You’ll notice that I made the ‘tongue and groove’ hidden by stopping it short of both ends by an inch or so.







We fastened the pedestals to the table’s bottom with a bolt that is half wood thread (place in the table top’s bottom) and half machine thread (for wings nuts and washers) to go through an enlarged hole in the pedestals support spreader. We found the best positions for the legs by placing the top on the pedestals (somewhere between a quarter and a third of the way in from each end) until the top was dead straight (no sag).


 

Now we were ready for the finishing process. They had selected an aged look from samples that we made. The table top and legs were gouged, filed and torched …before they were stained and top coated.
It was very hard to get a picture of the finished table in their home that showed the entire table AND what the final color looked like… so I have two shots here.







Russell Hudson / Hudson Cabinetmaking, Inc.[/align]
"Courage is knowing what not to fear."
http://www.hudsoncabinetmaking.com
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#12
  Re: How to Make a Sixteen Foot Trestle Table by Russell Hudson (Our client had a ver...)
Oh, WOW.....really nice (and glad I wasn't helping move it!). What the plan for chairs (or benches, or whatever).
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#13
  Re: How to Make a Sixteen Foot Trestle Table by Russell Hudson (Our client had a ver...)
That is an impressive span.
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#14
  Re: How to Make a Sixteen Foot Trestle Table by Russell Hudson (Our client had a ver...)
The proportions look great!  I agree with you, two pedestals are better than three.
"I tried being reasonable..........I didn't like it." Clint Eastwood
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#15
  Re: How to Make a Sixteen Foot Trestle Table by Russell Hudson (Our client had a ver...)
That's a lovely pedestal design.   Yes
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#16
  Re: How to Make a Sixteen Foot Trestle Table by Russell Hudson (Our client had a ver...)
Very Nice! Cool Cool Cool Cool
Thanks,  Curt
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#17
  Re: How to Make a Sixteen Foot Trestle Table by Russell Hudson (Our client had a ver...)
(08-29-2019, 11:06 AM)Russell Hudson Wrote: Our client had a very large family, entertained guests often and had just built a substantial sized home for himself… so he wanted a custom made dining table that was 16 feet long by 48” wide. He wanted it made from oak and be well aged in appearance.
I had built a number of large trestle tables before but nothing of this size. I had to calculate the table top’s weight to see how difficult it would be to manipulate in our shop. At 2” thick it was already approaching 900 lbs which would stop my son & I from even turning the table top over (safely). So… I designed it such that the outside edge boards and the bread board ends would be over 2” thick and the great majority of it’s center area would be only 1.25” thick. This would make the top alone weigh aprox. 600 lbs, which made it do-able, if not easy to handle.




I found a company in Maine that specialized in creating very large table pedestals. I only wanted to use two (not three) pedestals in case his floor was not perfectly flat (and it looked better that way).




Once I had the outside edge machined to 2.25” thick and the inside to 1.25”, we aligned them all and dry clamped to see what we had.




The bread board ends are boards that cap each end of the long table top. They run 90 degrees to all the other boards, hide the end grain there and help keep the surface flat. They are attached by means of a tongue (left protruding from the long boards) and a groove cut into the bread board in which the tongue will insert….. and they are kept in place by dowel pins. The two holes at the end of each tongue are elongated so that all the long, center boards can expand and contract along their width (from changes in humidity) without being held ridged by the dowel pins. You’ll notice that I made the ‘tongue and groove’ hidden by stopping it short of both ends by an inch or so.







We fastened the pedestals to the table’s bottom with a bolt that is half wood thread (place in the table top’s bottom) and half machine thread (for wings nuts and washers) to go through an enlarged hole in the pedestals support spreader. We found the best positions for the legs by placing the top on the pedestals (somewhere between a quarter and a third of the way in from each end) until the top was dead straight (no sag).


 

Now we were ready for the finishing process. They had selected an aged look from samples that we made. The table top and legs were gouged, filed and torched …before they were stained and top coated.
It was very hard to get a picture of the finished table in their home that showed the entire table AND what the final color looked like… so I have two shots here.







Russell Hudson / Hudson Cabinetmaking, Inc.[/align]

Nice, going to need a few guys just to move it if you ever have to. I myself am partial to QSWO.
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#18
  Re: How to Make a Sixteen Foot Trestle Table by Russell Hudson (Our client had a ver...)
(08-29-2019, 11:06 AM)Russell Hudson Wrote: Our client had a very large family, entertained guests often and had just built a substantial sized home for himself… so he wanted a custom made dining table that was 16 feet long by 48” wide. He wanted it made from oak and be well aged in appearance.
I had built a number of large trestle tables before but nothing of this size. I had to calculate the table top’s weight to see how difficult it would be to manipulate in our shop. At 2” thick it was already approaching 900 lbs which would stop my son & I from even turning the table top over (safely). So… I designed it such that the outside edge boards and the bread board ends would be over 2” thick and the great majority of it’s center area would be only 1.25” thick. This would make the top alone weigh aprox. 600 lbs, which made it do-able, if not easy to handle.




I found a company in Maine that specialized in creating very large table pedestals. I only wanted to use two (not three) pedestals in case his floor was not perfectly flat (and it looked better that way).




Once I had the outside edge machined to 2.25” thick and the inside to 1.25”, we aligned them all and dry clamped to see what we had.




The bread board ends are boards that cap each end of the long table top. They run 90 degrees to all the other boards, hide the end grain there and help keep the surface flat. They are attached by means of a tongue (left protruding from the long boards) and a groove cut into the bread board in which the tongue will insert….. and they are kept in place by dowel pins. The two holes at the end of each tongue are elongated so that all the long, center boards can expand and contract along their width (from changes in humidity) without being held ridged by the dowel pins. You’ll notice that I made the ‘tongue and groove’ hidden by stopping it short of both ends by an inch or so.







We fastened the pedestals to the table’s bottom with a bolt that is half wood thread (place in the table top’s bottom) and half machine thread (for wings nuts and washers) to go through an enlarged hole in the pedestals support spreader. We found the best positions for the legs by placing the top on the pedestals (somewhere between a quarter and a third of the way in from each end) until the top was dead straight (no sag).


 

Now we were ready for the finishing process. They had selected an aged look from samples that we made. The table top and legs were gouged, filed and torched …before they were stained and top coated.
It was very hard to get a picture of the finished table in their home that showed the entire table AND what the final color looked like… so I have two shots here.







Russell Hudson / Hudson Cabinetmaking, Inc.[/align]

Really nice.  There is a company not that far from me that specializes in that type table.  The get reclaimed lumber from building demolitions and mill them down.  I bought some machinery from them, they were milling up what used to be a part of UC Berkeley's Stadium at the time
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#19
  Re: RE: How to Make a Sixteen Foot Trestle Table by Bob10 ([quote='Russell Huds...)
(08-30-2019, 10:31 AM)Bob10 Wrote: Really nice.  There is a company not that far from me that specializes in that type table.  The get reclaimed lumber from building demolitions and mill them down.  I bought some machinery from them, they were milling up what used to be a part of UC Berkeley's Stadium at the time

Nice table.
     I was wondering how high from the floor the stretcher was/is. How was it attached to the pedestals exactly. Seems like it would sag over time. It was suggested I build about a 10-12 ft. x 42"-48" table for my fire house, but they didn't want the stretcher across. So I have  been thinking about that off and on since. Not sure how or if I will build it. Fire personnel have an amazing way of destroying things.  If there is a way, they will find it. Some days it is like an adult kindergarten class. Smile
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#20
  Re: RE: How to Make a Sixteen Foot Trestle Table by RonB1957 ([quote='Bob10' pid='...)
(08-30-2019, 12:11 PM)RonB1957 Wrote: Nice table.
     I was wondering how high from the floor the stretcher was/is. How was it attached to the pedestals exactly. Seems like it would sag over time. It was suggested I build about a 10-12 ft. x 42"-48" table for my fire house, but they didn't want the stretcher across. So I have  been thinking about that off and on since. Not sure how or if I will build it. Fire personnel have an amazing way of destroying things.  If there is a way, they will find it. Some days it is like an adult kindergarten class. Smile

the stretcher was actually 2.25" X 4" X 7' long and solid red oak. mortises were cut slightly larger and 3.5" deep in the sides of the pedestals you could put your car on this stretcher & it wouldn't sag (or almost, anyway) / If you have pedestals that are wider than the ones I had (12"), then you could still make this size table without any sag whatsoever by placing them at the right distances in from each ends / hardwood of this thickness was substantially stiffer than I worried about / it's like a rock / this ain't 3/4" material
"Courage is knowing what not to fear."
http://www.hudsoncabinetmaking.com
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