Hardness
#8
  
I want to turn a vase using purple heart- walnut- maple and mahogany. When doing the final sanding will I have problems keeping everything smooth due to the huge difference in hardness. I really want to use the mahogany due to the beautiful color contrast it will give me but don't want to spend hours gluing up almost a thousand pieces and not be able to get a nice finished surface.
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#9
  Re: Hardness by Turner52 (I want to turn a vas...)
If you are very careful with fine slicing cuts on the last pass, you won't need much sanding. If you use sandpaper to refine the shape or to fix tearout and big toolmarks, I think you're likely to have a problem.
We do segmented turning, not because it is easy, but because it is hard.
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#10
  Re: Hardness by Turner52 (I want to turn a vas...)
Since it's a segmented turning you won't have to deal with end grain so you should be able to keep the tearout to a minimum. Use a gouge, keep it sharp and learn how to do shear scraping (with the gouge) then you shouldn't have to do much sanding.
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#11
  Re: Hardness by Turner52 (I want to turn a vas...)
(10-15-2019, 03:00 PM)Turner52 Wrote: I want to turn a vase using purple heart- walnut- maple and mahogany. When doing the final sanding will I have problems keeping everything smooth due to the huge difference in hardness. I really want to use the mahogany due to the beautiful color contrast it will give me but don't want to spend hours gluing up almost a thousand pieces and not be able to get a nice finished surface.
Sanding with the work rotating, and the sanding device on the toolrest just as if it were a cutting tool, will be fine, however, you might run into some color bleed problems.  What they make sanding sealers for.
Better to follow the leader than the pack. Less to step in.
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#12
  Re: RE: Hardness by SceneryMaker (If you are very care...)
(10-15-2019, 06:14 PM)SceneryMaker Wrote: If you are very careful with fine slicing cuts on the last pass, you won't need much sanding.  If you use sandpaper to refine the shape or to fix tearout and big toolmarks, I think you're likely to have a problem.

I agree with this statement, looking forward to seeing your finished piece.
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#13
  Re: Hardness by Turner52 (I want to turn a vas...)
Do to no endgrain as Frank stated, I should be able to start sanding at a minimum of 150 and hopefully 220. I will give it a try and post a picture when done. I usually sand something like his to 400 and sometimes to 600. It's going to take a long time for the glueup so the pictures will be quite a bit in the future The feature ring will be 12 pieced with 12 pointed stars in each. With how I am going to do that there will be 36 pieces in each star segment. Wish me luck I might need it.
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#14
  Re: Hardness by Turner52 (I want to turn a vas...)
(10-16-2019, 04:48 PM)Turner52 Wrote: Do to no endgrain as Frank stated, I should be able to start sanding at a minimum of 150 and hopefully 220. I will give it a try and post a picture when done. I usually sand something like his to 400 and sometimes to 600. It's going to take a long time for the glueup so the pictures will be quite a bit in the future The feature ring will be 12 pieced with 12 pointed stars in each. With how I am going to do that there will be 36 pieces in each star segment. Wish me luck I might need it.

Oh yeah, I want to see that!
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