Garage entry door threshold options
#20
  Re: RE: Garage entry door threshold options by Robert Adams ([quote='meackerman' ...)
(10-21-2019, 05:51 PM)Robert Adams Wrote:                Those are really nice but they require some work to install in a commercial style metal door.

yeah, mine were installed in wooden doors.

Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away. - Philip K. Dick

Mark

Reply
#21
  Re: Garage entry door threshold options by Bryan11 (Below is my garage e...)
I am really cheap when it comes to things like this.  I used pressure treated wood to replace the threshold.  I did cut the frame high enough to slide the 2x6 under it.  I did chamber the 2x so I could roll my tools out if needed.
John

Always use the right tool for the job.

We need to clean house.
Reply
#22
  Re: Garage entry door threshold options by Bryan11 (Below is my garage e...)
All good suggestions above. I also second the suggestion to put a cover over the door depending on the door's orientation and prevailing wind/rain direction. If the door regularly gets wet with rain, then a cover might help a lot. It will also give you a place to stand while you get your umbrella up.
Reply
#23
  Re: Garage entry door threshold options by Bryan11 (Below is my garage e...)
An outward swing door is the easiest to break into.....pop the hinge pins and open the door backwards. Even the pressed pins can be popped loose with a good chisel.


Ed
Reply
#24
  Re: RE: Garage entry door threshold options by EdL (An outward swing doo...)
(10-21-2019, 09:02 PM)EdL Wrote: An outward swing door is the easiest to break into.....pop the hinge pins and open the door backwards. Even the pressed pins can be popped loose with a good chisel.


Ed


            Actually its harder to. Years ago that was not the case. Now even insurance companies prefer(ours strongly recommended an outward opening door on my shop) an outward opening door which is why that's what you see on commercial buildings. The pins are not removable anymore and the hinges have catches built into them and on better ones there are pins that screw into the jamb and stick into the door side of the hinge when closed so even if you cut the hinge pin off the door still isn't going to open.
Reply
#25
  Re: RE: Garage entry door threshold options by EdL (An outward swing doo...)
(10-21-2019, 09:02 PM)EdL Wrote: An outward swing door is the easiest to break into.....pop the hinge pins and open the door backwards. Even the pressed pins can be popped loose with a good chisel.


Ed

True, but there are these:  (A determined thief, with enough time, can get into any building). Most deterrants are designed for prolonging the entry enough to cause the thief to give up or be interrupted.

   




Reply
#26
  Re: RE: Garage entry door threshold options by K. L McReynolds (Detached building en...)
(10-21-2019, 04:42 PM)K. L McReynolds Wrote: Detached building entry doors should open out. Several reasons. One, easier to keep water out. Two, makes breaking in more difficult. Three, getting out in an emergency is faster. Four, no space needed inside for door swing. 

Major reason house/attached space doors swing in is so storm doors can be installed.

Install a swing out door with water proofing between the sill and concrete, making sure the concrete slopes away from the inside floor.

If you install the door so it swings outward then make sure the hinges have locking pins. This hinge has a set screw that can only be reached when the door is open. There are other non- removable type hinge pins without setscrews. 
mike
Reply
#27
  Re: Garage entry door threshold options by Bryan11 (Below is my garage e...)
The threshold should have bent metal flashing installed underneath in a bed of caulk (sill flashing pan) to keep water from penetrating under it.
Build the jambs out of pvc and they will never rot. Fiberglass doors hold up well and never rot either.

I replaced the jambs on my exterior doors about two years ago and they were only 7 years old but starting to rot. 
PVC boards are easy to work with and hold up.
Reply
#28
  Re: Garage entry door threshold options by Bryan11 (Below is my garage e...)
I've had basically the same issues on my door. Steps I took:
The threshold piece looks like yours has a wood insert, mine did too and it was rotted and bug eaten. I ordered a new one from a local lumberyard (not HD or Lowes). The new one had a synthetic insert. I had to do a lot of trimming to get it to fit right, mostly the thickness. Whatever moron thought wood was a good idea for that piece should be fired.

The frame stiles I had already replaced the lower 18" before. Last summer I ended up ripping out the lock side jamb and trim and basically recreated it with 5/4" lumber. Painted and caulked everywhere. Even caulked end grain before installing it.

The exterior I've caulked a lot.

Next time if I'm still here I'll use Azak instead. Check inside the framing for rot. On my door water ingress has been an issue since the house was first built.

Mike
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)