Shooting Boards
#11
  
I'm fixing to embark on my version of Matt Kenney's 52 boxes.

I've always been a power tool guy, so I'd like to try to do as much of this by hand as possible as a learning experience.  At least the joinery portion.

That being said I need to set myself up with some shooting boards for this, square, miter and probably long 45's as well.

I've tried searching but I'm not seeing a whole lot.

Anyone have any particularly favorite versions and or plans?

Thanks in advance

Cory
"Oh. Um, l-- look, i-- i-- if we built this large wooden badger" ~ Sir Bedevere
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#12
  Re: Shooting Boards by Large Wooden Badger (I'm fixing to embark...)
Shooting boards. Seems Rob Hanson was selling his to Lee Valley if I remember.
Rob is shut down. LV may still have one/some
Steve





Working on 20,000 Winkgrin





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#13
  Re: Shooting Boards by Large Wooden Badger (I'm fixing to embark...)
The Lee Valley one comes up in the search.  Looks great but I thought I'd try to roll my own.
"Oh. Um, l-- look, i-- i-- if we built this large wooden badger" ~ Sir Bedevere
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#14
  Re: Shooting Boards by Large Wooden Badger (I'm fixing to embark...)
(10-30-2019, 03:17 PM)Large Wooden Badger Wrote: I'm fixing to embark on my version of Matt Kenney's 52 boxes.

I've always been a power tool guy, so I'd like to try to do as much of this by hand as possible as a learning experience.  At least the joinery portion.

That being said I need to set myself up with some shooting boards for this, square, miter and probably long 45's as well.

I've tried searching but I'm not seeing a whole lot.

Anyone have any particularly favorite versions and or plans?

Thanks in advance

Cory

Cory,

Here is a photo of my shooting board with the parts labeled. The photo doesn't give dimensions, but I don't think they are important. You can make it any size you want. This board has served me well for many years. It can be used from either side. This helps with irregular profiles such as moldings, but the left side seldom gets used in my shop. Many people are completely satisfied with a board that offers only right side use (or left side if you are a lefty).

I also built a second board for shooting 45 degree miters on wider boards. Attached is actually a photo I found on the internet that I used it to make my board. Mine is almost identical to the one in the photo. It is very handy for making small boxes.

The key to making these boards is to be very careful to nail your angles, especially the second board. I can shim the first board to compensate for minor errors by placing shims between the stationary fence and the sacrificial fence. The second board for shooting wider stock is more difficult to adjust.

Hope this helps.

P.S. - I've attached additional photos of the first board in its normal configurations without the labels with and without the 45 degree miter attachment.


Attached Files Image(s)
   
   
   
   
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#15
  Re: Shooting Boards by Large Wooden Badger (I'm fixing to embark...)
Thank you.  Those are great and in line with where I was wanting to go.

On the 45's fence - I see a knob that I assume holds it to the base but I'm not seeing a corresponding hole in the base?

edit that - I see it now, you have to remove the 90 degree fence first.  Any reason you can't leave the 90 in place all the time and just add the 45 when needed?
"Oh. Um, l-- look, i-- i-- if we built this large wooden badger" ~ Sir Bedevere
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#16
  Re: Shooting Boards by Large Wooden Badger (I'm fixing to embark...)
You could probably get away without removing the sacrificial fence before attaching the miter fence. My reason for doing it the way I did was the thought that, if I had to replace the sacrificial fence, the replacement might not be exactly the same dimension as the original. This would throw off the placement of the miter fence attachment. I decided it would be better to reference everything against the stationary fence so that wouldn't be an issue in the future.

The miter fence attachment is held by the shoulder bolt shown in the photo. It screws into a threaded T nut in the bottom of the shooting board. The hole for the T nut is countersunk so the head of the T nut is flush with the bottom of the board and the board will sit flat on the bench top. I made sure that the miter fence was snugged up tight to the stationary fence when I marked the holes for the T nut and the shoulder bolt.

Also, the stationary fence is hard maple which holds threads very well. I just drilled and tapped the holes for the brass machine screws that fasten the sacrificial fence to the stationary fence into the maple. It has worked well for a number of years. I don't see any reason too use threaded inserts or T nuts for this application.

Hope this helps. I will be happy to answer any other questions you might have.

P.S. here's a photo of the back to the miter fence attachment that might be helpful:


Attached Files Image(s)
   
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#17
  Re: Shooting Boards by Large Wooden Badger (I'm fixing to embark...)
perfect.

Thank you.

Cory
"Oh. Um, l-- look, i-- i-- if we built this large wooden badger" ~ Sir Bedevere
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#18
  Re: RE: Shooting Boards by Large Wooden Badger (perfect. Thank yo...)
(10-30-2019, 05:33 PM)Large Wooden Badger Wrote: perfect.

Thank you.

Cory

Cory, I added a photo to my reply you may have missed. Check it out.

Hank
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#19
  Re: RE: Shooting Boards by Hank Knight (You could probably g...)
(10-30-2019, 05:26 PM)Hank Knight Wrote: You could probably get away without removing the sacrificial fence before attaching the miter fence. My reason for doing it the way I did was the thought that, if I had to replace the sacrificial fence, the replacement might not be exactly the same dimension as the original. This would throw off the placement of the miter fence attachment. I decided it would be better to reference everything against the stationary fence so that wouldn't be an issue in the future.

The miter fence attachment is held by the shoulder bolt shown in the photo. It screws into a threaded T nut in the bottom of the shooting board. The hole for the T nut is countersunk so the head of the T nut is flush with the bottom of the board and the board will sit flat on the bench top. I made sure that the miter fence was snugged up tight to the stationary fence when I marked the holes for the T nut and the shoulder bolt.

Also, the stationary fence is hard maple which holds threads very well. I just drilled and tapped the holes for the brass machine screws that fasten the sacrificial fence to the stationary fence into the maple. It has worked well for a number of years. I don't see any reason too use threaded inserts or T nuts for this application.

Hope this helps. I will be happy to answer any other questions you might have.

P.S. here's a photo of the back to the miter fence attachment that might be helpful:

That's really nice work Hank!
Lonnie
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#20
  Re: Shooting Boards by Large Wooden Badger (I'm fixing to embark...)
The style of shooting board depends on the plane you are using. Choose a flat shooting board - like Hank’s (beautifil!) if you have a skew-bladed plane, such as a #51 type. If you have a straight-bladed plane, such as a LA Jack, then a ramped board is preferred.

As a counter to Hank’s flat board, there is a 5 degree ramped board (in Jarrah and quartersawn Tasmanian Oak) ..




The fence is adjustable both across the board and between 45- and 90 degrees ...







A critical component is a side fence, especially if using a #51 type plane ..




Here it is in use with a donkey’s ear (which is attached to the fence with a bolt ...




With a wooden strike block plane (37 degree bed, bevel down) ...




Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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