Tearout question
#11
  
I used a gouge to add texture to a piece I'm working on. I tried to go light, but this is bubinga and the grain is all over the place. So I'm getting tearout. 



The grooves are around 1/2" to less than 1" long. 

What's my best bet to eliminate the tearout without rounding over the edges? Option one, put a more keen edge on my gouge and go again, very lightly. It seems pretty sharp now though. Two, cut a thin strip from a card scraper, round the end with a file, draw a burr and gently scrape. I've done that before, and it works but man will that take forever! Option 3, something I haven't thought of.

Note: there are two areas like this. Both are about 6" long, roughly 1" wide. So there are quite a few of these little grooves to deal with.

Thanks,
Best,
Aram, defying laws of geometry

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: http://awacs.smugmug.com/Woodworking
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#12
  Re: Tearout question by Aram (I used a gouge to ad...)
I was beaten to a pulp on this forum when I said Follansbee's work was primitive. It still is and he admits the style and its provenance. Your carving cavities on the wood surface impart a rough handmade scheme. The tearout will be part of that image. Try to work flaws out and your "error" will only go bad. 

If it bothers you, then the choice to do that texture was not the best. You might need to rebuild the whole thing to correct the piece. All I can see is maybe, 3-inches.

Ps. Remember, the best judge of something is yourself. Just make sure to get an honest critique before jumping to a rash, super critical decision.
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#13
  Re: RE: Tearout question by hbmcc (I was beaten to a pu...)
(11-28-2019, 03:53 PM)hbmcc Wrote: Your carving cavities on the wood surface impart a rough handmade scheme. The tearout will be part of that image. Try to work flaws out and your "error" will only go bad. 
Thanks but I am not looking for a rough-hewn look. 
If it bothers you, then the choice to do that texture was not the best. You might need to rebuild the whole thing to correct the piece. All I can see is maybe, 3-inches.
I might, sure. It's two frame and panel pieces that make a sliding top, already glued up, already fitted to the box. So this would be a lot of work. In any case, I'm sure it's possible to smooth it out, at least to a degree. That said, yes, I might have to remake these pieces. Not looking forward to that.


Ps. Remember, the best judge of something is yourself. Just make sure to get an honest critique before jumping to a rash, super critical decision.
That's easy. I can't live with it the way it is. It looks awful.
Best,
Aram, defying laws of geometry

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: http://awacs.smugmug.com/Woodworking
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#14
  Re: Tearout question by Aram (I used a gouge to ad...)
I would use scrapers. Make or find teardrop shaped ends. Read the grain and scrape with it.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#15
  Re: RE: Tearout question by Derek Cohen (I would use scrapers...)
(11-28-2019, 07:42 PM)Derek Cohen Wrote: I would use scrapers. Make or find teardrop shaped ends. Read the grain and scrape with it.

Regards from Perth

Derek

Thanks, that does seem to be the most realistic approach. 

I also remembered that I used liquid hide glue to attach these things, so if it comes down to it, I can hit them with a heat gun, and (hopefully) get them off. Then I'd just have to remake these lid ends/handles (that's what they are) and not rebuild the entire lid.
Best,
Aram, defying laws of geometry

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: http://awacs.smugmug.com/Woodworking
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#16
  Re: Tearout question by Aram (I used a gouge to ad...)
I'd go with Derek's advice. I posted once about what was crushed fibers in the tails of some dry African Mahogany. I was promptly told to learn to sharpen and try again even though my attempts were with Veritas PM V-11 chisels fresh off a 13k stone. So yeah, go with the scrapers.
Thanks,  Curt
-----------------
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards."
      -- Soren Kierkegaard
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#17
  Re: Tearout question by Aram (I used a gouge to ad...)
Have you considered those detail scrapers with small carbide blade (wheel or drop-shaped) and a handle?
I have 'regular' version of it (2in flat blade), from Bahco, and it is so much efficient than usual metal plate hold by hands.

You may also get blade only, mount it [with a screw] to a rod and have scraper that you can use with a mallet (like a gouge).
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#18
  Re: Tearout question by Aram (I used a gouge to ad...)
Could a Dremel with a sanding cone work here?
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#19
  Re: RE: Tearout question by Strokes77 (Could a Dremel with ...)
(11-29-2019, 10:31 AM)Strokes77 Wrote: Could a Dremel with a sanding cone work here?

It is difficult to control a rotary cutter, and then can both gouge the surface unevenly, and it can overrun the top edge and round them over.

A curved scraper is much easier to control, and it will preserve edges at the surface.

There are round carbide cutters available. I know Lee Valley sell a tool holder.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#20
  Re: Tearout question by Aram (I used a gouge to ad...)
I started in with some small, rounded scrapers I made. They work well enough (not surprising, I've used them before -- on Bubinga, in fact). It's still ugly. I like the texture idea, but it came out terrible. it's not worth smoothing. I got the offending pieces off with a heat gun. I'll make new ones.
Best,
Aram, defying laws of geometry

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: http://awacs.smugmug.com/Woodworking
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